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    I'm in year 12 at the moment and doing further maths and physics. I really enjoy the mechanics part of the maths and physics, like SUVAT and working out forces with trig etc. so I'm wondering what would be the best type of engineering for me to do at uni. Thanks.
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    Sounds like Mechanical for you, boy.
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    Mechanic, civil or aero.
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    aeronautical engineering sounds the most interesting to me

    I'm doing the same subjects as you except im taking chemistry on top

    my maths teacher told me that you have to use imaginary numbers to calculate the fluid flow in a plane. Sounds awesome and heavily related to f.maths
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    (Original post by beelz)
    I'm in year 12 at the moment and doing further maths and physics. I really enjoy the mechanics part of the maths and physics, like SUVAT and working out forces with trig etc. so I'm wondering what would be the best type of engineering for me to do at uni. Thanks.
    I say either civil engineering or Quantity Surveying.
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    (Original post by beelz)
    I'm in year 12 at the moment and doing further maths and physics. I really enjoy the mechanics part of the maths and physics, like SUVAT and working out forces with trig etc. so I'm wondering what would be the best type of engineering for me to do at uni. Thanks.
    Considering what you have said Mechanical seems to be the way to go for you.

    P.S : I would like to add that Electrical Engineering is not that bad too (Not that I am biased)
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    (Original post by ilyking)
    aeronautical engineering sounds the most interesting to me

    I'm doing the same subjects as you except im taking chemistry on top

    my maths teacher told me that you have to use imaginary numbers to calculate the fluid flow in a plane. Sounds awesome and heavily related to f.maths
    yeah im doing biology and chemistry aswell as i originally wanted to do medicine but now i prefer the thought of something more mathematical
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    if you're not certain, do a general course or one that lets you switch later. Then you can specialise once you've tried them all.

    Seriously, it'll suck if you decide a year or 2 in you'd have rather done a different type.

    Personally I'd say the closest thing to year 12 mechanics is civil engineering, not aerospace. But read a bit about them all, or try and get on a summer school or something to see for yourself.
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    mech eng
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    (Original post by ilyking)
    aeronautical engineering sounds the most interesting to me

    I'm doing the same subjects as you except im taking chemistry on top

    my maths teacher told me that you have to use imaginary numbers to calculate the fluid flow in a plane. Sounds awesome and heavily related to f.maths
    did your maths teacher do engineering? imaginary numbers are far more prevalent in EEE than in any other engineering discipline. i for one have just finished a 2nd year module in fluid mechanics and have yet been required to use complex/imaginary numbers. calculus yes, imaginary numbers no.

    edit: you should do some of your own research. attend an undergraduate open day. tour an engineering department if possible. from what you've listed: mechanical, civil and aeronautical engineering all involve force calculations.

    source: 2nd year civil engineering undergrad
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    MEng Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.

    Qualifys you for dual accreditations, IMechE and IET.
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    Mechanical or aeronautical! Good luck!
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    (Original post by Cataclysmic)
    did your maths teacher do engineering? imaginary numbers are far more prevalent in EEE than in any other engineering discipline. i for one have just finished a 2nd year module in fluid mechanics and have yet been required to use complex/imaginary numbers. calculus yes, imaginary numbers no.

    edit: you should do some of your own research. attend an undergraduate open day. tour an engineering department if possible. from what you've listed: mechanical, civil and aeronautical engineering all involve force calculations.

    source: 2nd year civil engineering undergrad
    ok mate ok, I did say it was my maths teacher who told me. I don't know if he's lying just to make me interested, but from you said he probably is.. he's a cunning man
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    (Original post by Cataclysmic)
    did your maths teacher do engineering? imaginary numbers are far more prevalent in EEE than in any other engineering discipline. i for one have just finished a 2nd year module in fluid mechanics and have yet been required to use complex/imaginary numbers. calculus yes, imaginary numbers no.

    edit: you should do some of your own research. attend an undergraduate open day. tour an engineering department if possible. from what you've listed: mechanical, civil and aeronautical engineering all involve force calculations.

    source: 2nd year civil engineering undergrad
    I think I'm the exception rather than the rule, but we were using complex numbers in fluid mechanics in the first term of our second year, but thats probably because were taught a part of fluids that's rarely covered at an undergrad level. In general cases I think you're right - complex numbers don't feature much.
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    (Original post by ilyking)
    ok mate ok, I did say it was my maths teacher who told me. I don't know if he's lying just to make me interested, but from you said he probably is.. he's a cunning man
    No, you can use imaginary numbers to calculate fluid flows. You can also use vectors. But I think it's simpler with complex numbers, though. It's just basic geometry, and you'll see this if you draw an Argand Diagram.

    Hell, you can even solve simple resolve the forces problems with complex numbers.

    (Original post by Cataclysmic)
    did your maths teacher do engineering? imaginary numbers are far more prevalent in EEE than in any other engineering discipline. i for one have just finished a 2nd year module in fluid mechanics and have yet been required to use complex/imaginary numbers. calculus yes, imaginary numbers no.

    edit: you should do some of your own research. attend an undergraduate open day. tour an engineering department if possible. from what you've listed: mechanical, civil and aeronautical engineering all involve force calculations.

    source: 2nd year civil engineering undergrad
    I think you underestimate the importance of complex numbers in applications such as dynamics, oscillating systems, resolving forces, etc.

    Of course, almost all calculations can be solved using "real" numbers, but "imaginary" numbers can make thing simpler.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    No, you can use imaginary numbers to calculate fluid flows. You can also use vectors. But I think it's simpler with complex numbers, though. It's just basic geometry, and you'll see this if you draw an Argand Diagram.

    Hell, you can even solve simple resolve the forces problems with complex numbers.



    I think you underestimate the importance of complex numbers in applications such as dynamics, oscillating systems, resolving forces, etc.

    Of course, almost all calculations can be solved using "real" numbers, but "imaginary" numbers can make thing simpler.
    if you have strong calculus the need for complex numbers is made redundant in fluid flow. it is necessary in EEE, not so much in fluids.
 
 
 
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