Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    got an essay on haemaglobin,can anyone give me like 7 or 8 points about it that i can develop and put in my essay?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    haemoglobin is a crucial protein for humans because it does its own homework and binds with oxygen to provide the chemical to the rest of the body.

    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    1. It begis with H.
    2. Want better info? Google it yourself.
    3. Go on, you lazy git.

    ...Don't make me get to 8.
    • Offline

      11
      Google.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
      1. It begis with H.
      2. Want better info? Google it yourself.
      3. Go on, you lazy git.

      ...Don't make me get to 8.
      your funny mate, i have googled it, i found loads of pages but they all had the same 3 facts about it, and correct me if im wrong buti dont think 3 facts would be able to make up and essay
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by icehockeydude)
      your funny mate, i have googled it, i found loads of pages but they all had the same 3 facts about it, and correct me if im wrong buti dont think 3 facts would be able to make up and essay
      I'm sure the whole point of it is to develop it into an essay though? So perhaps read around it a bit? What type of protein is it? Why is this required? etc.

      Also... If you tell us what you have found, it is easier to help and we can see that you have at least tried.
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      http://tinyurl.com/2alv4f8
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      isnt this homework meant to develop your understand of haemoglobin

      well first and foremost it's a globular protein, i think, lol

      google the rest
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
      I'm sure the whole point of it is to develop it into an essay though? So perhaps read around it a bit? What type of protein is it? Why is this required? etc.

      Also... If you tell us what you have found, it is easier to help and we can see that you have at least tried.
      i've got it's structure, how it's structure is related to it's function and what happens if the levels of haemoglobin are too low/too high
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by icehockeydude)
      i've got it's structure, how it's structure is related to it's function and what happens if the levels of haemoglobin are too low/too high
      biology is a bad subject. Dropping it tomorrow
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by icehockeydude)
      i've got it's structure, how it's structure is related to it's function and what happens if the levels of haemoglobin are too low/too high
      Ok. Which living species, or groups of, is it found in?

      Why might it not be found in some?

      Where in the body (of humans?) is it found? At what levels?

      Describe it's function at these different locations.

      What can go wrong? (Disorders) and why? What are the consequences? Can they be treated? How?

      Talk about the genetics and the evolution of.

      There have been books written on the topic* so I'm sure you could write an essay

      * = hint?
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
      Ok. Which living species, or groups of, is it found in?

      Why might it not be found in some?

      Where in the body (of humans?) is it found? At what levels?

      Describe it's function at these different locations.

      What can go wrong? (Disorders) and why? What are the consequences? Can they be treated? How?

      Talk about the genetics and the evolution of.

      There have been books written on the topic* so I'm sure you could write an essay

      * = hint?
      thanks for the help much appriciated andicant get access to books, there is only one library in my town and it's a load of shizz
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by icehockeydude)
      thanks for the help much appriciated andicant get access to books, there is only one library in my town and it's a load of shizz
      I know that feeling. Worth trying google scholar imo. It doesn't give you access to complete works but often there is a good chapter/ few pages available to read.

      Might be helpful if you decide to look into the genetics of haemoglobin... (Yes, I am a fan of genetics )
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      The name hemoglobin is derived from the words heme and globin, reflecting the fact that each subunit of hemoglobin is a globular protein with an embedded heme (or haem) group. Each heme group contains one iron atom, that can bind one oxygen molecule through ion-induced dipole forces.

      It also binds to CO. If too much haemoglobin is carrying CO (carboxylhaemoglobin) instead of O2, it will lead to hypoxia.

      The role of haemoglobin was elucidated by Claude Bernard, and its structure determined via x-ray crystallography by Max Perutz (1959).

      The haem part is synthesised in mitochrondria and in the cytosol of immature red blood cells.

      The protein globin chains are synthesised on ribosomes in the cytosol.

      It's needed to carry oxygen from lungs and gills to the rest of the body.

      You could discuss the evidence for the view that variation in haemoglobin amino acid sequences may be adaptive. For example, recent studies have suggested genetic variants in deer mice that help explain how deer mice that live in the mountains are able to survive in the thin air that accompanies high altitudes. For some reason I'm thinking about Gurkha people as well.

      Sorry to spoil the fun. :L

      It was a very interesting read.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by shorty.loves.angels)
      I know that feeling. Worth trying google scholar imo. It doesn't give you access to complete works but often there is a good chapter/ few pages available to read.

      Might be helpful if you decide to look into the genetics of haemoglobin... (Yes, I am a fan of genetics )
      ok i'll try looking on it and yeh i guessed
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by icehockeydude)
      got an essay on haemaglobin,can anyone give me like 7 or 8 points about it that i can develop and put in my essay?
      -It is the "oxygen delivering" molecule in our red-blood cells
      -It is a metabolic protein made up of 4 polypeptide subunit :2-alpha and 2 Beta
      -Each subunit has an heme group
      -Each Heme group is made up of a porphyrin ring with an Iron ion attached to it in the middle
      -Each heme carries a molecule of oxygen...therefore it carries a total of 4 molecules oxygen
      -It alternates between 2 forms in our bodyxyhaemoglobin ( fully saturated with oxygen) or deoxyhaemoglobin ( no oxygen)
      -It acts as a buffer by "sweeping up" H+ ions in our body when the partial pressure of CO2 is high in our tissues ( google for more information)
      It has a higher affinity for CO and Hydrogen, compared to Oxygen with makes it a good candidate as an "oxygen delivering" protein

      This should do it......goodluck.
      Offline

      4
      ReputationRep:
      You should try and get some information on Anaemia and other Hb disorders, maybe even HbA1c in diabetics. Could give you those extra few marks should you need them
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      If you are a chemist or biochemist add some chemistry into it. Talk about the chemical reactions between the iron and the oxygen i.e. oxygen acts as an axial ligand. Mention that haemoglobin has a b type haem, you could mention about other types of haems. Remember science is interlinked, if you do any chemistry at A-level link that in
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by int_applicant)
      -It is a metabolic protein made up of 4 polypeptide subunit :2-alpha and 2 Beta
      In most adults, yes. (Hint for OP ).
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      Talk about ligands and coordination complexes
     
     
     
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.