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Is there a list of EVERYTHING I need to know for Higher Modern Studies? Watch

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    So I've always found the social subjects (starting with Standard Grade History and then Higher Modern Studies), the worst for the large amount of stuff you need to know to be sure you can answer any question on any topic they put to you, and there was never really any real learning outcomes for these subjects, just that you needed to know about the different sub-topics. Nothing precise.

    Now I'm doing Modern Studies, I'm worried about the essay questions (and also the DME report). When I'm doing these things at home, I can find all the info, facts and figures on my computer and put it together in a structured way, so that I end up with a good mark for it. But we were given a timed essay in class about assessing the effectiveness of government policies on targeting gender/ethnic inequalities, and were only told that we'd be getting it the next day (so we only had a day to revise for it), and I didnt have time to do it, so ended up not being able to write anything in the essay the next day.

    Obviously I can't do that in the exam, and you need to know about EVERYTHING not just one paticular question. However, in our notes we had nothing about government policies on gender or ethnic inequalites, and if there was, then it was hidden under another sub-title with other text. Which raises my worry about the possibility of something like this coming in the exam. If these "policies" are hidden amongst other things in the notes, and along with that, there would be a lack of them, and I wouldn't identify them as policies, then I don't think I'd know what to write in the exam, even if I learnt everything in my notes.

    And there's more. Other topics too, questions can come up which aren't so basic. Like there was one in a past paper about assessing the president's powers. I think I'd cope with that ok, because there's a sub-topic in all my notes and revision books about his powers, and how the other branches perform a check on those powers. But as for more open questions on things like ethnic minorities and all the different things you may be asked about them, i'm not confident I'd be able to do it. Even the essay we were given home, I had no clue what to write for it, and found it difficult finding stuff to put in it and putting it together.
    Then there's the DME report. You need background knowledge. But a recent one was on Well Man Clinics (which we were given home to do) and I was able to find things I could say was background knowledge to back up my arguments such as prostrate cancer rates in men, etc. but these things are never covered in the notes, so how would I know what to learn for background knowledge for whatever DME question might come up, if it needs knowledge outside of the notes?

    Basically, a big long check list of things I need to know would be great. Like not just the topics and it's sub topics. But everything, like the different policies for different things. Ethnic Minorities housing, Ethnic minorities health, etc. etc. But I wouldn't have a clue where to find them, and like I said the learning outcomes are always very broad, only listing the topic or sub-topic, not actually any more specific things.
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    I don't think they actually tell you the specifics. If you were asked "What are the inequalities in housing?" ; it would just be any valid point given. This is taking my knowledge from Int2 Modies but I would say they're largely similar in some respects. In the final we were asked to "Describe the reserved matters which the UK Parliament...". I had no idea what "reserved matters" were because we were never taught it but I still got an A so I'm happy.
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    This worked for me in History - maybe it'll help you.

    Get all of the recent pastpapers you can find.

    Read question 1, then on a piece of paper write the general topic that the question relates to (Presidential powers for example) and then the context of the question (for example in history it might be something like "How effective...").

    Read question 2, writing the information on a fresh sheet of paper.

    Etc.

    Open the next past paper and on the sheet of paper you used to write about question 1, write about question 1 from this new past paper.


    After a while you often find patterns over the years, for example in history every Q1 in Paper 1 was about democracy in Britain. Once you've identified any patterns, write notes for each question.

    For example, for presidential power.

    *General info on presidential power*
    *Specific info on how to answer the context of the question*

    Do this for every question, then learn it all. Simple really.
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    (Original post by Delaney)
    This worked for me in History - maybe it'll help you.

    Get all of the recent pastpapers you can find.

    Read question 1, then on a piece of paper write the general topic that the question relates to (Presidential powers for example) and then the context of the question (for example in history it might be something like "How effective...").

    Read question 2, writing the information on a fresh sheet of paper.

    Etc.

    Open the next past paper and on the sheet of paper you used to write about question 1, write about question 1 from this new past paper.


    After a while you often find patterns over the years, for example in history every Q1 in Paper 1 was about democracy in Britain. Once you've identified any patterns, write notes for each question.

    For example, for presidential power.

    *General info on presidential power*
    *Specific info on how to answer the context of the question*

    Do this for every question, then learn it all. Simple really.
    That wouldn't work for modern studies as there is only one essay question for each topic except one of the topics where you get 2 questions.


    I'd say you're asking for something far too specific and massive here to actually say each policy that covers say ethnic minorities in race. There's plenty you could get. Unfortunately it seems like your teacher isn't good hence why you feel you've got a lack of knowledge. If you tell me each of the topics you're doing I could maybe help you some more?
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    This will help http://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/40656.html

    You will find specific lists of themes.

    HTH

    Mr T

    PS Not a Soc. Subjects teacher but if I was I would use these guides.
 
 
 
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