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    My results show that sucrose produced the most amount of carbon dioxide out of all the sugars. My hypothesis was based on the fact that fructose and glucose are monosaccharides and are immediately ready for glycolysis then they should produce the most amount of co2 in a certain time frame.

    However, my results show that the fermentation of sucrose produced the most carbon dioxide, any ideas why? because it's a disaccharide, so shouldn't it produce less?

    Also, really really small amounts of co2 was produced for lactose, in my preliminary trial, no lactose was produced, is this because in the majority of yeast, the lactase enzyme is not present?

    Thanks in advance! xx
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    (Original post by jimbob_)
    My results show that sucrose produced the most amount of carbon dioxide out of all the sugars. My hypothesis was based on the fact that fructose and glucose are monosaccharides and are immediately ready for glycolysis then they should produce the most amount of co2 in a certain time frame.

    However, my results show that the fermentation of sucrose produced the most carbon dioxide, any ideas why? because it's a disaccharide, so shouldn't it produce less?

    Also, really really small amounts of co2 was produced for lactose, in my preliminary trial, no lactose was produced, is this because in the majority of yeast, the lactase enzyme is not present?

    Thanks in advance! xx
    Is this A-level Biology? Can you explain how you get the CO2 out, in my book, all thats mentioned is hydrolysis. The disaccharide sucrose is glucose and fructose put together correct? So in theory, it is the larger molecule and therefore contains more carbon than the other two. I would think that sucrose gives its CO2 off more slowly aswell, because glucose has less bonding, so its easier to split up. So yes, glucose will produce more CO2 in a certain time frame like you said, but if you keep heating them both, sucrose will produce more CO2.

    Hope this helps, feel free to quote me if you dont understand/have any queries/I got something wrong
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Is this A-level Biology? Can you explain how you get the CO2 out, in my book, all thats mentioned is hydrolysis. The disaccharide sucrose is glucose and fructose put together correct? So in theory, it is the larger molecule and therefore contains more carbon than the other two. I would think that sucrose gives its CO2 off more slowly aswell, because glucose has less bonding, so its easier to split up. So yes, glucose will produce more CO2 in a certain time frame like you said, but if you keep heating them both, sucrose will produce more CO2.

    Hope this helps, feel free to quote me if you dont understand/have any queries/I got something wrong
    Thanks! You get CO2 because:

    C6H12O6 (s) --> 2C2H5OH (aq) + 2CO2 (g)

    Yep, this is for my A2 coursework. Since, I'm measuring the volume of carbon dioxide released from each sugar that is fermented, do you have an idea what statistical test I should use?
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    (Original post by jimbob_)
    Thanks! You get CO2 because:

    C6H12O6 (s) --> 2C2H5OH (aq) + 2CO2 (g)

    Yep, this is for my A2 coursework. Since, I'm measuring the volume of carbon dioxide released from each sugar that is fermented, do you have an idea what statistical test I should use?
    Ahh yes I remember now, hence fermentation haha. Well, I'm not quite sure about what your experiment is trying to work out, a correlation or significant difference from expected(either error bars or spearmans rank I think). The only 3 I know are spearmans rank, chi squared and 95% confidence limits. Here's a link to a file on the AQA website which helps explain which one you should use, and you can decide for yourself

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/gce/pdf...-TRB-OGSSS.PDF

    Clearly you're doing edexcel, so I heard theres another statistics test which you can do, but this is just for help, nothing to do with AQA in all fairness
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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Ahh yes I remember now, hence fermentation haha. Well, I'm not quite sure about what your experiment is trying to work out, a correlation or significant difference from expected(either error bars or spearmans rank I think). The only 3 I know are spearmans rank, chi squared and 95% confidence limits. Here's a link to a file on the AQA website which helps explain which one you should use, and you can decide for yourself

    http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/gce/pdf...-TRB-OGSSS.PDF

    Clearly you're doing edexcel, so I heard theres another statistics test which you can do, but this is just for help, nothing to do with AQA in all fairness
    Thanks for your help but I asked my teacher what test I should use, he suggested a test of difference, so I'm using the Whitney U test. My experiment is which sugar i.e. what substrate is the best to produce the maximum yield of ethanol. So, it requires a test of differences. Thanks for your help though!
 
 
 
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