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Will increased tuition fees decrease the numbers applying for medical school? Watch

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    Will more and more people saying they're not going to university now decrease the amount of people applying to medicine in the UK?

    Will more people try go abroad to do it?
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    (Original post by fletchdd02)
    Will more and more people saying they're not going to university now decrease the amount of people applying to medicine in the UK?

    Will more people try go abroad to do it?
    Perhaps, but at least it will make admissions less competitive!

    Seriously though, the thing with medicine is that most applicants really want to do it, which means few are going to be deterred full stop.

    Whether they will go abroad is more tricky, and I think it depends on how people come to view these reforms. If the debt scares them, we could see a fair few go abroad - but if they figure it as more of a monthly-repayment, not many more will go than now. I doubt we'll see a huge exodus. And obviously, studying abroad can be expensive in its own right.
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    (Original post by Flob)
    Perhaps, but at least it will make admissions less competitive!

    Seriously though, the thing with medicine is that most applicants really want to do it, which means few are going to be deterred full stop.

    Whether they will go abroad is more tricky, and I think it depends on how people come to view these reforms. If the debt scares them, we could see a fair few go abroad - but if they figure it as more of a monthly-repayment, not many more will go than now. I doubt we'll see a huge exodus. And obviously, studying abroad can be expensive in its own right.
    I am trying to see a positive side to it as hopefully it will lessen competitiveness. That is the problem that people that apply are people that want to be in medicine so not many will be put down by the cuts, but maybe?
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    dont think so since one of the reasons why medicine is so appealing is becasue it guarentees u a job in the end and it is steady financially so it wont really be a problem paying back fees.. it may be an issue for grad applicants though since they dont get a loan or something.. (dont know much about how the financial stuff works in the uk since I'm from Sweden but I do know enough about med schools)..
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    I don't think it will for college leavers/gap year students applying to university for the first time.

    However, graduate applicants applying to accelerated 4yr and also 5yr courses will definitely be affected more.
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    Medicine in general isn't going to get less competitive, no.

    But what I expect will happen is higher competition for Scottish medical schools and (possibly) lower competition for 6 year courses.
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    I'm sorry but I disagree. The rise in tuition fees will obviously deter people from applying to medical school, be it undergraduate or postgraduate. Five/Six years of, an almost certain, £9000 is a very daunting idea for 16/17 year old A-level students.

    I think that postgraduate students will be more advantaged, as many actually work for several years before re-applying to university.

    Prospective students will be faced with an approx payback of £70,000, with the suggested rise in tuition fees. This is most certainly an issue, as even though there is a guaranteed job and steady income at the end of the course, it's getting there that is the problem. And once you have finished, you will be immediately eligible for repayment of your debt (due to the wage bracket you'll be in). This will mean that students will be looking at 10-15 years of debt repayment (maybe more).

    As I have worked for several years and wish to apply for Medical School next year, I see myself in a more advantageous position than current A-Level students. And it goes without saying that the most competitive of courses will be the ones that are able to increase the fees to the maximum. Therefore, the logical path would be that competition for places would decrease and more so for the undergraduate positions than the postgraduate positions.

    I think that this will be the pattern, for at least the next 3 years, after this the competition may well increase as there will be gap-year and postgraduate students who will have worked in order to subsidise their studies.
 
 
 
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