Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Windows 7 - Which One For Gaming? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey,

    OK, so the story is, I just upgraded my semi-gaming PC from a 8800GT to a HD4870. I also ordered me a new 500GB HDD, and was going to slap Windows XP onto it like before. But then I thought... Seen as I just ordered a separate HDD, why not use it exclusively for gaming, and use my current 250GB HDD as my daily user. (Windows XP FTW! :cool:)

    The reason I'm considering Windows 7 is:

    1) Some games are now excluding Windows XP from their requirements. (Just Cause 2's the first.)
    2) Windows 7 has support for DX10/11. (New GPU supports DX10.1)
    3) I can get the 64-Bit edition and make use of the extra gig of RAM. (Currently seeing 3GB's due to 32-Bit.)

    Which Windows 7 should I be looking to get, which uses the least amount of resources, or returns the best performance for gaming? Also, would the 64-Bit be more of a hog, then the 32-Bit? (seen as no games utilize more then 2GB's of RAM, I don't really see the need to go 64-Bit if its going to be a hog itself.) I was going to go with Windows 7 Basic, but I'm not too sure seen as I don't know much about Vista/7, and I've seen a few people using Ultimate on their gaming rigs, and was wondering if its due to any performance gains they may be getting.

    System specs are:

    CPU: E7500 @ 3.2Ghz - OC'd on air - [3MB Cache, 1066Mhz]
    RAM: 2 x 2GB DDR2 800Mhz Dual Channel
    GPU: HD4870 OC'd Edition

    Thanks!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Marviee)
    Hey,

    OK, so the story is, I just upgraded my semi-gaming PC from a 8800GT to a HD4870. I also ordered me a new 500GB HDD, and was going to slap Windows XP onto it like before. But then I thought... Seen as I just ordered a separate HDD, why not use it exclusively for gaming, and use my current 250GB HDD as my daily user. (Windows XP FTW! :cool:)

    The reason/s I'm considering Windows 7 are:

    1) Some games are now excluding Windows XP from their requirements. (Just Cause 2's the first.)
    2) Windows 7 has support for DX10/11. (New GPU supports DX10.1)
    3) I can get the 64-Bit edition and make use of the extra gig of RAM. (Currently seeing 3GB's due to 32-Bit.)

    Alright, so... Which is the Windows 7 should I get, that uses the least amount of resources, or returns the best performance for gaming? Also, would the 64-Bit be more of a hog, then the 32-Bit? (seen as no games utilize more then 2GB's of RAM, I don't really see the need to go 64-Bit if its going to be a hog itself.) I was going to go with Windows 7 Basic, but I'm not too sure seen as I don't know much about Vista/7, and I've seen people go for Ultimate for gaming, and I was wondering if its due to any performance gains they may be getting.

    System specs are:

    CPU: E7500 @ 3.2Ghz - OC'd on air - [3MB Cache, 1066Mhz]
    RAM: 2 x 2GB DDR2 800Mhz Dual Channel
    GPU: HD4870 OC'd Edition

    Thanks!
    I would recommend, the Windows 7 Professional from personal experience.

    As far as 64 vs 32 bit is concerned, if your total amount of ram is 4Gb or greater, it is recommended that you use the 64bit version as it has better memory management.

    All in All its time to leave XP
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kingxlr8)
    All in All its time to leave XP
    Nah, I'm XP till 2014 son :cool:

    As I said, it's going to be installed on a separate HDD for gaming only, and I need it to be the right one.

    Edit: Looks like Windows 7 Basic does not support 64-Bit. The lowest I could find is Home Premium. Correct me if I'm wrong.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I run Win7 Pro (64-bit). I run high-end games just fine - but I don't have another edition of Win7 to directly compare to I'm afraid!

    BTW, while you're buying hard drives, thought I'd mention that I currently have ~360Gb of games installed... you might want some more headroom
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThePants999)
    I run Win7 Pro (64-bit). I run high-end games just fine - but I don't have another edition of Win7 to directly compare to I'm afraid!

    BTW, while you're buying hard drives, thought I'd mention that I currently have ~360Gb of games installed... you might want some more headroom
    Ohh... I did find a 1.5TB HDD for only £46 but the problem is, it was more of a storage HDD then anything. (small cache, and only 5,400RPM etc.)

    500GB should be more then enough. 12GB (average) x 40 games = 480GB. Most games are way below this figure, so I shouldn't have any problems any time soon.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Home premium 64bit is usually the one to go for, though perhaps XP mode (basically a VM) in the professional version could tempt you away from your current OS? I'm always surprised to see people clinging on to XP- it makes terrible use of modern hardware: if you have 4GB of RAM, you want 4GB to be used; not for the OS to use 512MB and then start sticking stuff into the page file, and if you have a modern graphics card why on earth would you choose a system where the UI is drawn entirely by the CPU, causing spikes in processor usage whenever you move windows around? Add to that the fact that it's possibly the least secure operating system of modern times and the growing list of incompatible programs (even the latest version of internet explorer is incompatible) and its a wonder anyone still uses it at all.
    As for the hard drive, the same drive is always recommended and for good reason: get the Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB: it's only £40 and it's exceptionally fast, and a decent size.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Don't bother with Ultimate.

    If you're wanting to play older games you might consider Professional due to the neat integration of "Windows XP Compatibility" mode.

    If you're only going to play new games then Home will do the job.

    Oh and if you have 4GB+ of RAM go for 64-bit version.

    Bear in mind Win7 will eat 2GB of your RAM if running 64-bit.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xXedixXx)
    Bear in mind Win7 will eat 2GB of your RAM if running 64-bit.
    Ohh... :eek:
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by somebody else)
    Home premium 64bit is usually the one to go for, though perhaps XP mode (basically a VM) in the professional version could tempt you away from your current OS? I'm always surprised to see people clinging on to XP- it makes terrible use of modern hardware: if you have 4GB of RAM, you want 4GB to be used; not for the OS to use 512MB and then start sticking stuff into the page file, and if you have a modern graphics card why on earth would you choose a system where the UI is drawn entirely by the CPU, causing spikes in processor usage whenever you move windows around? Add to that the fact that it's possibly the least secure operating system of modern times and the growing list of incompatible programs (even the latest version of internet explorer is incompatible) and its a wonder anyone still uses it at all.
    As for the hard drive, the same drive is always recommended and for good reason: get the Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB: it's only £40 and it's exceptionally fast, and a decent size.
    Don't take this in the wrong way, but windows XP is just fine where it is. I'm still using Windows XP on my Pentium 4 machine and it runs smoothly, with no spikes at all. (hell, I'm on it right now ) I've been using it for 6 years straight and have no complaints what so ever. I don't see why I should upgrade something that's still functions.

    Oh, and I may have 4GB of RAM, but I have never really, in my entire life, needed THAT much RAM on a daily basis. Infact, the most I've ever seen is around 1.2GB's being used, and I think I was playing MW at the time.

    Anyway's, Instead of having to switch between two computers, I thought I'd just stick 2 HDD's into the gaming rig I was building, and only switch between OS's instead. As much as you claim XP is bad, it's something that suits me well, and I don't see anything that Windows 7 has to offer that will some how make my day-to-day usage any easier then using XP. (being obsolete is not a reason to switch. )

    That HDD you suggested looks sweet, but I ordered a 500GB seagate of ebay for £31. O well, better luck next time.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Marviee)
    I don't see anything that Windows 7 has to offer that will some how make my day-to-day usage any easier then using XP.
    Win7 won't make it easier but it does come with DirectX 11, which as a gamer, you may want to utilise.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xXedixXx)
    Win7 won't make it easier but it does come with DirectX 11, which as a gamer, you may want to utilise.
    I know, thats why I'm installing it on the gaming HDD. But I wouldn't be able to use it if I tried anyway, seen as the HD4870 only supports DX10.1.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Get Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit, it's the best option for you I think.

    And I don't see why you'd still be using XP as your main OS... It's not like back when Vista was around, Windows 7 is genuinely better than XP.. I barely ever see any enthusiasts on XP still, the only thing it's useful for is suicide runs/benching runs for some apps.

    The whole user experience of Windows 7 is much better than XP, things like the new taskbar for example, as well as almost every other aspect of managing your PC has been improved.

    And you should have got a Samsung F3 1TB, it'll be a LOT faster than your 500GB hard drive, especially if you short stroked it
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xXedixXx)
    Bear in mind Win7 will eat 2GB of your RAM if running 64-bit.
    Can anyone confirm this please? Because I'm having serious doubts have getting 64-Bit if this is true.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Wow talk about over analysing something

    Just get Win7 64 bit if you have 4GB or over.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dzeh)
    Wow talk about over analysing something

    Just get Win7 64 bit if you have 4GB or over.
    No, don't that's not very wise considering the amount of RAM the 64-bit version uses.

    (Original post by Marviee)
    Can anyone confirm this please? Because I'm having serious doubts have getting 64-Bit if this is true.
    Here: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/w...m-requirements
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Marviee)
    Can anyone confirm this please? Because I'm having serious doubts have getting 64-Bit if this is true.
    In general, Windows 7 will eat as much RAM as you give it, which is exactly how it should be. With 2GB of RAM it uses less than half that, with 4GB it'll use between 1 and 2, give it 8GB and it uses between 2 and 3, and the rest of the memory is still used for caching frequently/recently used data and code. Given the relative speed of RAM and hard drive storage, why would you want most of your expensive, fast memory sitting idle while stuff was swapped into and out of the disk?
    Edit: if it helps allay your fears, I've just opened firefox (10 tabs full of images and videos), Battlefield BC2, word, excel, powerpoint, visual studio 2010, itunes, steam and vmware workstation with a virtual machine powered up and allocated 512MB, and in total just over 2900MB of RAM is in use.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by somebody else)
    In general, Windows 7 will eat as much RAM as you give it, which is exactly how it should be. With 2GB of RAM it uses less than half that, with 4GB it'll use between 1 and 2, give it 8GB and it uses between 2 and 3, and the rest of the memory is still used for caching frequently/recently used data and code. Given the relative speed of RAM and hard drive storage, why would you want most of your expensive, fast memory sitting idle while stuff was swapped into and out of the disk?
    Edit: if it helps allay your fears, I've just opened firefox (10 tabs full of images and videos), Battlefield BC2, word, excel, powerpoint, visual studio 2010, itunes, steam and vmware workstation with a virtual machine powered up and allocated 512MB, and in total just over 2900MB of RAM is in use.
    Very true, the world of RAM consumption can be quite misleading. I probably wouldn't bother with 64-bit for a 4GB system however I am getting 64 bit for my 6GB system.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xXedixXx)
    No, don't that's not very wise considering the amount of RAM the 64-bit version uses.

    Here: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/w...m-requirements
    RAM that is not being used is wasted RAM.
    Since Vista, Windows makes heavy use of RAM to speed up common tasks and applications (instead of having to load everything from disk all the time, some parts are stored in RAM).
    So in effect, Windows 7 x64 using half your RAM is actually a good thing.

    End result:
    Unless you have older hardware that may have some issues, and as long as you have over 2GB of RAM, you should always go for x64.
    • Offline

      14
      Use professional on windows 7 its the best one x64 bit if you got 8 gb ram like me
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      OK, so to clarify... When a game is running, that requires most of the RAM, Windows will cut back on its use, and give it to the game, right? If this is the case, then I don't mind, and I'll get 64-Bit.

      Games that will be played are things like, GTAIV, Black Ops, (pretty much the whole CoD series) BFBC2, K&L2, Just Cause 2, SC:CC etc etc.

      I can get a OEM copy of Windows 7 Home Basic for £19. Again, this will NOT be used as my main OS, and will only be used for gaming and nothing else. So consider this before suggesting anything that will cost me more like Win 7 Pro etc.

      If I get the green light by tomorrow, I'll be going with Windows 7 Home Basic 64-Bit.
     
     
     
    Reply
    Submit reply
    TSR Support Team

    We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

    Updated: December 20, 2010
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
    Useful resources

    Articles:

    The Student Room tech wikiTech forum guidelines

    Quick link:

    Unanswered technology and computers threads

    Sponsored features:

    Web Legend

    Win a Macbook Air!

    Blog about setting up a website for a chance to win in our Web Legend competition.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.