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    Hi, I am just doing my politics essay. I am quite far into it, but I am beginning to find the last question rather tough. I know I have only written about 4 lines ... and it's a 25 marks question. Also, an "experts-proof-read" would be nice of questions 1a, and 1b.

    Regards,

    1a) Define Representative Democracy (5 marks)

    Representative Democracy, which is often known as parliamentary democracy in the UK, is a form of democracy in which the votes elect or appoint representatives to make decisions on their behalf, rather than on those making the decisions. The votes are not necessarily directly involved in any of the process of legislation or lawmaking, but they decide who has the authority to carry out such tasks. Representative Democracy is especially popular in regions where the number of citizens is so great that direct representation would have the potential of becoming overly complicated or bogged down by so many voices. Some believe that representative democracy is a much less democratic system than it's contrasting form of democracy, direct democracy, in that those representatives may not have the voters of interest. They believe that their representatives may misrepresent them. Others argue that demands made directly by the people are often incoherent and illogical, and that representative democracy can make better sense of thses demands and convert them into practical programmes.

    1b) What are the main features of the UK's democratic system? (10 marks)

    There are various features of the United Kingdoms democratic system. One of which being that Britain has regular, free and fair elections. By large, these elections are free from corruption as Britain has an Independent Electoral Commission, which overseas elections to ensure that they are honestly conducted. All adult citizens both have the right to vote, and stand for election (Unless justifiably disqualified). Another feature being tolerance, in that Britain is known and often admired abroad for its tolerant politics and culture. As long as groups have not challenged the legitimacy of the government, the laws and the security of the state, they have been allowed to flourish and spread their beliefs and philosophies. Additionally, Britain enjoys a free press and free broadcasting. There is no evidence to suggest that the government have ever, or plan to control the information coming from the media. Citizens are exposed to a wide variety of views (political and social), and not all are in agreement with the government and their actions, yet the government do not attempt to limit this. Furthermore, Britain's record of accepting legitimacy and the transfer of power is excellent. There is a high degree of acceptance of the results of elections, and all mainstream parties accept full legitimacy of government. There is little or no violence associated with the main political process. Another feature of the UK's democratic system is in relation to rights and liberties. Britain has signed up to the European Convention on Human Rights and the Social Chapter of the European Union. The accountability of the government is also another feature of the United Kingdom's democratic system. Parliament forces the government to be constantly accountable, requiring ministers to explain and justify their actions and, where necessary, to accept criticism. There is the full reporting of proceedings in parliament and in its committees to ensure that citizens are informed.

    1c) How and why has the UK democratic system been criticised? (25 marks)

    Various aspects of the UK's democratic system has been criticised. One of these criticism's being that Britain has no British Constitution (unlike, e.g., the United States) and therefore no safeguarded set of fundamental laws that set out the limits of government. If Parliament gives its sanction, government can do anything it wishes in Britain. The prerogative, uncontrolled powers of the prime ministers in areas of defence security and governmental procedures are considerable are rarely challenged by parliament. Some also argue that too much of the media is owned by foreigners who are far more interested in making profits oppose to ensuring the proper roe of a free press in a democracy.
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    (Original post by CurtisJB)
    Hi, I am just doing my politics essay. I am quite far into it, but I am beginning to find the last question rather tough. I know I have only written about 4 lines ... and it's a 25 marks question. Also, an "experts-proof-read" would be nice of questions 1a, and 1b.

    Regards,

    1a) Define Representative Democracy (5 marks)

    Representative Democracy, which is often known as parliamentary democracy in the UK, is a form of democracy in which the votes elect or appoint representatives to make decisions on their behalf, rather than on those making the decisions. The votes are not necessarily directly involved in any of the process of legislation or lawmaking, but they decide who has the authority to carry out such tasks. Representative Democracy is especially popular in regions where the number of citizens is so great that direct representation would have the potential of becoming overly complicated or bogged down by so many voices. Some believe that representative democracy is a much less democratic system than it's contrasting form of democracy, direct democracy, in that those representatives may not have the voters of interest. They believe that their representatives may misrepresent them. Others argue that demands made directly by the people are often incoherent and illogical, and that representative democracy can make better sense of thses demands and convert them into practical programmes.

    1b) What are the main features of the UK's democratic system? (10 marks)

    There are various features of the United Kingdoms democratic system. One of which being that Britain has regular, free and fair elections. By large, these elections are free from corruption as Britain has an Independent Electoral Commission, which overseas elections to ensure that they are honestly conducted. All adult citizens both have the right to vote, and stand for election (Unless justifiably disqualified). Another feature being tolerance, in that Britain is known and often admired abroad for its tolerant politics and culture. As long as groups have not challenged the legitimacy of the government, the laws and the security of the state, they have been allowed to flourish and spread their beliefs and philosophies. Additionally, Britain enjoys a free press and free broadcasting. There is no evidence to suggest that the government have ever, or plan to control the information coming from the media. Citizens are exposed to a wide variety of views (political and social), and not all are in agreement with the government and their actions, yet the government do not attempt to limit this. Furthermore, Britain's record of accepting legitimacy and the transfer of power is excellent. There is a high degree of acceptance of the results of elections, and all mainstream parties accept full legitimacy of government. There is little or no violence associated with the main political process. Another feature of the UK's democratic system is in relation to rights and liberties. Britain has signed up to the European Convention on Human Rights and the Social Chapter of the European Union. The accountability of the government is also another feature of the United Kingdom's democratic system. Parliament forces the government to be constantly accountable, requiring ministers to explain and justify their actions and, where necessary, to accept criticism. There is the full reporting of proceedings in parliament and in its committees to ensure that citizens are informed.

    1c) How and why has the UK democratic system been criticised? (25 marks)

    Various aspects of the UK's democratic system has been criticised. One of these criticism's being that Britain has no British Constitution (unlike, e.g., the United States) and therefore no safeguarded set of fundamental laws that set out the limits of government. If Parliament gives its sanction, government can do anything it wishes in Britain. The prerogative, uncontrolled powers of the prime ministers in areas of defence security and governmental procedures are considerable are rarely challenged by parliament. Some also argue that too much of the media is owned by foreigners who are far more interested in making profits oppose to ensuring the proper roe of a free press in a democracy.
    I would be careful of this. You should refer to the uncodified nature of our constitution rather than claiming it does not exist at all, because we certainly do have a British constitution, it's just not set out in a single authoritative document like in the US (the Bill of Rights).

    I'd argue for your last point [1c], more towards the electoral system, and point out that the system we use (first past the post) produces many 'wasted votes' and that a system such as the single transferrable vote has been suggested as a replacement!

    You could also include the quote from Churchill that democracy is the worst form of government until you compare it to all the others.
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    Oh, cheers.

    I amended that.

    Oh, and your from Wirral ... that's where I am from.
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    (Original post by CurtisJB)
    Oh, cheers.

    I amended that.

    Oh, and your from Wirral ... that's where I am from.
    Indeed! Although I'm at uni in London for the time being
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    i have an essay for this already done will post it later after i type it up
 
 
 
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