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    Hey guys

    Thinking of some presents to get the boyfriend for Christmas and I'm looking at some Swiss Army Knives.

    Just wondering if anyone knows if there's any legal issues with them? I'll have a google but just posting in case I don't find anything.

    By legal issues I mean would he get in trouble for having one in his car or whatever?

    P.s. I'm getting him other stuff too, not just this (just before someone says it's a crap present)

    Thanks

    Kaykiie

    P.p.s - This sounds like a silly question after reading it
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    It's a crap present
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    (Original post by 4TSR)
    It's a crap present
    Har har har.

    I'll be the judge of that funny guy.
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    Great idea. I think as long as the blade is below 3 inches then there's no legal issue...
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    I think it's a good present There's a legal length after which a knife can't be possessed in public. Pen knives are definitely OK though.
    • TSR Support Team
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    I hope it's this one. :p:
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    There shouldn't be any legal issues with a Swiss Army Knife
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    that would be very handy however is on the expensive side
    • Thread Starter
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    I was genuinely looking at that one on Amazon :p: (Not within my price range though )
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    I was genuinely looking at that one on Amazon :p: (Not within my price range though )
    I'm not sure how you'd even be able to use the knife at the end! The other few hundred miles of metal would get in the way!
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    Sounds like a good idea to me!

    Last time I checked, to be legal, the blade has to be less than or equal to 3.5 inches long, and must not be able to lock out (like a flick/butterfly knife), unless you have a specific reason eg. a 7 inch bread cutting knife being used by a chef would be justifiable if questioned.

    I find the models with scissors on them extremely useful.

    Hope this helped a bit!
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    This is the best value Swiss Army Knife out there imo - http://www.heinnie.com/product.asp?s...=199&P_ID=4537

    ...but not at all suitable for what you are looking for. It has a locking blade - while these are infinitely better than regular folding blades they are illegal to carry without good reason in a public place (defence does not constitute a good reason, on my way to a camping site normally). Secondly, the cutting blade is over 3 inches. If you want to carry a knife around in a public place it must have a non-locking folding blade with a cutting edge of 3 inches or less.
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    (Original post by Hawiz)
    they are illegal to carry without good reason in a public place (defence does not constitute a good reason, on my way to a camping site normally)
    Just out of interest, are they any other well-known acceptable reasons to carry one?
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    (Original post by IQ Test)
    Sounds like a good idea to me!

    Last time I checked, to be legal, the blade has to be less than or equal to 3.5 inches long, and must not be able to lock out (like a flick/butterfly knife), unless you have a specific reason eg. a 7 inch bread cutting knife being used by a chef would be justifiable if questioned.

    I find the models with scissors on them extremely useful.

    Hope this helped a bit!
    Thanks

    All (well most of) the replies helped Just wanted to make sure I wasn't going to be getting him in trouble if he kept it in his car (which is where he always seems to need tools that he doesn't have the space to keep in there).

    The one I'm looking at: Swiss army tool
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    I'd buy one even if it didn't have a knife to be honest. It's more because he's always looking for a tool when he doesn't have them in his car. The ones I'm looking at have various tools on as well as a knife.

    Reading horror stories of people being arrested over having them either on them or in their cars on the internet :rolleyes:
    • TSR Group Staff
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    I'd recommend getting a Wenger knife, they're a lot nicer to use in general. Victorinox are still good though (and supposedly more durable), but having used both I'd go for a Wenger knife every time. :yep:
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    Why do you want to give him a swiss army knife?
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    (Original post by Beska)
    Just out of interest, are they any other well-known acceptable reasons to carry one?
    This page is a nice reference when it comes to UK knife laws. It mentions on that page

    "If you wish to carry a larger knife then you must have 'reasonable cause'. That means that you must be able to prove that you had a genuine reason for carrying the knife.

    You may carry a larger cutting tool if it is associated with your work (for instance a chef may carry a 9.0" butchers knife roll to and from work), or if it is associated with your sport, (for instance a fisherman may carry a 6.0" fillet knife, or a hunter may carry a 4.0" fixed blade hunting knife)."

    I used camping as an example because I have taken my large Becker knife camping (12.5 inches overall), and while I have never been stopped, I am confident if I was stopped and questioned I wouldn't have any trouble. Baring in mind I have hiking clothing on and a large rucksack full of weekend gear. The law isn't specific about this area - it's down to police discretion.
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    (Original post by IQ Test)
    Last time I checked, to be legal, the blade has to be less than or equal to 3.5 inches long, and must not be able to lock out (like a flick/butterfly knife), unless you have a specific reason eg. a 7 inch bread cutting knife being used by a chef would be justifiable if questioned.
    The locking can be an issue with some products e.g. most Leatherman multi-tools which have a little metal flap which clicks out and holds the blade open. I think most Swiss army knives don't have this feature though, owing to the fact that they tend to be designed to be carriable for everyday use. The reason I mention this specifically is because some people seem to think the locking blade rule refers only to flick / butterfly knives (i.e. ones that look like they're designed as weapons) when actually it potentially outlaws a lot of ordinary multi-tools too! (If you are carrying them without a specific purpose.)

    Which is really annoying, as locking blades are much nicer (and safer) to use as tools, though I guess if used as a weapon you could do more damage with one as they're stiffer than non-locking ones.

    BTW - another thing on the legality, I believe that when you talk about a knife being "legal to carry" this is referring to you having it on your person (or nearby) - so in a pocket, on your belt, in a bag, or in the glove box or door pocket of a car. Basically what matters is that it's immediately accessible and deployable as a weapon. This means that if you keep something in the boot of your car (say as part of your emergency kit) it does not have the length, locking etc restrictions as you are not "carrying" it and can't get to it easily. Of course the moment you get it out in a public place, if you do so without reason, you are then committing an offence!

    (Original post by Beska)
    Just out of interest, are they any other well-known acceptable reasons to carry one?
    Lots of people who have some hands-on aspect to their work will carry on their belt a multi-tool such as a Leatherman, Gerber or Swisstool, which normally feature a locking knife. The example I'm most familiar with is the theatre techie - you never know when you're going to have to rewire a plug in a hurry, fix a prop or somebody's radio mic etc and often in fairly high-pressure circumstances (no time to go find the tool(s) out of your bag, "the show must go on"). A lot of people who buy things like this have no specific use that they want one of the tools in particular for (if they did they'd just buy, and carry, the proper tool) but they want the peace of mind of being able to carry on them something for every situation, so they get one of these.

    A lot of it probably depends on where you are - in Cambridge I would often carry a multi-tool (with locking blade) whether or not I was going to the theatre, which was technically illegal, because I knew that I wouldn't get stopped. In Birmingham I never do this and it remains safely in my bag until I actually need it!
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    (Original post by kristinaalovesu)
    Why do you want to give him a swiss army knife?
    Because it's cool.
 
 
 
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