Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Tripled fees: so how many of you are going to go and study abroad instead? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    As somebody in my first year of sixth form I am, I suspect, one of many students in the UK who having been fairly sure that I intended to go to university a short while ago, now finds myself reconsidering my plans in the face of the hugely intimidating debts that going to university will now entail. As a consequence, I have been researching the costs of studying abroad and I must say the idea is becoming more and more appealing the more I discover. Countries such as Sweden, Norway, Germany, Russia and the Netherlands offer highly respected degrees with fees varying from £2000-£4000 per year. Not only this but accommodation is also, in the majority of cases, substantially cheaper than it would be in the UK. Frankly, I can see few draw backs, other than the time and effort involved in learning the language (even this is not applicable in all instances as some universities teach in English).

    Based on what I have discovered so far, I strongly suspect I'm not the only young student considering this option, so I thought I'd try to seek some of you out to find out your thoughts an opinions.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    STUDY aboard? **** no. Just work abroad for the ~30 years after and get your whole degree for free.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnHuman)
    STUDY aboard? **** no. Just work abroad for the ~30 years after and get your whole degree for free.
    :confused: Surely that wouldn't work, there must be some way that they prevent that from happening isn't there?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chucklefiend)
    :confused: Surely that wouldn't work, there must be some way that they prevent that from happening isn't there?
    This the government we're talking about, hardly the most efficient entity on the planet, and there's no PAYE to the treasury when you're earning abroad, you're simply out of the their jurisdiction. They lack the means (and indeed the will) to make serious effort to recover funds.

    I was VERY amused when I first heard about it from my maths tutor at college, but yes, you can avoid it paying the fees back abroad.


    ALSO, as an international student, there's no SLC/SFE to loan you the tuition fees, or provide you will maintenance loans. You'd have to pay your fees, upfront. I don't know about you, but most students who could muster £2000-4000 by the end of 6th form, probably aren't the one's to be too fussed about 9k fees they're only be paying back once they're earning over 21k.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AnHuman)
    This the government we're talking about, hardly the most efficient entity on the planet, and there's no PAYE to the treasury when you're earning abroad, you're simply out of the their jurisdiction. They lack the means (and indeed the will) to make serious effort to recover funds.

    I was VERY amused when I first heard about it from my maths tutor at college, but yes, you can avoid it paying the fees back abroad.
    I had no idea that it was that easy to steal an education. I wonder how many other people are aware of this, I guess it can't be too many because otherwise the government would put more effort into stopping it from happening.


    (Original post by AnHuman)
    ALSO, as an international student, there's no SLC/SFE to loan you the tuition fees, or provide you will maintenance loans. You'd have to pay your fees, upfront. I don't know about you, but most students who could muster £2000-4000 by the end of 6th form, probably aren't the one's to be too fussed about 9k fees they're only be paying back once they're earning over 21k.
    If I was going to study abroad I would have to work for a year first in order to fund my university education. Still better than spending 30 years paying back £30,000.

    Thanks for the info
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    You can study for free in Denmark. Copenhagen Business School has bachelor programmes taught in English ..
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Switzerland has low fees (500 CHF per semester, I'm guessing that may be 300 GBP or so?). In Germany some states have low fees (500 EUR/semester), and some have no fees. In Germany there are also "dual" study programmes at a few institutions, where you work while you study and earn a salary at the same time. For example sponsored by Deutsche Bank you can study for a (company-linked) BA at the Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht (School of Economics and Law) in Berlin, pay NO tuition fees AND get a salary of between 10 000 - 14 000 EUR per year depending on what you study.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    The Nordic countries have free university for EU students, with some degree programmes taught in English. If you learn enough of the language to find a job in a bar or something, you can pay for your living costs..

    Germany and Holland have reasonable fees, also with some English language programmes.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    You got the title wrong OP, they aren't even being doubled for like 95% of students.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chucklefiend)
    I had no idea that it was that easy to steal an education. I wonder how many other people are aware of this, I guess it can't be too many because otherwise the government would put more effort into stopping it from happening.




    If I was going to study abroad I would have to work for a year first in order to fund my university education. Still better than spending 30 years paying back £30,000.

    Thanks for the info
    It's true indeed in many cases. On one hand, for people who go and work in countries with high enough salaries when put against the GBP exchange rate (which depends greatly on the country's economy), they generally make their own ways and efforts to pay back their tuition fees should they choose to. I don't know how exactly as I haven't looked into it, but from something I read a long time ago, the government apparently states that people should (or "must") do this. Naturally though, they have no legal power to force you to do this whilst you are abroad. Technically, should they choose to sometime in the future, they might make certain panalties for deliberate non-repayers who return to the UK, however this has to be proved of course and as far as I know, there currently exists no such thing. The conclusion is that yes, even if your salary abroad exceeds the payment threshold, there is no legal way the government can force you to surrender your income.

    For people who work in countries on salaries lower than the threshold, just like in the UK they have no obligation to pay anything. An important point to make is that salary and it's exchange to GBP is highly dependant on each country's economy. Take China for example, where I currently study:

    In a 2nd tier city (i.e. a step lower than Beijing), one can currently make a very comfortable living on a monthly salary 5000 to 7000 Chinese RMB (approx. £500 to £700), including any and all living costs plus decent personal recreation (but will give very little or no window for any long-term saving). This is a common full-time English teaching salary for a low position - graduates with a BA degree and little experience. This is far higher than the national average for a Chinese citizen (approx. 1500 to 3000 RMB), and with this salary you can live by yourself in a decent apartment and never be short for anything. Better positions can pay up to about 10,000 RMB (£1000 or so) for really good teaching organisations and people lucky enough to find a company actually willing to give that salary. This doesn't even give half the yearly salary for tuition fee repayment, yet in the albeit extremely unlikely situation a new graduate will find such a salary, that person can live in a luxury apartment (in a 2nd tier city) and half enough money to live twice as well as in the UK if you don't bother with much or any long term savings. If you live very carefully alike what a fresh graduate might do in the UK, you can save half or more of that salary. Remember that such a big salary tends to be given to foreign workers employed in office for international companies. The reason why a foreign person can gain such a highly unequal salary compared to local Chinese workers is pretty much because English teaching organisations up the salary to what they feel a foreign worker would find 'acceptable', and because I suppose the supply of foreign English teachers is still not overly high.

    Anyway, most of the above are just details not overly relevant, so I'll get back on topic. My point was to just show that some people who go to countries like China can live in technically the same way one would in the UK, for a salary not even half of the tuition fee repayment threshold due to China's economy as a developing country, though you must take into account that it's not easy to get a full work visa in China or a company trustworthy enough to guarantee one for you.

    Now to get on to the main point, I study here in China and know a few graduates from the UK who work here as English teachers (legally on work visas). Pretty much all of them (3 or 4) have hopped around Asia, teaching English or doing other lines of work in countries such as Japan, South Korea, and now in China. With Japan perhaps being the exception (with the highest salaries against the GBP rate), most of the countries they visited provided a salary well under the repayment threshold but good enough to live nicely on in said country just like any graduate back home. I asked one of them about it over lunch one day, and she said that whilst she feels an obligation to repay the debt of course, a Chinese salary would never get close to the threshold - not until she was older and far more experienced, anyway. For the time being working in China, she ignores the debt for as long as she works abroad.

    So to sum up, and I hope my post hasn't make people fall over backwards, you can very well "steal" the education if you wished, perfectly legitimately if you do something like the above and want stick with it for a seriously long time, etc. It's really a question of whether you feel it personally better to do your term of 30 years repayment or to immediately do what you want to do in your career (assuming that said person wishes to work abroad) without being tied to the UK. This, as I said, assumes a person intends to do a career abroad.




    Sorry to make my post so terrifyingly big. I just have a lot to say I guess. I personally, and not really because of the fees, may choose to stay and study here in China, though I will need to fund myself somehow (you can't legally work whilst as a student here), and 90% my interest to do so is down to my girlfriend here and personal interest in China.

    As a final thing, one of my friends (American) is 26, has worked after graduation in South Korea, then studied in China with the savings earned, after which worked in Japan and married his girlfriend, and now studies again in China doing an MA. He speaks Korean and Japanese fluently and is learning Mandarin alongside me. Whilst those jobs might not generate lifelong savings or such benefits, that guy has in 5 years done almost everything I had ever wished for in my college desire for a career in Asia. Sorry, this bit is totally off topic though. But damn, I look up to the guy.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I wanted to study abroad and looked at some unis in north america and Australia (always wanted to see the place lol) but looking at their price and paying upfront, I think english unis are probably the cheapest for me to go.

    Although with people talking about moving abroad after the degree, I might move to australia, can anyone tell me what it's like?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    This post is a prime example of the extent to which people are overreacting about this..
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    You can speak Croatian, Russian, German?

    You go there- British universities are still the best in the world

    We will be devastated at our loss
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gemma :)!)
    This post is a prime example of the extent to which people are overreacting about this..
    How am I overreacting? :confused:

    I would personally rather live/study abroad and save myself £20,000. If you feel differently that's fair enough, but I don't think it's fair to say I'm overreacting.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KingofSpades)

    You go there- British universities are still the best in the world

    We will be devastated at our loss
    In actual fact, in any international university rankings table you care to mention, US universities utterly dominate the top 20.

    Should I go of course, I will so miss that unjustifiable British arrogance.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Whilst this is a good idea, you have to take into account that UK/US degrees hold the biggest sway throughout the world, hence the strong flow of international students here.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chucklefiend)
    In actual fact, in any international university rankings table you care to mention, US universities utterly dominate the top 20.

    Should I go of course, I will so miss that unjustifiable British arrogance.
    Cambridge is top; US unis come top (or maybe not) because they have 10 times the budget- hence why US unis cost more....
    • Offline

      13
      I honestly wonder why people do not consider Irish universities? :dontknow:

      What is wrong with them? (No language barrier at all, close by etc etc).
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      Yeah, but you'd have to pay it all up-front, as opposed to paying, say, £20 a week after graduating. :rolleyes:
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by KingofSpades)
      Cambridge is top; US unis come top (or maybe not) because they have 10 times the budget- hence why US unis cost more....
      To my knowledge Cambridge is top of just one international table. Harvard is top of virtually every other table. I think by the law of averages, Havard would be considered by most to be the best university in the world. In any case I don't understand why you feel the need to be so aggressively defensive. I am just a rational young person considering the best option available to me to give myself the best possible chance of being happy in the future. I'm not attacking your country, your universities or anything at all. So why the hostility?
     
     
     
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.