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Why is everyone so upset over tuition fees reform? Watch

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    I can feel the rage directed towards me coming, but still.
    Why is everyone really so upset over the reforms to tuition fees?

    Is it really that difficult to pay £1.72 a week on a £22,000 salary, or £15.58 a week on a £30,000 salary?

    Why are people trying to argue that those who don't have the benefit of a university education should be asked to help pay for those who do?

    It all seems utterly mental to me, and the whole situation seems to have got so far out of hand that nobody is actually looking at the big picture anymore.
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    It isn't disastrous, but ultimately people will be paying MORE back.
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    why is everyone upset they have to pay more money wow this isn't rocket science..............
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    I live in wales, so it doesn't affect my brothers.

    I'm upset because of the cut in funding and ema removal.

    It's very clear looking at europe that university fees could be much cheaper. We are supposed to be one of the top economies in the world after all.
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    Why isn't everyone upset that so many people cannot use the search function?
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    (Original post by cannella)
    Why isn't everyone upset that so many people cannot use the search function?
    because we're not all ****ing losers
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    It's the principle. Education should be free. Like the NHS and other pillars of the welfare state, it's just something that I believe is important. Also £9000 a year is a hell of a lot of money. It may not seem like that much if you look at repayment rates, but being saddled with £27000 debt just from tuition fees isn't something anyone wants to have. Of course people who don't have a university education should pay to subsidise those who do! Besides, they benefit from it as well; not all graduates go on to be doctors, teachers etc but a substantial number work in careers that directly benefit the general public.

    Also, the problem isn't just with tuition fees, but also with the cuts to the university budgets. Funding for arts and humanities subjects is almost entirely ceasing. It's a separate issue to tuition fees but also one which enrages me.
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    If people are in that much debt, will they ever be able to afford to save for a deposit for a house? Start a family? Get married? etc.
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    Also, whilst everyone can bang on about how poorer students aren't really affected... if you're not very well off, £9000 a year is going to put you right off.
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    It seems a bit unbelievable to me as well that all these students haven't stopped to look at the bigger picture. At first I thought they were just going along for the ride but now it's just gone insane. GET OVER IT is what I say. The lib dems couldn't cause a vote of no confidence could they, even though they made different promises before.
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    (Original post by d123)
    Education should be free.

    but to what point should education be free? there's absolutely no point in everyone having a degree - how are you meant to tell who's more employable??
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    (Original post by sweeed)
    but to what point should education be free? there's absolutely no point in everyone having a degree - how are you meant to tell who's more employable??
    Education should be free does not mean there aren't standards to acess it.
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    (Original post by BambieWambie)
    If people are in that much debt, will they ever be able to afford to save for a deposit for a house? Start a family? Get married? etc.
    Yes, because the repayments are so small.
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    It sets up a pretty scary precedent for the future.
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    (Original post by d123)
    It's the principle. Education should be free. Like the NHS and other pillars of the welfare state, it's just something that I believe is important. Also £9000 a year is a hell of a lot of money. It may not seem like that much if you look at repayment rates, but being saddled with £27000 debt just from tuition fees isn't something anyone wants to have. Of course people who don't have a university education should pay to subsidise those who do! Besides, they benefit from it as well; not all graduates go on to be doctors, teachers etc but a substantial number work in careers that directly benefit the general public.

    Also, the problem isn't just with tuition fees, but also with the cuts to the university budgets. Funding for arts and humanities subjects is almost entirely ceasing. It's a separate issue to tuition fees but also one which enrages me.
    Maybe it should, but money doesn't grow on trees. The economic situation isn't brilliant right now so I think it's probably the best we can manage.
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    (Original post by Jacktri)
    why is everyone upset they have to pay more money wow this isn't rocket science..............
    LOL, also your post count is 911. coincidence of divine message?:iiam:
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    (Original post by wacky9873)
    Maybe it should, but money doesn't grow on trees. The economic situation isn't brilliant right now so I think it's probably the best we can manage.
    Wales with an even more limited budget managed it.

    Theres no question we can afford it. It's a question of priority.
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    (Original post by Kerny)
    It isn't disastrous, but ultimately people will be paying MORE back.
    And this is a bad thing, why exactly?

    The simple fact is the country can't afford to subsidise the current numbers going to uni, so making the very people who benefit most from university i.e. the students themselves to fill the funding gap is surely the fairest solution, unless you're suggesting taxes for everyone go up at a time of recession, cuts to public sector jobs and private sector redundancy?

    This is essentially why the public simply DON'T support the students protest, even before they took it upon themselves to come down to London and smash up buildings etc. No one I know supports the student protest and I include work colleagues, family and friends in that. They can't all be wrong...
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    (Original post by TShadow383)
    I can feel the rage directed towards me coming, but still.
    Why is everyone really so upset over the reforms to tuition fees?

    Is it really that difficult to pay £1.72 a week on a £22,000 salary, or £15.58 a week on a £30,000 salary?

    Why are people trying to argue that those who don't have the benefit of a university education should be asked to help pay for those who do?

    It all seems utterly mental to me, and the whole situation seems to have got so far out of hand that nobody is actually looking at the big picture anymore.
    Well I share your view to an extent. The stupidity of the students coming up on the news these days is immense, even the NUS leader didn't look too bright on question time on thursday night.

    The one thing that gets me is when people say students will be put off from going because it is too expensive - how so? they dont pay upfront and they only pay if they are successful or earn £21K+ which seems fair to me. If someone is confident in their ability and wants to invest in their skills and knowledge, paying £9k for an average of 3 years course AFTER they are earning £21K+ should not be a barrier. It doesn't really discriminate against the poor since your chances of getting in is not affected by one's ability to pay at the start.

    The main thing im annoyed about is the deal with the Liberal Democrats. They clearly put in that pledge thinking they wouldn't be in government to have to push it through anyway, it was pure opportunism and there is absolutely no way they could have brought about a sustainable system where university education was entirely free as they promised.

    In my opinion a function should be installed to government to ensure that election pledges are not broken except in cases of emergency or serious change in outlook, and with possible sanctions such as a by-election.

    If the problem is about social mobility then I think it is much much much more important to invest in education at a young age across the board than it is to pay students £30 a week to carry on in sixth form or go to university. Social immobility starts at a young age and the quicker the government can tackle that the better - you would have less students coming out of school with poor literacy and numeracy and hopefully more that have the confidence to invest in their future.
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    because, simply, this year you will be paying up to 3290 a year whereas in 2012 you will be paying up to 9000 a year and thus be in more debt (around 60000 instead of 20000)
 
 
 
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