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    I hear it is a highly intensive course, especially since no previous experience of the language is required.

    How many people struggle with the work load?
    How many drop-out?


    I'm serious about taking this course but I wish to know more about it's intensity and difficulty. Also, how many hours are required for self-study per day?

    Thank
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    Unistats gives two results for "Japanese" in Sheffield. Asian studies (this probably incorporates many different programs) has a progression rate of 86% (from year 1 to year 2), with 7% taking a break from study, and 6% leaving with no award. Linguistics has a progression rate of 95% (with 5% taking a break from studies).
    Although you can be sure that not everyone drops out because of work load, reasons for leaving can be very diverse even when not including any academic factors.

    I've heard that the universal suggestion is that you spend 3 hours doing private study for every hour spent in class.
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    (Original post by moonlight_caster)
    I hear it is a highly intensive course, especially since no previous experience of the language is required.

    How many people struggle with the work load?
    How many drop-out?


    I'm serious about taking this course but I wish to know more about it's intensity and difficulty. Also, how many hours are required for self-study per day?

    Thank

    A friends housemate is doing this course - and she said that out of a large group of them she is the only one that hasn't studied it before. Most of the group are half Japanese or have lived in Japan.
    She said it is intensive and also difficult because there is noone in the same situation as you.

    That said, she hasn't dropped out and is finding it intresting!
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    (Original post by mollymustard)
    A friends housemate is doing this course - and she said that out of a large group of them she is the only one that hasn't studied it before. Most of the group are half Japanese or have lived in Japan.
    She said it is intensive and also difficult because there is noone in the same situation as you.
    This is just NOT true at all...

    As far as I know, there isn't even a single person out of the 50+ people doing the course who is half Japanese! If you were half Japanese, you wouldn't be allowed on the course if you spoke like a native, or near enough to that standard. There could be the odd one, but if they were fluent, they wouldn't be allowed on the course. 'Most' of them definately are not half Japanese though, I can assure you.

    Also, I doubt there are any who have actually 'lived' in Japan. 'Lived' in the sense that they have been there for an extensive amoung of years. There are plenty of people who have been to Japan, or stayed there for an extended amount of time. But lived there? As in 'lived' lived... no... highly doubt that! Their Japanese would be too good... especially for the first and second years.

    The truth is, most people on the course are beginners! The are some who have done A-level or GCSE, but by Dec you'll all be at the same level due to the intensity of the course.

    It is an intensive course, but if you have the drive to succeed, you'll be fine!

    DISCLAIMER: I do Korean Studies (Same department) and I know lots of Japanese students from year 1 - 4.
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    (Original post by 0w3n-69)
    This is just NOT true at all...

    As far as I know, there isn't even a single person out of the 50+ people doing the course who is half Japanese! If you were half Japanese, you wouldn't be allowed on the course if you spoke like a native, or near enough to that standard. There could be the odd one, but if they were fluent, they wouldn't be allowed on the course. 'Most' of them definately are not half Japanese though, I can assure you.

    Also, I doubt there are any who have actually 'lived' in Japan. 'Lived' in the sense that they have been there for an extensive amoung of years. There are plenty of people who have been to Japan, or stayed there for an extended amount of time. But lived there? As in 'lived' lived... no... highly doubt that! Their Japanese would be too good... especially for the first and second years.

    The truth is, most people on the course are beginners! The are some who have done A-level or GCSE, but by Dec you'll all be at the same level due to the intensity of the course.

    It is an intensive course, but if you have the drive to succeed, you'll be fine!

    DISCLAIMER: I do Korean Studies (Same department) and I know lots of Japanese students from year 1 - 4.
    Okay fair enough, you probably know more than me but I am literally telling you what I have been told by my friends housemate. She is the only girl in her group that didn't already know how to write any chinese, all had studied it to some level before. The point is - most of those on the course are not 'beginners' as the course title would suggest.
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    My best friend at Sheffield is studying Japanese. She has A LOT of work to do, I think its something like 25 new symbols she has to learn a week. Shes getting really good grades at the moment and she really enjoys it. I think that aslong as your dedicated, interested in Japanese culture and willing to put in the hours you'll be fine.

    Also there are no Japanese or half-Japanese students in her year.

    Regarding the hours of self study needed: it entirely depends on how well you want to do. My friend gets language and grammar homework each week and she takes about 3-4 hours doing both and shes getting 2.1's atm. Obviously you have to do other work and maybe essays as well if you take the Japanese History module. x
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    Owen is correct there is no half Japanese or people who have lived in Japan on the course in Sheffield. There are a lot of people with prior knowledge but not everyone (including myself.) It takes a lot of self study but its enjoyable, well should be, if not then maybe its not for you. The language is the best part, its the extra modules *cough* Japanese history *cough* that makes the course unenjoyable. Owen knows what i mean.
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    Lots drop out. My flatmate from last year does Chinese and Japanese and has lived in both countries for a few months prior to uni and finds it hard. She said that half the people in her class have dropped out/changed courses but if you genuinely want to pursue the course then I'd say go for it. From what I hear it's a really highly rated department and you'll get a lot out of it!

    If you do decide that Japanese isn't your thing however, the Russian department is really good too! :P
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    Hey - just curious, did you take the Japanese course at Sheffield in the end? I'm a second year, I imagine I would've been first year when you were fourth year if my maths isn't wrong, if you came here.
 
 
 
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