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    So , I've got a budget of £300. MAX.
    So no more than that.
    I was looking at the Sony A390 and A290

    I noticed the only differance was that the A290 doesn't have Live View.
    Would I really need Live View?
    Would it be worth the extra ££££££'s to go for the A290

    I'm currently using the FujiFilm Fine Pix s1800HD (i think) and I've been used to use Live View on that...Would it be a hard change do you think?
    Please help.
    and if you have any recommendations - please go ahead.
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    I never use live view, live view and auto mode are for point&shoot users. If you use a DSLR you have have a big bright(ish) through the lens viewfinder, so there's very little need for live view.

    Something like the ISO performance is far more important than live view.
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    Live View is the most useless thing ever (for me), the only time i use it is to quickly check my white balance if i'm not shooting in .RAW
    i don't like sony's so i can't help you there. :P
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    (Original post by BeckyDear)
    So , I've got a budget of £300. MAX.
    So no more than that.
    I was looking at the Sony A390 and A290

    I noticed the only differance was that the A290 doesn't have Live View.
    Would I really need Live View?
    Would it be worth the extra ££££££'s to go for the A290

    I'm currently using the FujiFilm Fine Pix s1800HD (i think) and I've been used to use Live View on that...Would it be a hard change do you think?
    Please help.
    and if you have any recommendations - please go ahead.
    Its entirely up to what you prefer. I suggest you get yourself to Jessops or a local camera shop, have a play and see if you could get used to using the viewfinder or if there is no way you would be able to use it without live view, see which youre more comfortable with. Also within your price range, I've just purchased a Canon 1000D brand new off ebay for £290, jus' sayin :P
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    People who are obsessed with high ISO performance don't value correct exposure and fast glass. Unless you shoot in a dark room all your life then it's simply not that important.
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    (Original post by dd1989)
    People who are obsessed with high ISO performance don't value correct exposure and fast glass. Unless you shoot in a dark room all your life then it's simply not that important.
    Learning how to use the camera properly in the manual modes is definitely the most important thing.
    What i would do for a Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 ):
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    (Original post by dd1989)
    People who are obsessed with high ISO performance don't value correct exposure and fast glass. Unless you shoot in a dark room all your life then it's simply not that important.
    Still High ISO performance is more important than Live View, Live View is one of the most pointless aspects of a DSLR.
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    (Original post by ReddDraggon)
    Still High ISO performance is more important than Live View, Live View is one of the most pointless aspects of a DSLR.
    ISO value is important but you should always keep it as low as possible so a too-high one doesn't really help you.
    Live View might be useful at the beginning when you are not sure how will you photographs look like with the given settings.

    I don't like Sony,OP, so I can't help you much.
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    I have honestly never used live view. I don't even know to to get it up
    OP, I'd go with Canon or Nikon, you'll have a far greater choice of lenses and I believe those are the better makes anyway.
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    I use live view quite often, especially with my mf lenses low light when I simply can't see what's going on through the viewfinder and I get the benefit of using zoom in live view to get the focus bang on. It's also useful for shooting in situations in which you can't physically put your eye to the viewfinder. I barely ever use it for serious or day to day shooting but it has it's uses and I would feel limited without it.
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    Im a photographer and have been for last 5 or so years now. I rarely use live view. Even when taking portraits. It is only useful when you are taking a very low down shot on a wet floor. as this way you can see whats going on without getting wet.

    One difference though, is that with a view finder you only see around 96% of the image where as live view you seen 100%. This is a minute difference though.
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    i use it quite alot when i want to put the camera somewhere and i can't look through the viewfinder.
    I have a sony a300 that has a tiltable screen so i sometimes put the camera on the floor and point the screen upwards so i can get an interesting angle but still get the composition i want perfect. It also works great in a crowded situation as you can just tilt the screen hold the camera up and get some pics over the top of whatever is obstructing you.
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    If I were you I would get a list of new (and if you are considering it, second hand) DSLR's in your budget and go to a camera shop (plenty of them around Birmingham I am sure) and ask to have a play with those in budget.

    When I was looking for my camera about 2 years ago I was heavily advised towards Nikon D40/D60 but they felt horrible to hold for me. The Canon 450D was okay but nothing special, as was a Pentax I briefly had a play with. I tried a Sony A200 having not really considered it and it felt perfect in my hands. Everything within reach, right sort of weight, comfortable to hold.

    Have you budgetted for memory cards, spare battery, screen protector, a case/bag to protect it? The memory card and case/bag are essentials in my opinion. Don't be afraid to try stuff out, ask for prices/an offer and to then walk away to research if you can get a better deal elsewhere.

    Don't forget that all Minolta AF mount lenses (as far as I am aware at least) will fit on Sony DSLR's, but you will have to manual focus them yourself and certain auto modes won't work. Certain accesories will also work, I just bought a Minolta right-angle viewfinder which works perfectly with my Sony A200, I have inherited a few other things which with the occasional adapter work too.

    Bottom line of this post, find out what is in budget from all makes, research future upgrades and if you feel this may limit you, then go to a shop and try out whatever is inyour budget and find what works and feels best for you. Not whatever someone on the internet advises you to get.

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    (Original post by BeckyDear)
    So , I've got a budget of £300. MAX.
    So no more than that.
    I was looking at the Sony A390 and A290

    I noticed the only differance was that the A290 doesn't have Live View.
    Would I really need Live View?
    Would it be worth the extra ££££££'s to go for the A290

    I'm currently using the FujiFilm Fine Pix s1800HD (i think) and I've been used to use Live View on that...Would it be a hard change do you think?
    Please help.
    and if you have any recommendations - please go ahead.
    Probably what you can afford at that price is Nikon D3100 that, despite its toyish appearance, works fairly well and also performed well in hands-on tests. Way a better choice than Sony.

    You may also want to look at this review: http://www.dpreview.com/previews/nikond3100/ The website has a good reputation, so you can trust what they say.
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    I actually have a Sony A390, and bought it in the New Years sale and got a free tripod!
    I haven't looked at the A290 to be honest, but Sony's are definitely the best value for money I've seen. I have used Live View, when taking pictures from weird angles, as it helps with positioning a lot, but it obviously isn't needed. It depends on other budgeting factors, as when I bought it, I ended up spending £100 more on insurance and camera accessories (bag, UV filter, screen protectors and a 4gb memory card for about £50 and 3 years accidental cover for another £50) so you need to take that into consideration. I love it at the minute, the only problem is the stock lens. I got the 18-70mm one, (it comes with an 18-55 for the same price) and the aperture doesn't go low enough. Stops at about 5.6, which is pretty bad for anything in low light. Not sure about the aperture on the 18-55mm lens though, so you'd have to have a look at that.
    For the price, you get an amazing deal though. I don't think I've seen any other cameras in that price range with a 14 megapixel sensor, and it feels good in your hand. It's a brilliant beginners camera too, as if you're in the menu, and you leave it on a setting for a second or two (for example, choosing white balance), it gives a brief description of what it does.
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    I'd go for a cheap Canon or Nikon entry level system with kit lens and add the incredibly cheap 50mm f1.8 lens too for low light and shallow DoF work. You can pick them up for £50 on ebay and it's a lens pretty much everyone will own at some point!

    Then just keep investing in lenses if you want to continue with photography. Both Canon and Nikon have an incredible glass collection. Expect to upgrade your camera body every 5 years (ideally every 3 if you want to stay current).

    I don't rate the Sony's at all.
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    I have the a390 and it's a very good camera. Personally I use live-view ONLY when I'm doing a low shot with a tripod on the floor - I use live-view instead of lying down in the mud to look through the view finder :p:
 
 
 
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