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    Hi guys, first of all I would just like to point out this this my first post so I do apologise if this is posted in the wrong section and I do realise you must get asked the same questions over and over again.

    With that out of the way, I have a number of unanswered questions even after looking through this forum for a few hours now. I'm a mature student who lost his job due to the recession and decided to return to education due to being scared stiff of ending up in a dead end job for the rest of my life. After messing up my standard grades due to not giving a damn in my early years I as lucky enough to land a place at college. I'm studying four highers; English,History,Politics and Modern Studies. I'm expected to receive the following; AABB.

    I will be applying to Stirling, Napier, Aberdeen and Dundee. I really would like to know what the realistic chances of gaining entry into these establishments are. I must be honest without wishing to offend, however, Napier is my last choice and I'm find myself wondering if I was to end up at Napier what my chances of landing a decent job at the end of my degree is?

    I also find myself asking just how demanding the degree is. I love a challenge and do not shrink away from a hard graft. Although a social life is very important to me too. Obviously in the run up and including exam times the social life comes second my question is just how demanding is the course. Do you guys still have a lie during your studies?

    Finally I must ask what you guys plan to go on to do after the degree, what are the main options people go on to do? And roughly what is the starting salary of a trainee?

    Sorry for the long first post but if you could shine some light into this for me I would be extremely grateful!

    Craig
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    Are you undertaking a degree in Scots Law or English Law?

    That would influence the starting salary significantly; in a commercial firm in london they can reach upwards of £40,000, the average being closer to £36,000 there.

    In a regional firm, £25,000 is probably more realistic. In Scotland it is likely to be closer to this, perhaps slightly lower.

    And out of curiosity, what is "Modern Studies"? I've not heard of it before :confused:
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Are you undertaking a degree in Scots Law or English Law?

    That would influence the starting salary significantly; in a commercial firm in london they can reach upwards of £40,000, the average being closer to £36,000 there.

    In a regional firm, £25,000 is probably more realistic. In Scotland it is likely to be closer to this, perhaps slightly lower.

    And out of curiosity, what is "Modern Studies"? I've not heard of it before :confused:
    Sorry for not making that clear, its Scots Law. Wiki describes Modern Studies as;

    "Modern Studies is a subject unique to the Scottish secondary school curriculum , that is concerned with the study of local, national and international issues from a social, political and economic perspective."
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    (Original post by Edinburgh lad)
    Hi guys, first of all I would just like to point out this this my first post so I do apologise if this is posted in the wrong section and I do realise you must get asked the same questions over and over again.

    With that out of the way, I have a number of unanswered questions even after looking through this forum for a few hours now. I'm a mature student who lost his job due to the recession and decided to return to education due to being scared stiff of ending up in a dead end job for the rest of my life. After messing up my standard grades due to not giving a damn in my early years I as lucky enough to land a place at college. I'm studying four highers; English,History,Politics and Modern Studies. I'm expected to receive the following; AABB.

    I will be applying to Stirling, Napier, Aberdeen and Dundee. I really would like to know what the realistic chances of gaining entry into these establishments are. I must be honest without wishing to offend, however, Napier is my last choice and I'm find myself wondering if I was to end up at Napier what my chances of landing a decent job at the end of my degree is?

    I also find myself asking just how demanding the degree is. I love a challenge and do not shrink away from a hard graft. Although a social life is very important to me too. Obviously in the run up and including exam times the social life comes second my question is just how demanding is the course. Do you guys still have a lie during your studies?

    Finally I must ask what you guys plan to go on to do after the degree, what are the main options people go on to do? And roughly what is the starting salary of a trainee?

    Sorry for the long first post but if you could shine some light into this for me I would be extremely grateful!

    Craig
    Dundee has a duel qualifying degree in english and scots law...which maybe of interest to you. But if you plan on just staying in scotland, its probably a waste.

    As far as starting salary as a trainee...I wouldn't worry too much about it. Once you become a qualified solicitor, that number goes up quite a bit. You'll only be making a trainee salary for 2 years.
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    Ah, that explains why I haven't came across it before then if it is unique to Scotland.

    Well, unless you want to do a conversion course post-graduation you're limited to practicing Scots law, so most of the big firms are out of the window if they're what you're aiming at. They do, however, take applicants who wish to undertake the one year conversion course (the GDL) and many pay the full fees along with a substantial grant for living costs, if that is something you are interested in.

    Salaries in these firms typically start at £35,000-£42,000 for trainees, £60,000-£95,000 for newly qualified associates and in the largest firms can reach over £1,000,000 at equity partner level.

    Smaller regional firms in England offer salaries of around £20,000 - £30,000 for trainees, £40,000 - £55,000 for newly qualified associates and generally £100,000 - £250,000 at partner level.

    If there are any particular firms you have in mind, it's a good idea to check out their graduate recruitment sites, as they often say what their minimum requirements are (for example, some London firms require a minimum of AAB or equivalent) and their starting salaries.

    The legal gossip site RollOnFriday has a lot of handy information about firms with offices in the UK, including information on pay, hours, bonuses, and even the bathrooms and biscuits.

    http://www.rollonfriday.co.uk/Inside...8/Default.aspx

    I hope this is somewhat useful, I'm afraid I don't know a great deal about Scottish firms!
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Ah, that explains why I haven't came across it before then if it is unique to Scotland.

    Well, unless you want to do a conversion course post-graduation you're limited to practicing Scots law, so most of the big firms are out of the window if they're what you're aiming at. They do, however, take applicants who wish to undertake the one year conversion course (the GDL) and many pay the full fees along with a substantial grant for living costs, if that is something you are interested in.

    Salaries in these firms typically start at £35,000-£42,000 for trainees, £60,000-£95,000 for newly qualified associates and in the largest firms can reach over £1,000,000 at equity partner level.

    Smaller regional firms in England offer salaries of around £20,000 - £30,000 for trainees, £40,000 - £55,000 for newly qualified associates and generally £100,000 - £250,000 at partner level.

    If there are any particular firms you have in mind, it's a good idea to check out their graduate recruitment sites, as they often say what their minimum requirements are (for example, some London firms require a minimum of AAB or equivalent) and their starting salaries.

    The legal gossip site RollOnFriday has a lot of handy information about firms with offices in the UK, including information on pay, hours, bonuses, and even the bathrooms and biscuits.

    http://www.rollonfriday.co.uk/Inside...8/Default.aspx

    I hope this is somewhat useful, I'm afraid I don't know a great deal about Scottish firms!
    The GDL would of course be of interest as it is obviously a valuable asset. I'm open to travel and working all over the uk.

    What are your views on the reputation of the University and how it effects your chances of gaining a decent job at the end of your degree? As im all for the uni experience, however what it comes down to in the end for me is the career afterwards.
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    The GDL would obviously be of interest at a later stage. What are your views on the reputation effecting the job offers i receive after my degree?
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    (Original post by Edinburgh lad)
    The GDL would obviously be of interest at a later stage. What are your views on the reputation effecting the job offers i receive after my degree?
    The legal profession has a reputation for being quite elitist, and if you look at the partnership of big firms they are very Oxbridge heavy, though a lot of firms now say that they care more about the potential that an applicant has rather than the place that they have studied. I have heard of some Clifford Chance (one of the top five firms with a billion pound revenue) trainees coming from the University of Westminster (a quite lowly ranked institution), so perhaps they really mean what they say. I believe Slaughter and May (widely regarded as the most discerning firm in the UK) has trainees from over 65 universities currently.

    I assume you know that you would be applying for training contracts whilst still completing your degree; in England you would apply during your second year or if you were going to go down the GDL route you'd apply in your final year, I believe.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Ah, that explains why I haven't came across it before then if it is unique to Scotland.

    Well, unless you want to do a conversion course post-graduation you're limited to practicing Scots law, so most of the big firms are out of the window if they're what you're aiming at. They do, however, take applicants who wish to undertake the one year conversion course (the GDL) and many pay the full fees along with a substantial grant for living costs, if that is something you are interested in.

    Salaries in these firms typically start at £35,000-£42,000 for trainees, £60,000-£95,000 for newly qualified associates and in the largest firms can reach over £1,000,000 at equity partner level.

    Smaller regional firms in England offer salaries of around £20,000 - £30,000 for trainees, £40,000 - £55,000 for newly qualified associates and generally £100,000 - £250,000 at partner level.

    If there are any particular firms you have in mind, it's a good idea to check out their graduate recruitment sites, as they often say what their minimum requirements are (for example, some London firms require a minimum of AAB or equivalent) and their starting salaries.

    The legal gossip site RollOnFriday has a lot of handy information about firms with offices in the UK, including information on pay, hours, bonuses, and even the bathrooms and biscuits.

    http://www.rollonfriday.co.uk/Inside...8/Default.aspx

    I hope this is somewhat useful, I'm afraid I don't know a great deal about Scottish firms!


    Out of interest which regional firms pay £55k at NQ level? I know Wiggin LLP pays out around £50k at NQ but didn't know there were others. Most seem to be around the £36-40k mark. Thanks.
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    As a trainee you can expect to get around 30k at commercial regional firms. Less at more high-street type firms.

    Its worth bearing in mind that the "effective" salary of a trainee is higher - the firm invests a lot of time and effort into training you and will probably pay something like 10k fees for your LPC plus a maintainance grant for that year

    You know you don't have to do a law degree if you are already a grad, right? Its worth looking into the GDL before you commit, though might be difficult to secure a TC before starting it
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)

    You know you don't have to do a law degree if you are already a grad, right? Its worth looking into the GDL before you commit, though might be difficult to secure a TC before starting it
    The OP is doing highers, which are the Scottish equivalent of A levels. In any case, there's no GDL option north of the border. On the other hand, a person with a Scottish law degree could apply to do the GDL to qualify in England.

    Aspiringlawstudent, while it's true that Slaughter trainees comprise graduates from 65 universities, half of their trainees are Oxbridge-educated.
 
 
 
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