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    I did a search but didn't find anything. I'm a second year. In my first year I got a 68% average, where one module let me down. This year I've started my revision early but I don't know if I'm being optimal.

    All I'm really doing are past papers, and if I get stuck I look at other problems of a similar nature.

    The thing is, I did this last year and managed to get in the mid 60s or 70s for those papers. Is there any way I can improve my learning technique to get my marks into the higher areas?

    Does anyone have any tips or suggestions that may prove useful?
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    Do all of the optional (i.e. more difficult) questions on problem sheets and the exams should be relatively easy in comparison.
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    This is not relevant to the thread but in response to your sig I've referenced XKCD a couple of times before
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    Any Tips for a first year ?

    and the main differences between A-level revision and undergrad revision ?

    thanks
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    I'd also be interested in how people have needed to adapt their revision from A level to degree level. Would be hugely helpful
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    I didn't adapt my revision at all (but I did advanced higher which is less taught to the exam than a-level).

    Basically lecturers will set up a pattern for a paper over 5 years and then spring something on you that hasn't been in the paper before, cause lecturers love trolling. The only solution is to actually learn the entire course (or take the risk and concentrate on past paper questions). You will be able to tell from the way they respond to questions about exams if they are likely to deviate wildly for the fun of it

    1) "here's how to do the most common questions in the exam" - pay attention to this lecture and learn all of the solutions/ techniques described plus make sure you learn the rest of the course but the stuff worked through here is likely to be crucial
    2) "you are expected to learn everything" - most likely to ask random/obscure material. beneficial to do all tutorials more than once as revision. If you can't learn all the material look at past papers and try and figure out if any info is expendable (for example I had to know 1 of 15 proofs for the exam based on past papers so I learned 0 as I was completely incapable of learning 15, in the end I lost 2 marks out of 50 by not answering the proof question but I did well on the rest of the paper)
    3) "everything you need to know is in your tutorials" - pretty self explanatory do your tutorial sheets! if there are optional questions have a bash at these as they will help you solidify concepts and make the easier questions seem pedestrian.

    In general:
    - know all concepts
    -know the reasons behind a solution (if you blank you will hopefully be able to figure out the right method)
    -if you have a procedure to learn: work out the steps, number them and then condense them down to the one or two bits you have to do that you always forget
    -do all your tutorials at least once with no notes. If you get stuck circle that question, look up the solution and then reattempt it the next day to see if you now know the answer
    -your exam notes should contain definitions, any equations you have to know and any step specific procedures (also anything that you personally struggle to remember) read through this every day you revise and the morning of your exam.
 
 
 
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