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Landlord's Forced/expected to Reduce Rent for Tenants. Watch

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    Apparently (and this is the case with my situation) our glorious government [sic] have sent word to the local council in my area to reduce the amount that people get paid in Housing Benefit. Landlords and landladys are expected to reduce the rent that they set for their tenants based upon the new HLA Annual Review.

    Because I am pally with the ex-mayor (still a local councilor) that this is true; landlords are being told to reduce their rates for tenants all across the board.

    "They are cutting back...you're going to have to ask your landlady to reduce your rent." he says.

    I'm annoyed because my landlady has to pay two mortgages (one for her own home and one for mine) and she needs my £100 per week. She's not happy. She's going to have to come up with the money herself to meet the financial demands on her mortgage. I know she is also struggling in this time of austerity, when she told me that she might have to cancel Xmass this year.

    Are we to expect more evictions because of these cuts? Already I am cutting back on everything so that I can live a decent living, and now they make these decisions which makes it even harder to maintain a decent standard of living.

    Together with the scarcity of jobs on offer - even the temp agencies are turning people away now - these cuts are going to decimate people who rely on benefits such as this. A mere £20 per week may not seem much to the government/councils but to me it is almost the diference between eating and not eating.

    I suspect, like my mum said, that the government are doing this as their way of saying "get off your arse and get working". I suspect also (taking into account the difficulty in getting work these days - my brother Simon has A-levels, ex-soldier and a mechanic can't find a supermarket job, and even he is finding it hard) that the present government has completely lost touch with the people and do not care about their situation, that they depend upon benefits such as this just to keep a roof over their heads.

    I suspect that this governemnt will be much worse than the last and will foment more rebellion amongst the lower orders to come.
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    Thats a good thing in my book.
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    (Original post by The_Great_One)
    Thats a good thing in my book.
    You wouldn't be saying that if you were being evicted from your home because of this type of reduction. :rolleyes:
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    It should pay to work not sit at home and claim benefits. I've never claimed any benefits in my life.
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    (Original post by The_Great_One)
    Thats a good thing in my book.
    How can you justify that as being a good thing in any way shape or form?
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    I'm annoyed because my landlady has to pay two mortgages (one for her own home and one for mine) and she needs my £100 per week. She's not happy.
    The government is not there to subsidise landlords in their commercial enterprises.

    Anyway, you apparently live in Liverpool. I doubt rent is that high as it is.
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    Very disappointed at the responses on this thread...
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    I'm annoyed because my landlady has to pay two mortgages (one for her own home and one for mine) and she needs my £100 per week. She's not happy. She's going to have to come up with the money herself to meet the financial demands on her mortgage. I know she is also struggling in this time of austerity, when she told me that she might have to cancel Xmass this year.
    So she's not happy because she is having to 'come up with the money herself to meet the financial demands on her mortgage'? What do you think most people do? If she can't afford it why did she get two houses? Most people can't even afford one. She will have to sell her second home to somebody who can pay for the mortgage on it.

    It looks like what she's done, which is what many people have done, is taken out a mortgage on extra property they can't afford, then set the rate she wants to cover it and taken in a tenant on housing benefit, so she's getting the housing benefit to pay off the mortgage. Then when it's paid off she has a nice asset which has been basically paid for by the state.

    The problem with housing benefit (which is also why it has some strong defenders in the property owning classes) is where the money ends up is as a means by which property owners can get the taxpayer to support an investment plan to pay off the mortgage on a house they aren't living in, so they can make a huge capital gain.
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    Also....how the heck are you in a house with rent of £100 a week when you're not working? Most recent graduates outside of London who are getting their feet on the job ladder could never afford to go anywhere like that. In Liverpool you can rent at £50-70 a week.

    I bet you don't pay council tax either, which is another significant expense the rest of us have to pay on top of our rent.

    If you have to move somewhere cheaper then thats what you'll have to do until you get a job paying enough to afford £100 a week in rent.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Also....how the heck are you in a house with rent of £100 a week when you're not working? Most recent graduates outside of London who are getting their feet on the job ladder could never afford to go anywhere like that. In Liverpool you can rent at £50-70 a week.

    I bet you don't pay council tax either, which is another significant expense the rest of us have to pay on top of our rent.

    If you have to move somewhere cheaper then thats what you'll have to do until you get a job paying enough to afford £100 a week in rent.

    I don't pay council tax because it is cheap where I live. Even those working only pay a small amount, so I am told.

    I was working when I got the house, but got laid-off last year. I'm in St Helens, btw. I think that there are many people (living here) who are renting houses, are not working and pay little council tax.

    And if I get evicted the council are supposed to find me somewhere else to live, but I know that the council have no houses (it says so on their website) so I would probably get put into a hostel or something. I would much prefer to stay where I am, if you know what I mean.
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    My family have properties, some of which are rented out to private tenants and rent in this part of Warwickshire has increased.
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    (Original post by D.R.E)
    Don't they have rent control in New York?
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    (Original post by Martyn*)
    I don't pay council tax because it is cheap where I live. Even those working only pay a small amount, so I am told.
    You don't get off council tax because it's "cheap where you live". You will get off it because you're on benefits. Those who are working will pay the amount as dictated by what band their property is eg if its Band A they will pay £900 a year, if its Band B they will pay £1050 a year, going up to Band H will be £2700 a year or so. But the cheapest will still be a significant chunk at £900 a year, which is what you have to pay when you are working.

    (Original post by Martyn*)
    I was working when I got the house, but got laid-off last year. I'm in St Helens, btw. I think that there are many people (living here) who are renting houses, are not working and pay little council tax.

    And if I get evicted the council are supposed to find me somewhere else to live, but I know that the council have no houses (it says so on their website) so I would probably get put into a hostel or something. I would much prefer to stay where I am, if you know what I mean.
    Well you can't have everything, I had to move out of a property a few of years ago because the landlord did up the rooms so he was putting the rent up from £54 a week to £69 a week and that was going to become a struggle to afford it, so I just had to move into a different house which was £55 a week. I probably would have rather stayed where I was but I didn't have enough money coming in at that time so I had to move. You can't expect somebody else to be covering £100 a week rent for you when you haven't been working for a year. And why does the council have to find you somewhere else, get on the internet and look yourself, its what everybody else does, find a flatshare with other people then its cheaper. If housing benefit will pay your rent up to a certain amount then you just have to go to somewhere below that amount. You have a budget constraint dictated to you by the fact you aren't working and are relying on somebody else to pay the bill for you. I know it is difficult to find work and I'm not one of these people who says all the unemployed are dossers who don't want to work, but its a fact of life that when you're not bringing in money and rely on state benefit, you have to accept a cheaper place to live until you are earning your own money.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    You don't get off council tax because it's "cheap where you live". You will get off it because you're on benefits. Those who are working will pay the amount as dictated by what band their property is eg if its Band A they will pay £900 a year, if its Band B they will pay £1050 a year, going up to Band H will be £2700 a year or so. But the cheapest will still be a significant chunk at £900 a year, which is what you have to pay when you are working.



    Well you can't have everything, I had to move out of a property a few of years ago because the landlord did up the rooms so he was putting the rent up from £54 a week to £69 a week and that was going to become a struggle to afford it, so I just had to move into a different house which was £55 a week. I probably would have rather stayed where I was but I didn't have enough money coming in at that time so I had to move. You can't expect somebody else to be covering £100 a week rent for you when you haven't been working for a year. And why does the council have to find you somewhere else, get on the internet and look yourself, its what everybody else does, find a flatshare with other people then its cheaper. If housing benefit will pay your rent up to a certain amount then you just have to go to somewhere below that amount. You have a budget constraint dictated to you by the fact you aren't working and are relying on somebody else to pay the bill for you. I know it is difficult to find work and I'm not one of these people who says all the unemployed are dossers who don't want to work, but its a fact of life that when you're not bringing in money and rely on state benefit, you have to accept a cheaper place to live until you are earning your own money.
    It is cheap where I live; the rate is low. £55 for a house!!
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    That was shared house in Leeds so it was £55 a week each. I couldn't afford to pay for a full house on my own because I wasn't earning enough. If you go in to a shared house its a lot cheaper.

    If you're single and unemployed then do you really need to live in a full house? Most other young people can't afford that. Why do you have to have the state paying for you to live in a full house to yourself! I'm sure you can find a cheap place to live in St Helens its not exactly Mayfair is it.
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    Good. Landlords have been keeping rents artificially high, as they know it's guaranteed income from the Government, so they charge what they want.
 
 
 
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