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    I am just in my first year of a straight law degree course. The workloads and difficulty are totally out of my imagination. On average I had to spend 16 to 17 hrs per day for my studies. Really exhausted and felt lost as, though worked so hard, I failed to perform well in all of my course works.

    I know as a university student I should not blame the tutors for their reluctance to help me out when I have something unclear in my studies. But I really feel helpless and have no clue how to tackle the tonnes of course materials and assignments.

    I wondered any law graduates here who had the same experience before can share with me the ways to overcome my present situations.

    Your advices are appreciated.
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      You shouldn't be spending 16/17 hours a day working. You can't be working intelligently for that long and it's the best way to burn out.

      What exactly are you having problems with? Be as detailed as possible.
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      (Original post by sleekchic)
      You shouldn't be spending 16/17 hours a day working. You can't be working intelligently for that long and it's the best way to burn out.

      What exactly are you having problems with? Be as detailed as possible.
      One of the problems is I found different tutors prefer different structures and approaches in presenting course works; someone accepts quoting reference from text book, some not; some said you should make your own assumption in answering a scenario questions if that is of significance but others said no. All these confused me.

      At first, I thought I was the only one to have such complains but later on found put many of my groupmates faced the same criticism from tutors on approaches and structure of their course works.

      Besides, as an international with mother tongue not in English, my Enlish language skill hinder my studies. I had to read three to four times before I could understand, or in fact I was not, a judgment of legal cases.

      I was wondering if studies in yr 2 will be even more demanding?
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      Perhaps try using different textbooks? Many textbooks are very confusing.

      The most important thing is to get a broad understanding of a particular area of law. When you study a topic such as misrepresentation or offer and acceptance or whatever, make sure you understand the general principles (and can list them in a format that is easy to learn) BEFORE you start worrying about the detail. If you are going 16/17hours a day (is this even physically possible??) you must be completely drowning in unnecessary detail.

      Don't worry too much about the personal preferences of various tutors. Just worry about understanding the law. When you answer questions, make sure you have a sensible easy to follow structure and make sure you ANSWER THE QUESTION. If you understand the law and you answer the question fully then you will be fine. Focus on what is important.
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      (Original post by jacketpotato)
      Perhaps try using different textbooks? Many textbooks are very confusing.

      The most important thing is to get a broad understanding of a particular area of law. When you study a topic such as misrepresentation or offer and acceptance or whatever, make sure you understand the general principles (and can list them in a format that is easy to learn) BEFORE you start worrying about the detail. If you are going 16/17hours a day (is this even physically possible??) you must be completely drowning in unnecessary detail.

      Don't worry too much about the personal preferences of various tutors. Just worry about understanding the law. When you answer questions, make sure you have a sensible easy to follow structure and make sure you ANSWER THE QUESTION. If you understand the law and you answer the question fully then you will be fine. Focus on what is important.
      Thanks for your advices. You are rght. I really don't know how far I should go in my reading. For example, when I read the case of R V Evans, a manslaughter case, the judgment involved another 6 to 7 cases whcih in turn each have another cases included in their own judgments. For the Evanis case alone, I had read more than 10 judgments of the cited cases. Even so, I am still not quite sure I really understand the principles of each cases.

      There were so many things in my head and I put down most of the stuff I believed of relevance in my course works. The tutotrs comment is, as you had pointed out, my works included too many points and lacked of focus on important issues and finally gave me a D+. I just don't understand. I wondered if you know there are good reference on examination papers with model answers so that I can grasp how I should handle a scenario question properly. I bought several Q&A reference books but they are mostly focus on analysing te approach rather than giving a concrete picture on how deep I should dig into in my answers.
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      You are going into FAR too much detail

      There is pretty much never any need to go into judgments of judgments. I can't think of any situation as an undergraduate where you would read more than 2 cases on a specific point (excluding dissertations / coursework)

      A lot of people manage to get a 2:1 (sometimes even a first) without reading any cases. Everyone learns differently, but I think you need to completely stop reading any cases for now. As a general rule you shouldn't read a case unless you already know what it says and why it is important. Don't read cases just for the hell of it - only start reading a case if you think you will achieve something by reading it. "Fishing" - by which I mean reading cases around the general area you are studying and hoping you will learn something - is a very inefficient way of learning at undergraduate level. Read about the case area of law in at least two different textbooks and only actually read the judgment when you are going into more detail. You MUST get the basics down first.

      I advise you to pick an area you are studying right now - e.g. the law of mistake in contract law or whatever - and read through the relevant chapters concerning that area in three separate textbooks, without taking notes. The goal is to gain a general broad overview of that area so you basically understand how that area of law fits together, what the key requirements are and what the key cases are. You should be able to write yourself a complete overview of that area in 4 pages absolute max of size 12 Times New Roman (better 2 pages). This overview should be systematic and list out the requirements for various things. This should allow you to competently answer a problem question (not an essay question) on that topic.

      Only THEN should you think about reading cases, journal articles etc. - but these are subsidiary. It is the first bit that gets you to a 2:1.
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      it helped me a lot.. evn i was sruggling...bout how to study, nd get them 2gathr.. thanx a lot
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      (Original post by jacketpotato)
      You are going into FAR too much detail

      There is pretty much never any need to go into judgments of judgments. I can't think of any situation as an undergraduate where you would read more than 2 cases on a specific point (excluding dissertations / coursework)

      A lot of people manage to get a 2:1 (sometimes even a first) without reading any cases. Everyone learns differently, but I think you need to completely stop reading any cases for now. As a general rule you shouldn't read a case unless you already know what it says and why it is important. Don't read cases just for the hell of it - only start reading a case if you think you will achieve something by reading it. "Fishing" - by which I mean reading cases around the general area you are studying and hoping you will learn something - is a very inefficient way of learning at undergraduate level. Read about the case area of law in at least two different textbooks and only actually read the judgment when you are going into more detail. You MUST get the basics down first.

      I advise you to pick an area you are studying right now - e.g. the law of mistake in contract law or whatever - and read through the relevant chapters concerning that area in three separate textbooks, without taking notes. The goal is to gain a general broad overview of that area so you basically understand how that area of law fits together, what the key requirements are and what the key cases are. You should be able to write yourself a complete overview of that area in 4 pages absolute max of size 12 Times New Roman (better 2 pages). This overview should be systematic and list out the requirements for various things. This should allow you to competently answer a problem question (not an essay question) on that topic.

      Only THEN should you think about reading cases, journal articles etc. - but these are subsidiary. It is the first bit that gets you to a 2:1.
      Thanks so much for your sincere help. I shall take a trial of your suggested approach in my next term to see if this will work to me.

      By the way, I am going to have my first term test on coming Thursday and Friday, 4 subjects in two days. The no. of cases terrified me. I find some names are too difficult to remember and to spell, especially those foreign names. How did you overcome this?
     
     
     
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