Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

(As levels) Which revision method works best for you? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I know this question has been asked a lot of times, but what is the best way to revise for As levels?! I have quite a few exams in January, and kinda need to get started. I end up working and not actually doing any effective revision! So any ideas/good methods?
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    burning stuff
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    reading thru textbuk, and making notes of stuff you find newww!! :O
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Just going on the internet, looking at the websites which help with specific subjects (economics for example) and just re reading the sections over and over until it's drummed into my head.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Read the textbook is the best. Some people say they don't remember from just reading it but if you read it a few times you remember it all. You will definatly learn most per unit of time by only reading becuase it is the best way of getting as much information into your brain as you can in the time you have. All other techniques are bs because cutting, sticking, colouring, drawing doesn't actually make any information go into your head, whatever weird method you use ultimaltely it is going to end up with you reading the stuff you are learning. So you may as well miss out all of the ineffieciencies and just do the reading.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sternumator)
    Read the textbook is the best. Some people say they don't remember from just reading it but if you read it a few times you remember it all. You will definatly learn most per unit of time by only reading becuase it is the best way of getting as much information into your brain as you can in the time you have. All other techniques are bs because cutting, sticking, colouring, drawing doesn't actually make any information go into your head, whatever weird method you use ultimaltely it is going to end up with you reading the stuff you are learning. So you may as well miss out all of the ineffieciencies and just do the reading.
    lol it REALLY does not work by just reading.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    BEST WAY SERIOUSLY:

    MAKE SYLLABUS NOTES --> LOOK AT SECTIONS OF NOTES ---> READ THOSE NOTES ALOUD SEVERAL TIMES ---> COVER YOUR NOTES ---> WRITE DOWN EVERYTHING YOU REMEMBER ---> REPEAT IF NECESSARY.

    I've done that for all my exams and i've basically learnt everything for bio and chem now
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Also when you are reading aloud your notes try to imagine what is happening for example - make a picture in your head.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I've got flip flile folders and basically went through the spec for my subjects, making a page per topic and making sure it had all the relevant information. Now I can flip through, only reading relevant information, rather than trawling through the textbook, and doing each section and typing it out helped me learn alot
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    this isnt from my alevel but is the way i wish i had revised for them and how i tackle degree content.
    Through out the year make your notes on lined paper and put it in a file.
    About a month before the exam rewrite it into a note pad (one per subject or one per module depending how big your modules are) seperating it out into topics and adding additional notes from textbooks.
    2weeks before the exam condense it down to 1-2pages maximum per subject
    week before read over your condensed notes and do practice questions (as many as you can find)

    This method only works if you commit a significant amount of time to revision, so might not be ideal at alevel
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LifeIsGood)
    lol it REALLY does not work by just reading.
    Of course it does. You have got to think about what you are actually reading and try to remember it. For AS all I did was read the book, it took me about a night to read the content of a whole module so I just did that each night for about a week and by the end I could resight anything out of any of my text books. Reading doesn't make it stick the first time completely but once you read it a second and third time it will. It is a boring method but it is the most effective use of time.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by LifeIsGood)
    lol it REALLY does not work by just reading.
    Just reading through the revision guides a few times worked perfectly well for me...so it really can work

    But yeah, reading through revision guide over and over until you learn it works well. Make notes on anything you find really really hard. Worked for me anyway
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    reading is a very good way actually. in the same way you read a book and remember things about it. if you are truly interested in your subjects then according to rules of psychology like active processing and attention given to stimulus making it enter the ltm, reading your textbook over and over again can be effective for some people when they just cant be asked to write or make notes. of course it doesn't work for everyone but what method does?
    • TSR Support Team
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    well i think you should buy a new book, then write down the past paper questions, highlight the questions, then during the last couple of months, it will sink in very nicely. i guess looking at the textbook is good but trust me, this method is really good, and it helps you ensure your answers are in line with what the mark scheme says, particularly in biology:rolleyes:
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I'm also one of those people who can memorise things easily just by reading over them a few times. However practice questions and past papers really do help with subjects like the sciences and maths. I also like to teach an imaginary class, or make connections between things (really helps with understanding). To be honest I think the only way I've managed to get A*'s is by natural gifts such as English - I used to write a lot of stories when I was younger so now english is a breeze I'm also a critical thinker which helps for alternative explanations and counter-arguments. R.E - I've been going to church since I was young so it helps a little, only a LITTLE. Then for other subjects my very good memory plays a great part. I've pretty much just flown by with memorisation, which I hate so I'm trying to focus on understanding more now since I think that's more valuable for exams.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.