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    Hey

    I really want to study 3 languages at university, but most only offer 2. Out of the few which offer 3, most all have to be European languages, which is a pain when I really want to study French, German and Chinese.

    I've seen that Birmingham does it, and Sheffield used to do it (argh), but are there any others? x
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    You can study 3 at Newcastle but 2 out of the 3 have to be at post A level or equivalent level and at least 1 has to be French, German or Spanish. So as long as you are studying A level or equivalent of 2 out of 3 of your languages this should work out ok for you .

    Hope this helps!

    xx
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    Newcastle, Durham, Nottingham, St Andrew, Lancaster and Bangor do, although at Bangor they have to be out of French, German, Italian and Spanish.
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    Wahay, another French-German-Chineser! There's just the two of us doing that combo in our year group at Birmingham, haha. I think everyone's already suggested the places you can do it but if you've got any questions about the course, particularly at Birmingham, don't hesitate to ask me
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    Also Southampton :yep:
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    (Original post by ScarlettDangerfield)
    Wahay, another French-German-Chineser! There's just the two of us doing that combo in our year group at Birmingham, haha. I think everyone's already suggested the places you can do it but if you've got any questions about the course, particularly at Birmingham, don't hesitate to ask me
    Haha, cool! What's it like in Birmingham? I've read through the prospectus, but was wondering what's it like first-hand? It sounds interesting
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    (Original post by Kaloo)
    Don't be fooled, learning three languages is quite hard work, but doable - especially as you seem like languages. I say this because at university the work load is much higher so you have to take this into consideration. Languages are taught intensively on language degrees. I missed 2 weeks of my language module due to sickness and I was so far behind it was impossible to catch up, I got a low 2.1 in it and I had to study a bit over the summer to catch up again. So understand the workload. Also understand the employability after. Universities never ever tell you decent information about this, you find out after you enrol! Depending on what want to do, it may be good for you to do optional modules in say maths/business to help you get a job in big business or to show that you are numerate (which is important!) and you have more skills than just language. Maybe you want to go into translation or something after uni, but your choices may change and you need to show you have skills outside of communication (the very important skill I must say).

    I speak several languages to an intermediate level, and I learnt them as a child. When I speak anything other than English I muddle all the languages I know up which is really annoying because it means when I don't use the language for ages, no one can understand what I say when I speak them!! I don't mean mixing Spanish and Italian, but French and Hong Kong Cantonese :eek:. For this reason I wouldn't be able to study more than one language myself. I doubt this is relevant to you but I just wanted to show there many things to consider when learning thee languages. I know you didn't ask about the workload and the choice (and I'm sure you have done all your research) but doing the wrong degree is bloody expensive! I should have picked a different degree than what I am doing now but I can't afford to change!

    As for your actual question don't dismiss the universities who only offer two language degrees, many of my friends who do language degrees at different universities are on double language degrees and can take optional modules in other languages.

    Thanks for the advice- it's really tough, because learning languages is my passion, and I want to take those 3 languages into uni with me, but I know what you mean by choice and workload. One of my friends have said that she took Spanish from scratch, and within a month she's up to GCSE level. *sigh* choices, choices...
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    I disagree that doing 3 languages at uni is more work than doing 2 or even 1. If it's the actual language that you're good at then it makes sense to have more modules in core language and fewer in literature, history, politics etc. I personally find it much easier.

    That said, I don't think I would recommend studying 3 languages at uni. I was exactly the same as you - so determined to do 3 and I don't think anyone could have persuaded me not to. However, it's the same as with all things - with 3 subjects you are likely to come to hate or dislike one of them. This has happened with me and French.

    If you want to be a translator or to stand out from the crowd, three does look good. However, to be a translator or to really go places with your languages you need to know them thoroughly and I'm not convinced that even studying just one language at university level can provide you with that depth. If you're not sure though and just want a degree you'll enjoy, then why not?

    At the end of the day it's your choice and I think that if that's what you really want to do then that's what you're going to end up doing. Other people can only tell you about their own experiences. Good luck!

    PS - I haven't studied it myself but Chinese is supposed to be a crazily difficult language to learn. Maybe speak to single honours Chinese students to see how they feel their level is and then see if you'd be happy with less than that.
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    Oh - I forgot to say that most of my comments about the level of your language are to do with the limitations of the year abroad in that your peers spend a year in immersed in one language and you split it three ways. However, it is possible to have more than one year abroad, at least at my university. They don't tell you about it but you can defer your final year and they can keep your place open for you for a certain number of years. Worth considering.
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    What's the problem, join a double language degree and then do the third language in the university's language centre (most of them have one).
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    With many courses you can pick up other languages in your elective subjects - so worth looking at uni's with 2 of your chosen languages to see if that's an option. Might widen your selection of unis a bit
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    (Original post by emeleh)
    With many courses you can pick up other languages in your elective subjects - so worth looking at uni's with 2 of your chosen languages to see if that's an option. Might widen your selection of unis a bit
    I've been doing that and it certainly helps- thanks!
 
 
 
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