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    I'm really interested in economics though my mid-term result didn't seem good...(just 75%..).Currently we're using Grant's book and i don't like it, i found Mankiw's Principles of ecnomics better. I guess it's just the problem of answering skills and i shoudn't worry about my grades and i believe i'll still get an A at AS Economics. Can anyone give me advice??

    Anyway, i'm thinking about reading some books and i'd like to learn ecnomics systematically, perhaps other uni textbooks would be better for me to have a deeper insight about ecnomics rather than those pop books. I've read freakonomics/the economic naturalist/the undercover ecnomomics etc. And to be honest, i didn't learn much from them...

    my reading list involves Mankiw's,Samuelson's Ecnomics and Stiglizt's as well. I was told that these three elementary ecnomics textbook were good and quite easy for us to understand.

    SO should i stick to reading pop books or just start self-learning/reading uni textbooks? And will admission officers like seeing you mention about reading these books in advance in PS or they just like you to read pop books?

    PS.I'm looking forward to going to LSE and i'm international

    MANY THANKS!!!!
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    Anyone to give me advice???
    Having ecomonics exam tomorrow but dont have the mood to revise...
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    Text books are better, but you have to be realistic with them, they are designed to be studied not read in the same way you would a pop book. If you are still in A level don't expect to try and work your way through a full textbook, focus on learning and understanding some 1st year topics, eg in Micro focus on consumer theory and utility (A level tends to focus on producer theory), get to grips with preferences and so on. Then look at different market structures in producer theory, monopoly, oligopoly etc. In Macro focus on things like how the goods and money markets work maybe leading up to the ISLM model, that would be a good starter for you.

    One thing to watch for which is annoying about A levels is their mark scheme is very strict about mentioning the things they want you to mention from your own syllabus, if they ask a question about unemployment and you start talking about equilibrium in the labour market and the Phillips curve, sacrifice ratio and disinflation, because you have read this stuff yourself, you are likely not to get many marks for it if that's not what the A level syllabus was looking for. So it doesn't pay in A level exams to have extra knowledge. The knowledge is useful just remember when you are examined, stick to the basic stuff you did on A level.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Text books are better, but you have to be realistic with them, they are designed to be studied not read in the same way you would a pop book. If you are still in A level don't expect to try and work your way through a full textbook, focus on learning and understanding some 1st year topics, eg in Micro focus on consumer theory and utility (A level tends to focus on producer theory), get to grips with preferences and so on. Then look at different market structures in producer theory, monopoly, oligopoly etc. In Macro focus on things like how the goods and money markets work maybe leading up to the ISLM model, that would be a good starter for you.

    One thing to watch for which is annoying about A levels is their mark scheme is very strict about mentioning the things they want you to mention from your own syllabus, if they ask a question about unemployment and you start talking about equilibrium in the labour market and the Phillips curve, sacrifice ratio and disinflation, because you have read this stuff yourself, you are likely not to get many marks for it if that's not what the A level syllabus was looking for. So it doesn't pay in A level exams to have extra knowledge. The knowledge is useful just remember when you are examined, stick to the basic stuff you did on A level.
    Quite inspiring:-)
    so i'll do what the syllabus requires but read more when i'm free. It's just so many people are mentioning these pop books in PS and i would be bored after reading the 100th 'i read freakonomics' if im the officer. Also i found don't quite understand what economics news are talking about a bit frustrating and how can you talk about economics and your love of it in PS when you actually know so little.
    Anyway thanks again and seems ur quite 'an early bird' :-)
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    (Original post by a61a)
    Quite inspiring:-)
    so i'll do what the syllabus requires but read more when i'm free. It's just so many people are mentioning these pop books in PS and i would be bored after reading the 100th 'i read freakonomics' if im the officer. Also i found don't quite understand what economics news are talking about a bit frustrating and how can you talk about economics and your love of it in PS when you actually know so little.
    Anyway thanks again and seems ur quite 'an early bird' :-)
    Exactly. Everybody says they have read the same pop books.

    As 'pop' style reading I would recommend reading online blogs eg Krugman's NY times blog. The articles are short and they refer to some current issue in economics. Also the economics articles in broadsheet newspapers are good because you usually don't need more than A level to get the gist of it. If you have a Macro textbook as reference, then when there are parts you don't understand, you can look them up, I learned a lot through doing that type of stuff then when I came to study it at uni I was ahead of myself on some of the material.
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    (Original post by a61a)
    Quite inspiring:-)
    so i'll do what the syllabus requires but read more when i'm free. It's just so many people are mentioning these pop books in PS and i would be bored after reading the 100th 'i read freakonomics' if im the officer. Also i found don't quite understand what economics news are talking about a bit frustrating and how can you talk about economics and your love of it in PS when you actually know so little.
    Anyway thanks again and seems ur quite 'an early bird' :-)
    Unless you've done some Macro you probably wont know what they're talking about, there's very rarely micro news. If it's personal statements you're looking to enhance find a book that truly interests you, I talked about Hernando de Soto's Mystery of Capitalism because of his work with development economics, which at the time time greatly interested me. These books are unlikely to be of any use to you for your exams though.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Exactly. Everybody says they have read the same pop books.

    As 'pop' style reading I would recommend reading online blogs eg Krugman's NY times blog. The articles are short and they refer to some current issue in economics. Also the economics articles in broadsheet newspapers are good because you usually don't need more than A level to get the gist of it. If you have a Macro textbook as reference, then when there are parts you don't understand, you can look them up, I learned a lot through doing that type of stuff then when I came to study it at uni I was ahead of myself on some of the material.
    Yeah...saw you mentioned of similar things at other threads,really useful info to me. It's quite grateful to you for giving such suggestions. And how to talk about an economic idea specifically in your PS? Just pick one idea that you find interesting and read more then express your personal view? Economics seems to be all about reading and learning at my level
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Unless you've done some Macro you probably wont know what they're talking about, there's very rarely micro news. If it's personal statements you're looking to enhance find a book that truly interests you, I talked about Hernando de Soto's Mystery of Capitalism because of his work with development economics, which at the time time greatly interested me. These books are unlikely to be of any use to you for your exams though.
    Agree with you. Pop books did sparked my interest and i want to go deeper in economics after these books. One thing for sure is that i'll stick with a level, and read some good text books and some pop books for fun and new thoughts. But perhaps my PS would still focus on the more professional but boring one, pop books would be a gate to the economic road (and worth mentioning?)
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    (Original post by a61a)
    Agree with you. Pop books did sparked my interest and i want to go deeper in economics after these books. One thing for sure is that i'll stick with a level, and read some good text books and some pop books for fun and new thoughts. But perhaps my PS would still focus on the more professional but boring one, pop books would be a gate to the economic road (and worth mentioning?)
    There's nothing wrong with having a pop book just don't make it the one every other Econ student uses or one that's very light on economics. More importantly you need to present a good view of the book and how it relates to you and your course.
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    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    There's nothing wrong with having a pop book just don't make it the one every other Econ student uses or one that's very light on economics. More importantly you need to present a good view of the book and how it relates to you and your course.
    Pop books are pretty good as well, just feel finding the proper one within these books takes more time and having some rather different to read can prove your interest further more though it's still about reading. Maybe i still haven't read enough to find the one that really fascinates me. And i still believe a good text book can lay one's foundation in a more systematic way, and is helpful to people like me who really want to know why and its effects etc.
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    75% is hardly bad at university.
 
 
 
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