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Tuition fees in other countries Watch

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    I would like to know how our national peers deal with funding for tertiary education:

    France

    Germany

    Ireland

    Scandanavia

    Italy

    USA

    Australia

    NewZealand
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    I think Germany is free, but you have to speak German
    They're not in the business of educating students so they can do one after they graduate

    America is **** loads
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    In Australia ranges from around $4000 to 8000 Australian dollars per year, (roughly 2,500 to 5,000 pounds), the amount depends on the subject. Maths and Science are the cheapest, law, medicine, economics etc. are the most expensive.
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    Higher education in France is basically free -- a few hundred euros per year in tuition.
    The two most prestigious schools -- ENS and Ecole Polytechnique -- actually pay a high monthly salary to students, but that is an exception.
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    (Original post by NJA)
    I would like to know how our national peers deal with funding for tertiary education:

    France

    Germany

    Ireland

    Scandanavia

    Italy

    USA

    Australia

    NewZealand
    It depends what you're studying, tbh. France charges at some business schools, otherwise it is free. The ones that teaches in English are usually the ones that costs. Germany I believe is mostly free (in German), Scandinavia - free, except a few private ones but they are really not of high quality (countries like Norway and Sweden take pride in their welfare system and are focused to make the public options the best ones, always). Not really a high selection of English-speaking ones, and the students are mainly Scandinavian. They have really really good students financing, for both living as a student and for studying abroad, but you have to be a citizen there to be able to receive it. USA - expensive, may get scholarships if you're a minority of any kind. The rest I don't know.
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    (Original post by *Lollo*)
    ...Scandinavia - free, except a few private ones but they are really not of high quality (countries like Norway and Sweden take pride in their welfare system and are focused to make the public options the best ones, always)....
    They follow "the Nordic Model" of high tax and high social welfare benefits.

    This is more egalitarian but
    "Overall tax burden are among the world's highest; 51.1% of GDP in Sweden, and 43.3% in Finland, compared to 34.7% in Germany, 33.5% in Canada, and 30.5% in Ireland"

    ... which means that some Scandanavian high-achievers (and Sven Goran-Erikson) will want to emigrate.
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    (Original post by NJA)
    They follow "the Nordic Model" of high tax and high social welfare benefits.

    This is more egalitarian but
    "Overall tax burden are among the world's highest; 51.1% of GDP in Sweden, and 43.3% in Finland, compared to 34.7% in Germany, 33.5% in Canada, and 30.5% in Ireland"

    ... which means that some Scandanavian high-achievers (and Sven Goran-Erikson) will want to emigrate.
    As a Leicester City fan I'm glad.
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    Scandinavian countries are generally free, I believe.
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    (Original post by NJA)
    I would like to know how our national peers deal with funding for tertiary education:

    France

    Germany

    Ireland

    Scandanavia

    Italy

    USA

    Australia

    NewZealand
    If you're thinking of studying abroad, anywhere in Europe you can expect to pay the exact same amount as the native students. Due to EU law you are treated the same as them.
    France is about €800 per year unless you're at a "Grande Ecole" which are their best uni's, these ones are about €8,000 to €9,000 a year but it depends on your parents income and how many siblings you have.

    USA fees for public unis are still like twice what we pay here, but the private ones, are even more. For places like Harvard I think it's like $40,000 a year or something ridiculous like that.
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    I was thinking of fees for indigenous students.
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    (Original post by NJA)
    I was thinking of fees for indigenous students.
    That's what my stats were for...
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    What are the tuition fees in Etheria?
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    Scandinavian countries are usually free, but this may change soon as well. I know that many universities in Norway are considering introducing fees for international students for the first time.
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    (Original post by NJA)
    I would like to know how our national peers deal with funding for tertiary education:

    France

    Germany

    Ireland

    Scandanavia

    Italy

    USA

    Australia

    NewZealand
    I was reading this interesting thinktank paper on this topic a few weeks ago:

    Review of Student Support Arrangements in Other Countries – September 2010

    Their own blurb on the report:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    London Economics were commissioned by the UK Department for Business Innovation and Skills to undertake a detailed review of student support arrangements in other countries to inform ‘The Independent Review of Higher Education Funding and Student Finance’ (the Browne Report). Beginning with a literature review of the academic and policy work that has been undertaken in relation to student support in higher education and the contribution of students to their education, the report presents detailed information on the structure of student support arrangements for full-time and part-time students in the four nations of the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, France, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Ireland, Hungary, Canada, United States, Australia and New Zealand. The analysis is highly involved and includes an assessment of grants and bursaries, loans and repayment mechanisms facing full-time and part-time students.


    Interesting tidbits I remember:

    - Countries with tuition fees have higher participation than those without.

    - The US not only has by far the most expensive higher education institutions, it also charges for a lower-level of education than pretty much anywhere else, and yet has exceptionally high uptake and success rates (and multiple examples of spectacular social mobility success prompted by individual campaigns)

    - France's higher education system is crippled by lack of funding, a gap the government is unable to tackle due to fear of violent student retaliation.

    - Britain has very low returns from the comparatively large amounts it puts in to the higher education system.

    - Increasing fees decreases entry rates, but with highly-variable levels of impact.
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    I know in the Netherlands they are around 1,700 Euros a year (I am considering studying there)
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    (Original post by Flyer2010)
    I know in the Netherlands they are around 1,700 Euros a year (I am considering studying there)
    In Dutch?
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    In Dutch?

    Nope, majority of universities in Holland teach in English. Maastricht University offers the most in English (this is where I am applying to). If you want more info about it you can send me a message.
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    For any english student it's worth considering studying in europe now.

    You get the same fees as the country in questions students "mostly"
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    A student friend in New Zealand says:

    It ain't cheap, but it's still heavily subsidised. A typical year of fulltime study at uni might cost $6000 (~£3000), although it could be an extra grand quite easily depending on what you're studying. An international student, on the other... hand, will have to pay at least 4 times that. These days student loans are interest-free as long as you stay living in NZ until you've paid them off, and if you repay significantly more than necessary in a year you get some sort of extra bonus write-off.

    People complain about all the student-debt, but realistically if you get a loan you live with it and pay it off for the next few years of your working life (can be a good many years for some people). Sure it's there for a while, but it seems fair that you're ultimately paying for your own study.

    Student allowances are available for people whose parents have a low income. They're not to cover fees but to help with living costs.
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    It is also key to remember that many of these countries, do not have world class institutions.
 
 
 
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