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    Ok so I have an interview coming up and I was orginally going to wear jeans and a jumper to my interview

    But then someone I know said that I should go in a suit

    It turns our that there's a mixture of suit and casual wear at interviews


    I just wanted to know what's the better option

    or is it more about what Im comfortable with
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    wear a suit... always better to go too formal than too casual!!!
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    It was really cold on the day of my interviews, so I wore a jeans, a top with long sleeves and a warm hoodie. I noticed a few applicants wearing a suit, but most people were dressed quite casually.

    Don't worry about it though; I am pretty sure none of the interviewers even noticed what I was wearing - let alone cared about it! So wear whatever you feel comfortable in, as long as it's sensible
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    (Original post by BJack)
    The medicine admissions podcast seems to suggest that a suit would be a good idea for a medicine interview but they're otherwise unnecessary. Just wear what you're comfortable in (preferably clean).
    Interesting - what did it say? I'm not feeling terribly motivated to listen through all 20 mins. Everyone I've ever spoken to involved in admissions has played down any need for a suit, especially when they're actually forbidden for clinical students on the wards! I think there is some sense for medicine in wearing a proper shirt and smart trousers simply to fit what clinicians involved in admissions are used to seeing in medical students, but that would be the limit in my book.
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    (Original post by Huw Davies)
    Interesting - what did it say? I'm not feeling terribly motivated to listen through all 20 mins. Everyone I've ever spoken to involved in admissions has played down any need for a suit, especially when they're actually forbidden for clinical students on the wards! I think there is some sense for medicine in wearing a proper shirt and smart trousers simply to fit what clinicians involved in admissions are used to seeing in medical students, but that would be the limit in my book.
    We don't have a dress code but as a doctor you will be dealing with the public and I think a presentable appearance would be expected. [...] Dress smartly but comfortably.

    So no suit needed for medicine either, then.
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    I wore jeans, a morrissey shirt and a massive cardi to my english interviews, I felt a lot more comfortable than I would have if I'd worn the mini-skirt suit/high heels combo I saw a lot of other girls in. Just go feeling comfortable
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    I wore jeans and a hoody to all my interviews and I got in.

    I think what the candidates wear varies by college a bit though. I had my first interview at St. Anne's where about 25% of the candidates were dressed smart/smart casual. I then had a couple of interviews at Merton where it was more like 50% of candidates who were smartly dressed.

    Wear what you like unless you are applying for medicine, in which case I would avoid jeans and wear a smart shirt.

    Also bear in mind that the admissions tutors will not dress up for you. Instead they will wear what they usually wear which can be anything from completely casual, to fairly smart, to stereotypical academic dress (tweed jackets and bow ties etc.).
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    If Admissions explicitly specify that candidates should 'wear what they're comfortable in', then clearly admissions tutors will not/can not discriminate on this basis.
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    I would take something smart and then see what other people are wearing/what they say about what to wear.
    There will be people in suits but some colleges/subjects will say that the interviewrs won't be dressing up so they would rather you don't either.
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    In my experience, Oxford interviews are far more casual than at other unis - i was the only person to not be wearing a full suit and tie at my cardiff interview.
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    For both of my interiews (for music) i wore black trousers, black shoes and a nice top, but not one too smart/casual. The coat i wore was classy but i didn't wear a suit. I think it's more important that you are comfortable, but obviously don't go in ripped jeans and a hoody, esp for the really competitive courses! btw it's important to remember that the way you dress can change your behaviour and the way you think (it's weird... when i put on my black trousers, i feel all sophisticated) so you might want to consider that ^_^
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    If you're one of those people who are more likely to feel 'in the right frame of mind' if you're dressed up in a suit, then wear a suit. If, like most of us, you're more comfortable in something else, definitely don't bother with the suit - unless you're applying for Law or Medicine, in which case I would say dress smartly because you don't want to make your nerves worse by feeling under-dressed next to the other applicants (most, though not all, of whom will be wearing suits). But it's definitely not a necessity.

    I wore a big 1950s skirt and a jumper to one interview, and slacks to another - it really doesn't matter.
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    Having just had a session of interviews, I feel I am qualified to answer this. I personally wore smart trousers, smart shoes, a shirt (unbuttoned at top) and jumper (it was cold). Most other people were a bit more informal than me. A few people wear suits, but it really isn't necessary. It just comes down to what you feel most comfortable in.
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    (Original post by *pitseleh*)
    If you're one of those people who are more likely to feel 'in the right frame of mind' if you're dressed up in a suit, then wear a suit. If, like most of us, you're more comfortable in something else, definitely don't bother with the suit - unless you're applying for Law or Medicine, in which case I would say dress smartly because you don't want to make your nerves worse by feeling under-dressed next to the other applicants (most, though not all, of whom will be wearing suits). But it's definitely not a necessity.

    I wore a big 1950s skirt and a jumper to one interview, and slacks to another - it really doesn't matter.
    I really don't think this is all true. Especially the doctors/lawyers bit. I turned up in trackies and a hoodie.
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    (Original post by Rai)
    I really don't think this is all true. Especially the doctors/lawyers bit. I turned up in trackies and a hoodie.
    I'm not sure you actually read what I wrote. I said that a suit isn't necessary, but that given the number of people who do wear suits for those subjects, you might as well stay on the safe side and dress smart if you'd rather not feel under-dressed.

    I've worked at the interviews for three years in a row now; please believe that turning up in 'trackies and a hoodie' for a Law interview isn't the norm, however comfortable you might have felt like that.
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    (Original post by tory88)
    Having just had a session of interviews, I feel I am qualified to answer this. I personally wore smart trousers, smart shoes, a shirt (unbuttoned at top) and jumper (it was cold). Most other people were a bit more informal than me. A few people wear suits, but it really isn't necessary. It just comes down to what you feel most comfortable in.
    I'd second this - I just wore chinos, pair of brogues, shirt (without tie, unbuttoned at top) and a jumper, as it was cold as ****.

    Haven't got the letter so I don't know whether this worked for me yet, but hopefully! We semi-casual people seemed to be in a minority though, it was either people going the whole hog and wearing a suit, or people wearing jeans and a hoody.

    I wouldn't fret. I mean, first impressions are important but at the end of the day, if you're ace at your subject, no matter how much of a tosser you look, odds are you'll get a place.
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    Someone I was with at interview went in with a Batman hoodie and ripped jeans and got their deferred entry place, I wore just brown jeans and a striped shirt with a printed design tee underneath and I got a place too.

    You are sitting behind a table in most interviews so they don't see half of you. But it may really depend on the course and college for which you are interviewed. From what I saw, more E&M, Medicine and PPE students dressed a lot more smartly than the less competitive subjects. I was interviewed for St. Hugh's and St. Catherine's, both fairly laid back colleges too.

    It really is what you feel most comfortable in, if you want to play it safe then bring a range of clothes like I did and then play it by ear.

    Best of luck!
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    (Original post by pinky198)
    no matter how much of a tosser you look, odds are you'll get a place.
    How much of a tosser you are though does have an impact, apparently.

    And are you sure this large number of hoodies you saw are not just people hanging around in the JCR because they don't have an interview that day/until later? I'd be surprised if entering such an important interview so casually was the norm - the parents wouldn't allow it if anything!
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    When I went to my St. Edmund Hall interview I had missed breakfast and was wearing jeans and a jumper.
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    I wore some trousers (like this but green shade instead of blue-ish and a bit more casual), a casual shirt and a black pullover. Nothing extraordinary, really.

    There were some people in suits (one even was in school uniform), but most dressed pretty casually too.

    That was at Cambridge.
 
 
 
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