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    For some french homework I've gotta come up with a 1 minute long transcript/presentation about homeless people. I can take one of two opinions and I've chosen the first:
    What do you do when you see a homeless person?
    "I don't stop. It's because they are alcoholics or drug addicts that these people are on the streets. I took pity once on a homeless guy from my area offering him a small job. He refused!"

    So I guess that's basically the opinion that we shouldn't help the homeless. Bit extreme

    Anyway, if you have any points you could give me to contribute - because I am dreadful at thinking up idea points - it would be much appreciated

    You can even turn it into a debate if you wish. But I just need a one sided argument for the moment.

    Thanks xxxx


    Edit: Okay I'm starting to get negged here. Please can I restate that these are not my opinions I know that they are extremely harsh but I thought I would take a challenge to debate an argument that is not necessarily morally correct.
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    Er
    are you sure it wouldn't be easier to have a go at the other side?
    I honestly cannot think of any other reasons to not at least attempt to help the homeless, seeing as the vast majority of them aren't alcoholics/addicts

    i suppose you could argue that you'd rather not stop on the street, but instead volunteer at a charity/do a handout where you know that resources are being put to good use?
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    (Original post by theths)
    Er
    are you sure it wouldn't be easier to have a go at the other side?
    I honestly cannot think of any other reasons to not at least attempt to help the homeless, seeing as the vast majority of them aren't alcoholics/addicts

    i suppose you could argue that you'd rather not stop on the street, but instead volunteer at a charity/do a handout where you know that resources are being put to good use?
    Mm I don't know. Because I agree with the alcohol part - if you give money to them they'll spend it on alcohol, just not that extreme.. :/

    The other opinion is:
    "Being without a fixed home, that must be dreadful. Moreover this can happen to all of us. So I sit next to them to talk to them and give them money."

    Personally, I'd never talk to a homeless person (Doesn't mean I don't feel for them!)
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    Mm I don't know. Because I agree with the alcohol part - if you give money to them they'll spend it on alcohol, just not that extreme.. :/

    The other opinion is:
    "Being without a fixed home, that must be dreadful. Moreover this can happen to all of us. So I sit next to them to talk to them and give them money."

    Personally, I'd never talk to a homeless person (Doesn't mean I don't feel for them!)
    well, that's a bit of a generalisation

    o.O i understand that sitting down next to a randomer on the street for chats isn't all that appealing
    but i extend to you a challenge!

    http://www.crisis.org.uk/pages/volun...tmas-2009.html

    i did it last year, and i've done handouts with people i know and stuff

    one of the most rewarding things EVER, plus it'll be something nice for you CV or whatever
    my dad was properly angry that i had signed him up for a different shift to me, went off to his shift in a bad mood, came back and said it was one of the best things he'd done in ages
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    It's because they are alcoholics or drug addicts that these people are on the streets
    do you actually believe that?
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    (Original post by Pheylan)
    do you actually believe that?
    No, but for some it could be a factor.

    I was just given to opinions and have to expand on one.. I don't have a say in the opinions.. :/
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    Anyone actually got any points to express either one of those opinions though? To justify them or to explain them?
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    Homeless people have nothing. Human nature means they're desperate and have nothing to lose, and if you try to help them there is the danger that they'll take their chances and try to get more (take your money or possessions, conduct surprise sex upon you etc.)

    Helping them is an unnecessary risk.

    Or something to that effect.
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    more often than not i give what a can to um

    they need it more than me
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    Anyone actually got any points to express either one of those opinions though? To justify them or to explain them?
    Relationship breakdown is a big factor behind homelessness. Imagine you're in a good job, you come home from work to find your wife is leaving you for another man, she's kicking you out the house and your kids are taking to their stepdad. Unfortunately, this is not too unfrequent for many men finding themselves homeless. Then, of course, alcohol is used as a coping mechanism, you lose your job and end up completely hopeless and full of despair. Nobody wants to know you anymore. You're homeless now.
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    I once saw a homeless guy with a sign that read "$$$ for beer plz". Moved by his honesty, I gave him some change, as I had not even put my hand to my wallet that the owner of the bar we were in front of sighed and started filling up a glass. The hobo just dashed in for his drink, and I left with a smile on my face knowing that I had truly made someone happy that day.

    I don't know how you could fit in this anecdote, but here it is. Bonne chance, meuf!
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    For some french homework I've gotta come up with a 1 minute long transcript/presentation about homeless people. I can take one of two opinions and I've chosen the first:
    What do you do when you see a homeless person?
    "I don't stop. It's because they are alcoholics or drug addicts that these people are on the streets. I took pity once on a homeless guy from my area offering him a small job. He refused!"

    So I guess that's basically the opinion that we shouldn't help the homeless. Bit extreme

    Anyway, if you have any points you could give me to contribute - because I am dreadful at thinking up idea points - it would be much appreciated

    You can even turn it into a debate if you wish. But I just need a one sided argument for the moment.

    Thanks xxxx
    A friend of mine once said, it's not only until you hit their level and realise how it is to be homeless, that you will have tonnes of respect for them.
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      I feel sorry for homeless people, have never given money to them direct but would donate to a charitable trust.
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      (Original post by theths)
      Er
      are you sure it wouldn't be easier to have a go at the other side?
      I honestly cannot think of any other reasons to not at least attempt to help the homeless, seeing as the vast majority of them aren't alcoholics/addicts

      i suppose you could argue that you'd rather not stop on the street, but instead volunteer at a charity/do a handout where you know that resources are being put to good use?
      Yes they are, a study by the University of Cardiff showed that 80% of homeless people interviewed had a substance abuse problem.

      I remember going to Cambridge once and there was a big collection box strapped to a lamppost that said on it something like "85% of homeless in Cambridge would use the money on Drugs, if you really wanted to help them you'd donate to a homeless charity instead"
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      When I was homeless (for around 3 years) I would get other hobbo's coming up to me and giving stories of how they they were sleeping in the freezing snow/ Under a bridge/ under a truck everynight and then asking for money, not realising that they I stayed in the same homeless hostel/ BnB/ temporary flats (which were actually quite nice) as them and would see them all the time, even talk to them, but they were too much off their face to remember.
      They would then move on to the next person.I still see them doing the same thing.
      In the case of Dundee at least the homeless on the streets almost always have somewhere to go and are usually just trying to get drug/ drink money.
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      I had to read a book called "Stone Cold" in school a few years back and it gave me a really different perspective on homelessness. Its fiction and some parts are just for drama but overall its a very interesting look on how kids similar to my age are affected...
      As for your debate...well you can take the route of its better to contribute it to a organised group such as Shelter to make sure money is spent in a way you find more appropriate..Or say its better to give someone a warm pair of socks than the money for it.

      I normally tend to stop though, and I think you've picked the harder topic. Not just saying that because I don't personally agree with you but I think that you've already put forward the only real main argument (That the money will be used inappropriately). Its probably better for you to expand on that one point IMHO if you want to use this argument and want to get the essay done quicker.
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      (Original post by Adam Ben)
      A friend of mine once said, it's not only until you hit their level and realise how it is to be homeless, that you will have tonnes of respect for them.
      I'm guessing your friend was homeless at the time?

      I will ever respect homeless people. Nor will I ever help them - I have a thing about not helping people who wont help themselves. Also, if the tables were turned, they wouldn't bat an eyelid, so neither would I.
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      (Original post by GraceOfSpades)
      I had to read a book called "Stone Cold" in school a few years back and it gave me a really different perspective on homelessness. Its fiction and some parts are just for drama but overall its a very interesting look on how kids similar to my age are affected...
      As for your debate...well you can take the route of its better to contribute it to a organised group such as Shelter to make sure money is spent in a way you find more appropriate..Or say its better to give someone a warm pair of socks than the money for it.

      I normally tend to stop though, and I think you've picked the harder topic. Not just saying that because I don't personally agree with you but I think that you've already put forward the only real main argument (That the money will be used inappropriately). Its probably better for you to expand on that one point IMHO if you want to use this argument and want to get the essay done quicker.
      We read this too. It was actually quite entertaining... for a book. We never did finish it though.
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        One must consider the socio-economic reasoning behind the large majority of homelessness cases.

        A couple have already been mentioned: general financial hardship (redundancies etc. - studies show a large %age of individuals don't have enough savings to cover them for six weeks) and domestic and general abuse. Both of these cases, the blame does not land at the feet of the homeless solely.

        From personal experience, I would have been labelled and treated (by the local council) as 'homeless' last year, but not qualified for immediate/priority support. A revelation at home meant it was simply impossible to stay living there. Under the local government requirements, those estranged aren't highly regarded and as such you're pushed down the [ever increasing] lists for support. In such cases, these are the individuals who end up forming bonds with others on the streets and form mini-communities. Councils refer these individuals to various charitable organisations, but the nature of these organisations mean that support isn't guaranteed and you're constantly moved around. These individuals need stability and familiar faces and [although any support given is greatly appreciated] feel they're better off in these mini-communities on the street, as the bonds are generally very strong as they look after each other (whereas as the charities move you around, you end up living under the wing of other community 'king pins' and face abuse and coercion to other things, drugs, prostitution etc.)

        Given how bureaucratic councils' housing programmes are, getting help can be a real nightmare. For example, I recently read that certain councils (iirc, Manchester City) on their 'rounds' only count those actually asleep as homeless; if you're awake etc, you're not considered homeless and thus, the statistics on this issue are poor making the Govt's plans on this poor and not matching the actual level of the problem. Bristol City Council's housing department require you to fill in SIX forms to be put onto a system for housing support. As is always the case, many homeless individuals have had a poor and sub-standard level of education. How can you expect these individuals to fill in these various forms, and with many requiring so much information (various confirmations of ID)? And unfortunately, administrative support that homeless charities offer is drying up. And then there's the issue of funding for these places. If the govt. insists on cutting housing benefit and housing support, I feel we'll see even more people homeless.

        As a libertarian, I firmly believe in the self-fulfilling prophecy. If you want to better yourself, then you should go and find and seize the opportunities and make that happen; you shouldn't expect all the opportunities to come and land themselves at you. But giving the dwindling climate, opportunities are too non-existent and we're forcing these individuals into a cycle of deprivation. So excuse them if they use what little money they can get to numb themselves by drinking. Given the cold weather, it's expected that several of the older homeless individuals will not make it through; I hope we can see it past the poor (excuse the pun) image portrayed in this thread, and elsewhere, and consider the reasoning behind these individuals' very unique set of circumstances.
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        (Original post by screenager2004)
        Yes they are, a study by the University of Cardiff showed that 80% of homeless people interviewed had a substance abuse problem.

        I remember going to Cambridge once and there was a big collection box strapped to a lamppost that said on it something like "85% of homeless in Cambridge would use the money on Drugs, if you really wanted to help them you'd donate to a homeless charity instead"
        Do you really blame them for having substance abuse problems in light of the fact their sleeping on the streets, particuarly in the freezing cold, with all sorts of traumatic life experiences rummaging around their heads.
       
       
       
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