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    A friend of mine just texted me, for reasons unknown, inquiring as to what an idiomatic French expression for, and I quote, "the rejoinders you could have said at the time but didn't think to say during an argument"would look like. Now I have no idea, as there's not even an expression for that in English, but, Francophones of TSR, I trust you to translate =)
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    Rejoinders? :confused: That makes no sense to me even in English!
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    What Marilyn said. I'd translate if I knew what it meant...
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    I think he means witty responses to a comment or slight.
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    Oh. L'esprit de l'escalier? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%27esprit_de_l%27escalier

    I don't think we have a particular word for that. We just describe the feelings like in English... Les répliques/réparties qu'on aurait pu dire mais auxquelles on ne pensait pas au bon moment.
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    'les répliques on aurait pu dire mais n'en pensait pas lorsqu'on s'est disputé? Although I doubt that's idiomatic or even correct, I figured I'd give it a go before Xurvi gives you the right answer

    Edit: Damnit already too late!
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    (Original post by xmarilynx)
    'les répliques on aurait pu dire mais n'en pensait pas lorsqu'on s'est disputé? Although I doubt that's idiomatic or even correct, I figured I'd give it a go before Xurvi gives you the right answer

    Edit: Damnit already too late!
    :awesome:

    Don't forget the pronoms relatifs :p:
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    :awesome:

    Don't forget the pronoms relatifs :p:
    I haven't forgotten them, I just (still) don't understand them! :sad:
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    (Original post by xmarilynx)
    I haven't forgotten them, I just (still) don't understand them! :sad:
    Que introduces a new clause that give more information much like some kind of complex adjective
    Qui replaces the subject (and consequently is followed by a verb)
    au/à la/aux ~quel(le)(s) is used when you want to reverse the subject and indirect complement in a sentence: je pense à un film - le film auquel je pense. Le/la/les quel(le)(s) are pronouns that are pretty much like which (choice between few possibilities)

    les répliques qu(e)' on aurait pu dire mais auxquelles on ne pensait pas lorsqu'on s'est disputé

    I've written that quickly because it's late and I'm tired, but I can try and look a bit more into it and PM you later if you want.
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    Thanks for the responses, I was pretty sure there was no short or properly idiomatic way to express this, and I was right
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    (Original post by Xurvi)
    Que introduces a new clause that give more information much like some kind of complex adjective
    Qui replaces the subject (and consequently is followed by a verb)
    au/à la/aux ~quel(le)(s) is used when you want to reverse the subject and indirect complement in a sentence: je pense à un film - le film auquel je pense. Le/la/les quel(le)(s) are pronouns that are pretty much like which (choice between few possibilities)

    les répliques qu(e)' on aurait pu dire mais auxquelles on ne pensait pas lorsqu'on s'est disputé

    I've written that quickly because it's late and I'm tired, but I can try and look a bit more into it and PM you later if you want.
    Qui and que are fine, it's the au/le/de quel(le)(s) that I have trouble with
    It's OK, I know you're super busy so I'll try and find another Frenchie to explain it. Thanks anyway though
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    (Original post by xmarilynx)
    Qui and que are fine, it's the au/le/de quel(le)(s) that I have trouble with
    It's OK, I know you're super busy so I'll try and find another Frenchie to explain it. Thanks anyway though
    S'ok, I can spare 5 minutes when I eat :p:
    Well, auquel and duquel are made of à/de+lequel. Whether there is a preposition or not depends on the sentence. Faire allusion à quelque chose - la chose à laquelle je fais allusion. Easy.
    The use of le/la/les quel itself is the same as for qui and que, except while qui and que are preceeded by a noun, the adjectifs relatifs le/la/les quel(le)(s) actually refer to this noun (so as to avoid repetition exactly like pronoms personnels il/elle/etc).

    In other words, La chose à laquelle je pense is kind of like La chose qui est la chose que je pense (which is wrong) if you want.
    Or maybe easier to understand:
    les répliques qu' on aurait pu dire mais auxquelles on ne pensait pas lorsqu'on s'est disputé = les répliques qu'on aurait pu dire mais les répliques qu'on ne pensait pas lorsqu'on sait disputé (wrong again, so don't say that).

    It's a bit hard to explain, I need to think of some way to do it better and make sure I don't say wrong things. I hope you got the gist of it though.

    Did you get your plane home then or was it cancelled by the snow?
 
 
 
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