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    I've read that after volunteering as an advisor for the CAB for 1yr+ you can potentially get 6 months knocked off your training contract. Does anybody know which firms this actually applies to? Or has this been the case for anybody? I'm trying to weigh up the pros and cons of becoming an advisor.
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    Its absolutely out of the question for commercial city firms. Am not really familiar with the more "normal" type of firm, sorry.
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    (Original post by laura_802)
    I've read that after volunteering as an advisor for the CAB for 1yr+ you can potentially get 6 months knocked off your training contract. Does anybody know which firms this actually applies to? Or has this been the case for anybody? I'm trying to weigh up the pros and cons of becoming an advisor.
    From what I recall, it was just an idea that was being discussed for consideration by the SRA and being a CAB advisor was just one of the examples included. Other examples included doing other law related work, paralegals etc. But you would have to keep a portfolio of work done during your period of work which would then be submitted to an external assessor who would decide if you would be able to reduce the length of your training contract.

    I'm sorry I don't have a link for where I read this. But as jacketpotato said above, the larger firms probably would not consider this option.
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    The rules for this are set out below.

    http://www.sra.org.uk/documents/stud...pplication.pdf


    However, just because the rules allow the time for a training contract to be reduced doesn't mean your employer will let you apply.

    Generally, criminal law firms are well disposed to this. The quicker you are a solicitor, the sooner you will be down the Mags.

    Firms are often better disposed to people whose experience was gained with that firm and to second career people who bring a relevant skill set (e.g. contracts managers, HR people, tax inspectors) and just need the "badge" of being a solicitor as quickly as possible.

    The economic question for firms is will you have enough skills in 18 months to justify being charged out at the rate appropriate to assistant solicitors in order to offset your higher salary? For most non-criminal lawyers aged 23 straight out of university and law school, the answer is "no".
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    (Original post by laura_802)
    I've read that after volunteering as an advisor for the CAB for 1yr+ you can potentially get 6 months knocked off your training contract. Does anybody know which firms this actually applies to? Or has this been the case for anybody? I'm trying to weigh up the pros and cons of becoming an advisor.
    I've been volunteering at the CAB for one year now as an advisor and regardless of whether or not you reduce the length of your training contract, it's worth doing.

    It looks good on your CV, you can get a certificate once you've completed your generalist training and it can even lead to job opportunities. (I secured a job at my branch after 6 months.) Moreover, it will give you valuable experience in interviewing and advising clients and providing telephone advice, which will stand you in good stead when you start advising as a solicitor.

    I had a two week work experience placement at a law firm and one of the trainee solicitors supervising me got me to phone the court on her behalf because she didn't like to use the phone. By volunteering at CAB, you can overcome any of these difficulties or fears prior to securing a training contract. It is a long committment though, I had to volunteer a minimum of 2 days per week (this may vary branch to branch) and I only secured my certificate in September of this year. (I started volunteering last November.)
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    I did this before and during the LPC, and it's well worth it for the knowledge and experience you gain. However, I don't even need to ask to know that my firm wouldn't dream of letting me cut my TC short on this basis.

    I think this is more relevant where you train at a small firm, especially where their specialisms are things like residential property and probate, as these firms often can't really afford trainees for a long time and would prefer you to become an associate as quickly as possible.

    As for large firms, I'm not arrogant enough to assume that I could have picked up much experience relevant to their corporate/banking specialisms and approach to law, let alone enough to warrant 6 months off my TC.
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    (Original post by hmaus)
    :eek: Pretty shocking if a trainee is afraid to use the phone!
    Lol... wow I can't imagine they'd last very long as a qualified solicitor if they don't like using the phone! As a trainee I'd frequently make 20-40 calls a day - it's a big part of the job!!

    Beth (solicitor)
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    I only ever seem to call people to bully them :p:
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    CAB is worth it!!
 
 
 
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