Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

HELP! additional reading! stuck! please answer. Watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    ive been making good notes from two textbooks, the recommended ones and an extra one is this enough or should i be using like 4 textbooks.
    i was thinking 2 textbooks and journal research as well as articles is enough?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Lectures and one good text book should start to give you a broad overview and understanding of a subject. After that, in preparation for seminars, which should be expanding that basic understanding, I start to follow up footnotes in the basic text. This leads to further reading, other academic opinions, eventually heading towards evaluation and analysis on my part, as opposed to mere description.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cliffg)
    Lectures and one good text book should start to give you a broad overview and understanding of a subject. After that, in preparation for seminars, which should be expanding that basic understanding, I start to follow up footnotes in the basic text. This leads to further reading, other academic opinions, eventually heading towards evaluation and analysis on my part, as opposed to mere description.
    Is this enough to get a first if done properly though?

    thanks
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Generally yes. Once an area of law has been explained to you well in two different ways there are diminishing returns to having it explained again, and you are then in a position to use journal articles/cases/exam practice effectively.

    Sometimes though a particular textbook can be extremely good on a particular point where most other textbooks are inadequate. This might be mentioned in lectures but is worth bearing in mind if you are very confused about a particular piece of law.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Generally yes. Once an area of law has been explained to you well in two different ways there are diminishing returns to having it explained again, and you are then in a position to use journal articles/cases/exam practice effectively.

    Sometimes though a particular textbook can be extremely good on a particular point where most other textbooks are inadequate. This might be mentioned in lectures but is worth bearing in mind if you are very confused about a particular piece of law.
    ahh thanks i've been reading through your previous postings on this matter, your really helpful. one more question how do i make these notes at the moment im just copying out of the textbook i know this is wrong, any tips?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Generally yes. Once an area of law has been explained to you well in two different ways there are diminishing returns to having it explained again, and you are then in a position to use journal articles/cases/exam practice effectively.

    Sometimes though a particular textbook can be extremely good on a particular point where most other textbooks are inadequate. This might be mentioned in lectures but is worth bearing in mind if you are very confused about a particular piece of law.
    Economics.

    Nice term usage BTW.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trimmy)
    ahh thanks i've been reading through your previous postings on this matter, your really helpful. one more question how do i make these notes at the moment im just copying out of the textbook i know this is wrong, any tips?
    This suggests to me that you don't understand the topic before you take notes. Each to their own but personally I think you shouldn't write a word until you understand the topic. Suggest you read two different textbooks, understand how the topic fits together and then produce your own notes in a really really structured way taking material from the different textbooks. You should have a very clear structure and can add detail from lectures, journal articles etc. later if appropriate
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    This suggests to me that you don't understand the topic before you take notes. Each to their own but personally I think you shouldn't write a word until you understand the topic. Suggest you read two different textbooks, understand how the topic fits together and then produce your own notes in a really really structured way taking material from the different textbooks. You should have a very clear structure and can add detail from lectures, journal articles etc. later if appropriate
    So if i was to go through my lecture outlines, which i do to understand the topic they are pretty basic. then read through my two textbooks and then make structured notes. Ahh ok thanks for the help!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tehforum)
    Economics.

    Nice term usage BTW.
    Econolaw ftw!

    (Original post by trimmy)
    So if i was to go through my lecture outlines, which i do to understand the topic they are pretty basic. then read through my two textbooks and then make structured notes. Ahh ok thanks for the help!
    to be honest if you think that the lecture notes already provide you with a decent structure that you can easily apply to problem questions, then you might as well just use that for your structure and add in bits and bobs as you go

    the structure really is key for these things, having a very sensible very clear structure makes it SO much easier to revise and makes your exam answers SO much better
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Econolaw ftw!



    to be honest if you think that the lecture notes already provide you with a decent structure that you can easily apply to problem questions, then you might as well just use that for your structure and add in bits and bobs as you go

    the structure really is key for these things, having a very sensible very clear structure makes it SO much easier to revise and makes your exam answers SO much better
    i know this question is going to come of as really dumb and stupid, and it's most likely a waste of your time, but is everything i need to know on lecture guides, like all i have to do is further reading, on those areas etc, so i don't need to read and make notes on random contract law textbook that i have got out of the library sections etc
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trimmy)
    ive been making good notes from two textbooks, the recommended ones and an extra one is this enough or should i be using like 4 textbooks.
    i was thinking 2 textbooks and journal research as well as articles is enough?
    I think the advice you've been given is good, general advice. However I saw that you asked if you were doing enough to get a first by using lecture notes and one textbook.

    I have to say I'm pretty certain that that's nowhere near enough to get a first. The number of people getting a first in law is extremely low. I know a couple of people however who are cruising towards one at one of the top universities and they do all of the core reading each week, plus a lot of extended reading and complete essays months in advance.

    So basically do what has already been advised and as long as you're relatively intelligent you will stand a chance of getting a good 2:1. However if you want to get a first then you probably need to be doing near 400 pages of reading per seminar and making notes on it.

    In terms of notes: it depends on your memory. I tend to just copy out the textbook a bit more concisely (for a related discipline which isn't law). However this depends on the ability to remember vast amounts of information i.e. in terms of notes for each module each week I probably have around 30-40 pages of A4 typed up. I don't really have limits on the amount I can remember though. However assuming you want to get a first as you've already mentioned it then you would most likely have to have similar amounts of notes for each week.

    Also my notes are an unstructured mess with random doodles all over the place and jokes I remembered while bored in the middle of lectures/ seminars.

    You don't need notes with a decent, clear structure in order to get a first. It depends a lot on how you remember things. I can just remember pages and pages of text.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trimmy)
    i know this question is going to come of as really dumb and stupid, and it's most likely a waste of your time, but is everything i need to know on lecture guides, like all i have to do is further reading, on those areas etc, so i don't need to read and make notes on random contract law textbook that i have got out of the library sections etc
    There's absolutely no way that everything you need will be on the lecture handouts. They are usually quite skeleton, won't give sufficient detail for you to really understand something, and will be of very variable quality. There's no way you can escape using textbooks extensively, sorry.

    If you were going to go off one source, I'd definitely go off a decent textbook rather than a lecture handout. Though using just one textbook is a very risky game (depending on how good the textbook is and how good at law you are).
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by invictus_veritas)
    You don't need notes with a decent, clear structure in order to get a first. It depends a lot on how you remember things. I can just remember pages and pages of text.
    Interesting. Our of interest, do you still manage to answer exam questions in a clear structured way or do you sometimes fall foul to "write everything you know about the general area" syndrome? If so you are very talented.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Interesting. Our of interest, do you still manage to answer exam questions in a clear structured way or do you sometimes fall foul to "write everything you know about the general area" syndrome? If so you are very talented.
    nah answer them fine and can get a first fairly consistently (although it's by no means guaranteed). I got full marks in a lot of my A level papers that were essay exams but ironically enough did not get full marks in a single A level maths paper in which it is supposed to be easier to get full marks.

    Not very talented just a good memory and SHOCKING amounts of practice exam papers i.e. it's not unknown for me to do every single past exam question I can find. I aim to go into exams able to answer all questions equally well and do the first question I see rather than waste time choosing which are the most suitable.

    I have tutored IB and A level students and I do notice that they are unable to work out which pieces of information they have are appropriate for answering examination questions. This problem just confuses me as I can't empathise with it though. I really don't get how people go about writing everything they know about the topic... every single paragraph I write relates directly to the exam question. A good idea is to make sure your first and last question of every paragraph actually responds directly to the exam question.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Will you be richer or poorer than your parents?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.