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Does Nick Clegg Still Have a Mandate to be an MP? Watch

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    The Liberal Democrats recently have become something of a single-issue party, whilst I agree that some may support them for their position towards the Euro or Trident, Nick Clegg received 27,000 votes for Sheffield Hallam last election, and I'm certain that 90% of these were for his stance towards tuition fees, which he pledged to scrap.

    He was elected solely because he was the figurehead of scrapping tuition fees, yet now with the mandate and power he received from that support he is now one of the leaders in parliament of a group increasing tuition fees. Doesn't this morally void his contract to be an MP? Shouldn't it legally void it also? In any other job, if you so quickly went back on the terms of your contract you would be fired. Isn't this just another example of one rule for MPs, and another rule for the rest of us?

    I know that the standard response to this issue is to reply that he didn't know how bad the economic situation was and how scrapping tuition fees isn't economically viable, I don't particularly care about that, a promise to fight for something is a promise. I also don't care that there are "compromises in coalition." He was elected almost solely to scrap tuition fees, if he was unable to do this with the Conservatives then he shouldn't have entered a deal with them at all, just because the Lib Dems lost the election and being in coalitions requires compromise, that doesn't justify instead fighting the exact opposite of what you pledged and were elected to do.

    Before anyone calls me bitter after being let down by him, I'm not a Lib Dem supporter and I never have been, I'm not even sure where I stand on the tuition fee increase. Even still, what seems more than obvious to me is that he has let his voters down, and he deserves to be called to account for that, along with any other Lib Dems who supported the rise in tuition fees. I apologise if this is a bit of a rant....
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    (Original post by Craig_D)
    I apologise if this is a bit of a rant....
    You should ask his constituency. As long as 51% of his constituency still supports him, then he stilll has a mandate to be an mp.
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    Maifesto promises are not legally binding though are they. It's not like he said if I don't do this then I will resign as MP.
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    (Original post by Kiwiguy)
    You should ask his constituency. As long as 51% of his constituency still supports him, then he stilll has a mandate to be an mp.
    Well indeed you're right it's a university constituency though and I highly doubt they'd still vote for him now.
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    Maifesto promises are not legally binding though are they. It's not like he said if I don't do this then I will resign as MP.
    Maybe they should be though, it's one of the few ways that respectability and accountability will be brought to politics. As I said, politics is the only job where you can lie to those who give you the job, and then get away with it afterwards; ironically it's one of the jobs where the effects of this would also be most damaging.
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    I agree with you that the whole tuition fees thing seemed one of their main policies before election so it's not really right for them to enter in to a coalition with a party with such different views.

    If I spoke to people I know or am around who voted lib dem and asked them why, I would be willing to bet the vast majority would either say 'To scrap tuition fees' or 'To keep the tories out'... I understand that they have to make compromises in a coalition government, and either way their vote was going back on some kind of promise they made (to voters or to the tories), but they knew this from the off, so why agree to it in the first place.

    I don't think they should have to quit though, although the NUS was calling for this thing the Lib Dems wanted to introduce where constituents could call for a re-election if they consider their MP has done 'serious wrong doing' so who knows, maybe that'll happen. I doubt it though.
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      he has mandates with David Cameron
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      (Original post by Craig_D)
      Well indeed you're right it's a university constituency though and I highly doubt they'd still vote for him now.
      What he lost in students, im sure that he might have gained some.

      Either way, I cannot say. Whilst his party and his voters still want him as their mp, he has the right to stay.

      Dont assume that students are the only lib dem voters too, there are other nutters out there
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        (Original post by + polarity -)
        he has mandates with David Cameron
        I bet Cleggie sits on Dave's knee in cabinet meetings
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        If I could have voted, I would have voted just as much for the possibly of scrapping trident. I don't think you can automatically assume everyone who voted is now disillusioned with him. I disagree strongly with the tuition-fees u turn but I do appreciate that it is hard in a coalition to get everything - I would still vote him in now if I lived in Sheffield, compared to the other candidates.
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        (Original post by BookWormShanti)
        If I could have voted, I would have voted just as much for the possibly of scrapping trident. I don't think you can automatically assume everyone who voted is now disillusioned with him. I disagree strongly with the tuition-fees u turn but I do appreciate that it is hard in a coalition to get everything - I would still vote him in now if I lived in Sheffield, compared to the other candidates.
        You're an exception. I can assume that because that's the way the evidence points. There aren't protests attacking the Lib Dems over not pushing to end Trident, but there are for them going back on tuition fees. Newsnight even described the Lib Dems as a single-issue party before the election.
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        Everyone who keeps bleeting on about how the Lib Dems 'have to make concessions because their in a coalition, blah blah blah' need to step back and look at the whole picture.

        The Lib Dems didn't have to enter a coalition at all, got into the coalition on the back of their pre-election pledges, knew what the difficulties in staying true to their pre-election manifesto would be if they entered into a coalition, and have made this U-turn despite the coalition agreement stipulating that they are welcome to abstain on this issue.
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        No party won the election therefore no party has a mandate to do anything.
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        (Original post by Aj12)
        Maifesto promises are not legally binding though are they. It's not like he said if I don't do this then I will resign as MP.
        they are in away, if you form government and you have somthing in your manifesto that you was elected on and its pases the house, the lords can not reject it
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        (Original post by Craig_D)
        Maybe they should be though, it's one of the few ways that respectability and accountability will be brought to politics. As I said, politics is the only job where you can lie to those who give you the job, and then get away with it afterwards; ironically it's one of the jobs where the effects of this would also be most damaging.
        Single most important issue facing the world today.

        I wish we could sack Blatter.
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        (Original post by Barden)
        Everyone who keeps bleeting on about how the Lib Dems 'have to make concessions because their in a coalition, blah blah blah' need to step back and look at the whole picture.

        The Lib Dems didn't have to enter a coalition at all, got into the coalition on the back of their pre-election pledges, knew what the difficulties in staying true to their pre-election manifesto would be if they entered into a coalition, and have made this U-turn despite the coalition agreement stipulating that they are welcome to abstain on this issue.
        Let's be clear, even if they were to become the government with a majority, they still would have introduced fees.

        They should have entered a coalition because that is their principle - coalition and compromise.
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        (Original post by Kiwiguy)
        You should ask his constituency. As long as 51% of his constituency still supports him, then he stilll has a mandate to be an mp.
        By that logic the majority of MPs don't have a mandate.

        Calling the Lib Dems a single issue party is a bit of a nonsense, it's a bit like saying the Tories are a single issue (reducing the deficit) party. They produced a full, detailed manifesto on a variety of issues, and crucially campaigned on all of them. It's possible to call someone like UKIP single issue, they might write a full manifesto but essentially all they ever talk about and campaign on, and why almost all of their voters vote for them, is the EU. It's not the case for the Lib Dems, for most of the people I spoke to tuition fees wasn't the only or even biggest issue. IIRC what cost them gaining seats in the election was losing the arguments on some of their other flagship policies, Trident and the Immigration Amnesty come to mind.

        And, speaking as a Lib Dem voter, i'm not calling for Clegg's head or anything like that. I voted in the knowledge it would probably be a coalition, I maybe thought Labour was more likely but I was certainly aware of the possibility of a Lib-Con coalition and I voted anyway. Now it has been formed i'm not overly upset either. They're the junior partner by a significant amount, and I can accept the gov't and the policies coming out of it should be predominantly Conservative. I think the tuiton fees raise was a huge concession to make and was imo too much for what they've got so far, but i'll judge Clegg and the Lib Dems by the end of the parliament. The government is certainly more liberal than it would have been otherwise, there are some (not enough yet to really please me though) Lib Dem policies and if they start to increase i'd definitely consider voting for them again.
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        MPs have mandates based on promises rather than results. People make a judgement on whether they believe those promises on a number of factors - including past performance.
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        he's still fit
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        Politicians lie. Such is life lol...
       
       
       
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