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    at the moment im reading the core textbooks, but im finding it really hard to do further reading, i know it sounds dumb but like how do i do it?
    all i end up doing is just re writing the textbook, how do i write efficient additional notes, do i have to read everything in the book or only whats on my lecture outlines thats in the book?

    thanks guys
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    There's two issues here.

    First, don't take notes simply based on the textbooks. Figure out what the major topics/questions are, and take notes on those, preferably using multiple textbooks. Then build up your notes with articles. Figure out what the areas of controversy/uncertainty are, and where people think reform is necessary. Then read different articles, and decide what your own view on them is. Limit yourself to a sentence or two for articles, and bullet points for texts. Try to get the crucial points, but you shouldn't just be summarising the text in excruciating detail. Figure out what the principles the text discusses are, and where the text is offering commentary. Differentiate between the two. You should always be thinking critically about the law, although this can take getting used to and isn't easy.

    Second, I'd focus primarily on your lecture outlines (and tutorial guides, if you have them). The textbook isn't usually going to be designed for your course, specifically. Also, by this time you ought to be looking at the syllabus/exam criteria. Think about what the exam covers, and make sure you get to grips with that first before going into more depth about other areas that interest you, but aren't directly useful for the exam. Wider reading/further reading is useful for getting stronger marks, but you really need a sound grasp of the basics first.
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    (Original post by sharan7)


    hi reading text book will rally help a lot in da exam
    bt focus mor on ur subject gide.. do u hav ne? coz in sjubect gude u wil get da same topic. and more clearly to da pnt.. dats wat we' askd 2 do
    ofcourse ur lecture notes ..den u van make u own notes and study.. hop it helps
    I quite literally have no idea what this means.
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    are you dyslex sharan?
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    (Original post by trimmy)
    at the moment im reading the core textbooks, but im finding it really hard to do further reading, i know it sounds dumb but like how do i do it?
    all i end up doing is just re writing the textbook, how do i write efficient additional notes, do i have to read everything in the book or only whats on my lecture outlines thats in the book?

    thanks guys
    Okay, this is how my note taking tends to happen:

    1. Read over the subject from a concise (perhaps even verging on basic textbook). This is sometimes skipped in favour of a more in depth book but I've found that for more difficult modules, it's better for me to start off with a "Directions" type book until I get to grips with the key issues. At this point, I just read. No notes.

    2. Reread same material, this time making note of key points and cases. At this point I'm only looking for the basic points of law, the key issues that are central to the topic.

    3. Use a couple of other, more complex textbooks to add detailed notes. This could be expansion on the evolution of the key points (WHY is the law the way it is now?), controversies in the area, anything that is a finer point and beyond the basic law.

    4. Read through the cases and expand on them in my notes. In my first year, my knowledge of most cases was from tiny summaries within textbooks (nutshells style of learning) and found that come exams I just didn't have much to say beyond the key points of law. Everything became much clearer when I began to read the full cases and judgements. (Again, it will help you to understand why the law is as it is).

    5. Find a couple of journals on the issue. We're quite often directed to relevant material for seminar preparation.

    6. Chase up information on anything I want to/should know more about. Whether that be through footnotes, cases, journals, referring back to a simpler textbook, I've had to learn to not just leave certain areas as nothing but basic notes because I'm finding it difficult.
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    I am not at university yet, but I have read a book called 'Letters to a Law Student' which actually tackle the issues which you are talking about. It might be worth a read.
 
 
 
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