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Could we sue Nick Clegg for breach of contract? Watch

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    This was something that came up from a disscusion I had with some friends of mine a few days ago.

    Nick Clegg signed a plege saying he and his party would not raise tuition fees, he broke that plege. So could we therefore sue him for break a contract? Because the way I see it he signed a contract with us and went back on it. I was thinking we could ask him to pay us the same ammount he's trying to rob us of it would only be fair.
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    I'm not sure it works like that...
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    If this was possible, every politician going back to Winston Churchill would be paying us back for broken promises. Liebour and CONservatives would be bankrupt. Our taxes would go up tenfold as that's the money they'ed be paying us back with. Obviously.

    A nice, but silly idea all in all
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    (Original post by Dude Where's My Username)
    If this was possible, every politician going back to Winston Churchill would be paying us back for broken promises. Liebour and CONservatives would be bankrupt. Our taxes would go up tenfold as that's the money they'ed be paying us back with. Obviously.

    A nice, but silly idea all in all
    Once upon a time, getting away with rape was as easy as breathing. I don't think that broken promises in the past can justify past wrongs.

    Also, the idea here is to sue Clegg, not the government. I'm sure the OP was thinking of taking the money out of his own pocket.
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    He didn't sign a legally binding contract, so no.
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    I'm pretty sure the promises he and his party made were based on the unlikely event of the Lib Dems actually winning the election, they didn't win the election or even come 2nd I'm afraid

    They're a JUNIOR party in a coalition government. These tuition fees proposals and other plans on cuts where in the Conservative Party manifesto and more people voted for that than for Labour or the Lib Dems. This is why the whole protest is a farce and the public at large doesn't support it
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    An election manifesto is not a legally binding contract. A contract is only created if both sides intend to create a legally binding agreement and sign to that effect. Nick Clegg may have signed a manifesto but that is only half of the contract-the offer. Since there was no written acceptance of that offer from any particular group of people, it is not a legally binding contract. Apart from that I am sure he covered himself in small print on the manifesto saying that his promises were subject to future consideration or something. Additionally even if we were to say that by voting him into government we were accepting his offer, remember that he is in coalition government and the Conservatives have a greater majority than Lib Dems so that would be taken into account. Any legal action would be a waste of time and money.
    However there is a doctrine of manifesto and mandate which means that a political party presents a pre-election manifesto outlining their plans for their term in office and the public votes based on that. It is their manifesto which gives them a mandate to govern us since it is the public's right to choose who governs them and what measures they take. It is throught his doctrine that this is enacted. So if the Lib Dems had promised something in their manifesto and once in government didnt keep to it they would no longer have the mandate to govern and potentially and theoretically an election could be called. However since they are in a coalition government they cannot possibly fulfill their manifesto while allowing the conservatives to fulfill theirs because they overlap and contradict in many ways.
    The bottom line is that there is nothing that can be done about it so u may as well get back 2 work, take out a great big student loan and spend the rest of ur life paying it back or quit studying and earn some cash. Either way the decisions have been made and no amount of protesting and violent, childish disorder and destruction will change that.
    I am not 100% sure of the accuracy of the info provided, please correct me if Im wrong. Im only an A Level student.
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    (Original post by StakedSalmon)
    Once upon a time, getting away with rape was as easy as breathing. I don't think that broken promises in the past can justify past wrongs.

    Also, the idea here is to sue Clegg, not the government. I'm sure the OP was thinking of taking the money out of his own pocket.
    That doesn't make the idea any less stupid I'm afraid. Also I'm not sure what you're getting at with the first paragraph :confused:

    A political mandate IS NOT legally binding or a genuine contract, hence why politicians very nearly always do the opposite of what they may have promised during an election rally. Nick Cleggs "contract" was a prop. Nothing more.
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    (Original post by Dude Where's My Username)
    That doesn't make the idea any less stupid I'm afraid. Also I'm not sure what you're getting at with the first paragraph :confused:

    A political mandate IS NOT legally binding or a genuine contract, hence why politicians very nearly always do the opposite of what they may have promised during an election rally. Nick Cleggs "contract" was a prop. Nothing more.
    I know it's not legally binding. What I was getting at with my first sentence is that rape was once legal, too. I don't see any reason to maintain the status quo; I, and literally almost everybody else in this country, would probably be happy to see laws passed that illegitimize making false promises, especially when they're planned in advance (as revealed by leaked conversations).

    As for the thing about being less stupid... I never claimed anything as much. I was just pointing out that you'd misinterpreted the OP.
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    Have a look into unilateral contracts. The acceptance of the offer is constituted in the act of starting providing your side of the consideration (in this example, voting for the Lib Dems).

    The reason that it would fall down, is in the lack of the intention to form a legally binding contract - that is that Clegg didn't have that intention when he made the offer. That and the fact that the Lib Dems did not get a majority.
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    Nick Clegg said he'd remove tuition fees if the lib dems won the election. They didn't. I don't see why everyone struggles so much with this concept...
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    No. It's that simple.
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    It was but an invitation to treat, or?
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    Something irrelevant to the discussion:

    Something relevant to the discussion: that pledge was not legally binding. If politicians' words were legally binding then every politician ever would have been sued by now.
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    (Original post by TryMe)
    This was something that came up from a disscusion I had with some friends of mine a few days ago.

    Nick Clegg signed a plege saying he and his party would not raise tuition fees, he broke that plege. So could we therefore sue him for break a contract? Because the way I see it he signed a contract with us and went back on it. I was thinking we could ask him to pay us the same ammount he's trying to rob us of it would only be fair.
    No, because a manifesto is not legally binding until the policies contained in the manifesto become law.
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    There is also the rule of assumption when it comes to intention to create legal relations. A sweeping statement is not seen as something where someone intends to make legal relations. If he had said however, I want this to be a binding contract in his speech, some weirdo somewhere might have a case. But no, don't be so ridiculous.
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    (Original post by TryMe)
    This was something that came up from a disscusion I had with some friends of mine a few days ago.

    Nick Clegg signed a plege saying he and his party would not raise tuition fees, he broke that plege. So could we therefore sue him for break a contract? Because the way I see it he signed a contract with us and went back on it. I was thinking we could ask him to pay us the same ammount he's trying to rob us of it would only be fair.
    Its not legally binding
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    (Original post by fredscarecrow)
    Nick Clegg said he'd remove tuition fees if the lib dems won the election. They didn't. I don't see why everyone struggles so much with this concept...
    Actually, he said he would vote against any increase in fees. He didn't. That's why people are angry. BUT he did also promise to press for a better alternative. If he genuinely couldn't think of a better alternative (and he's plainly stated that he believes that the graduate tax that the NUS proposes is worse than the rise. I don't thinks he's in the wrong as much as is made out.
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    Eactly a professor is suing Nick Clegg, i've heard over in LBC some days ago.
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    Can someone just assasinate clegg and cameron already??
 
 
 
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