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    Hi

    im looking to seek a career in the Computing/IT field preferably programming so im going to try and get as much of programming material courses under my belt

    i see they mainly focus on JAVA, is it recommend to mix the Visual basic MT264 and Cisco T216 courses with this too? i would have like to learn C++ in the Building blocks of software (M263) and much more if there are, only because as i think there more prospects for C++?? your views?

    [B]my main question is realistically, what sort of jobs can someone apply for with these courses and after completing the degree

    New to this forum so any advice to build my confidence again would be grateful..i dropped out of uni in my first year 5 years ago studying compter studies which i regret and have been meaning to back into it and im looking to register for the M150 course in the next week or so... Thanks in Advance as i have searched this forum before posting question
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    Java is the core teaching language for the Open University, as it is for many others, due to its suitability for teaching the key aspects of modern systems development. Personally I wouldn't recommend Visual Basic to anybody, but that's just my opinion, so it might be a good course to take if you want a broader experience of languages.

    M263 does not teach C++, it uses a proprietary language based on functional programming, similar to the likes of Haskell and Erlang. However it teaches important stuff about computer science theory which is applicable to all languages, so it is worthwhile taking.

    Basically, you'd need to work on your C++ chops in your own time, maybe by replicating the Java based exercises as you progress through the course. C++ remains an important language but in terms of prospects it depends what career you want to end up in. There are still a great many positions for Java developers in the industry, although a lot of these are with businesses like financial institutions (although they do pay well!) Also worth considering is C#, increasingly popular these days as a sort of successor (but not quite) of C++. The advantage of C# is that it is much more similar to Java, if you know a lot of Java and a little C++ you'd have no problem getting on with C#.

    The important thing I think is that you don't necessarily need to pigeonhole yourself at this stage. Nearly everything you learn with Java is applicable in some for to other languages, as once you know the main concepts it is just a case of figuring out the specifics. For example I'm coming to the end of my OU Computing degree and I'm working as a PHP developer, but I got hired based on my knowledge of object-oriented programming and that sort of thing, rather than my PHP chops.
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    thanks for your advice..

    is java a good place to start?

    shame they only focus on this plus C# And C++ would be good to learn in my spare time but got to balance work and study..out of interest what areas did u undertake and in terms of career prospects is programming a good start with this degree ? what sort of jobs would be available? also do u recommend web/design to go along with my degree?
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    I've followed the B29 (http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergr...cation/B29.htm) degree path, unfortunately this is being discontinued but there are similar degrees replacing it. A degree in some aspect of IT is a requirement of a lot of graduate jobs, the alternative is getting into the professional world some other way and getting the necessary experience from there.

    I can't really recommend what to do specifically, that really depends on what you like and what you want to do.
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    Java and C++ are very similar. Learning one will make it much easier to learn the other, so personally I wouldn't worry too much about which one you start with.

    It seems like most university courses use Java. Its portability across platforms is an advantage, I suppose.
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    thanks both..if i have a go at c++ in my spare time is there a way i can show for it in term of a qualification or certificate are there separate course available elsewhere?
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    (Original post by Moschino02)
    thanks both..if i have a go at c++ in my spare time is there a way i can show for it in term of a qualification or certificate are there separate course available elsewhere?
    As far as I'm aware, for most programming/web development jobs, you would need a portfolio of previous work. You might want to eventually look at some Microsoft programming certificates (MCPD, MCAD, MCSD, MTA) aswell, but gain some experience first or they'll mean jack.
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    Java is the where the big money is these days. But it's an ass to program with.

    But if you want to become a good programmer, you'll have to be compatible with more just two languages.
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    thanks..where would be a good place to start learning additional langugages? i think i would like to learn C++ in my spare time. can you recommend any books as there are so many or websites, even the library? etc


    also i was looking at the level 1 course they have intorduced a new module - My digital life (TU100) NEW which uses a programming called sense as per decription is it any good? this course starts oct 2011 i think i will stick with m150
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    http://www.cprogramming.com/ is a good place to start, for books there's a big old list at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Recommended-.../1WDECVNPEW5TU but I've only read a couple so couldn't really specifically recommend one.
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    thanks again sunburnedcactus..

    im just weighing up my options before i need to register for the M150 course by the 22nd dec because i want a qualification something i could fall back on

    but thought i ask, other then the open uni degree- or going to uni (which is not an option)
    are there other ways to progress alot quicker ie training courses, fast track schemes? maybe in other areas if not IT
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    By starting with M150, it kind of implies that you have little to no knowledge of OOP programming/scripting and you're talking about learning C++ already! :eek: Seriously, one step at a time mate. M150 is a brilliant course, I did it myself quite a while ago You'll learn OOP scripting with JavaScript, binary and some computer theory. I would try and learn some other high-level languages alongside JavaScript.
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    C++, java, PHP even JavaScript all have similar basics. I'd say PHP is the easiest place to start, however, C++/Java will put you in good stead for anything.

    You will either have an aptitude for programming or not. If you think you do then just throw yourself in and you'll pick it up.

    For the record I started out with an OU level 2 C++ course. Very helpful to get things rolling. I also started learning PHP/MySQL on my own - that's what I do now
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    I'm very grateful for the advice & your opinions thanks,not to mention that I' m looking forward to the M150 course. whilst studying computer studies in uni the only aspect of the course i enjoyed was the programming but i did not hang about. i will be looking to learn more languages but all in good time
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    just require some further advice ..under the computing and it bsc honours degree There are five specialist options for you to choose from depending on your personal interests or career goals: ICT, software development, solutions development, vendor certification or work-based learning. can anyone elaborate on solutions dev and vendor certifixation in terms of career prospect ?? im learning towards software development but are the others im not sure exactly what they can offer me..thanks again
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    Vendor certification in that context appears to be the Cisco CCNA based course, which is based around their networking architecture, so it's good if you want to become a network admin. Not the most exciting career IMO, although you can make a bit of money once you reach the more senior echelons. The Software Development courses look like the ones I've done for the old Computing BSc, the stuff they teach is the most relevant towards general software development type careers, whether you're interested in software engineering or web development or other programming fun.
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    I'm on the same sort of development goal as you, and I have planned my studies as follows;

    At the minute, i'm taking M150 & T175 - T175 is teaching me how to study at university level but not much else and for this I would recommend it. M150 is a great course, and a gentle introduction to programming and computing science theory which I know isn't going to make me a programmer, but I can see its setting me up for something bigger.

    In Feb, I will be brushing up on Maths with MU123 to get me ready for M255 OOP with Java and M263 both of which I will be starting in October. In addition to all of these courses, i'm reading other books and more importantly, coding.

    Even in Javascript, you can think of a small program, write it, test it, add to it! For example, I wrote a little program to calculate how many tiles I would need for my kitchen floor, now common sense told me that such programs already existed, but then I get no learning value from it.

    There is no quick way to become a programmer, i've been looking for years before finally accepting that its something you need to be dedicated to and to work hard at in order to prove to people that you deserve the jobs on offer.

    Good luck with your studies!
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    C++ and Java are very similar syntax wise, so you shouldn't have much trouble picking up C++ by yourself once you understand how to program in Java. The biggest differences are how they work under the hood. Java is basically compiled into a special machine byte code which is exectuted in a virtual machine, this gives java programs excellent cross platform compatibility. C++ on the other hand is compiled into pure machine code. C++ also doesn't hold you hand like Java does, you generally have to allocate and deallocate system memory yourself which can get rather messy. However , unless your working in games development or on high performance applications, you don't need to know C++ if you just after a business programming job. You'd get more benefit out of learning a programming langauge with a different paradigm such as Haskell.

    Don't worry about all this vendor certification crap, most employers couldn't give a damn about it to be honest. At a job interview your potential employer will be more interested in whether you can code a linked list on the spot, or write a fast sorting routine.
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    Although the demonstrating the ability to work in a team and deliver on project milestones, be a generally well rounded person etc etc. is pretty important as well.
 
 
 
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