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    Dear Students,

    Some of you really do live in a fantasy world, how do you expect the government to fund you all? There are so many of you, so many of you who will not bring money back to the country as a result of your studies. Some of you won't use your degree at all.

    Not your fault, but there should be more calls - from you lot - for more radical solutions. Being radical is a step towards being practical, in this case.

    Many years ago, the government and taxpayers invested in our country's brightest minds. You may argue that elitism and class go hand in hand, but I don't buy that - Alan Bennett and Melvyn Bragg went to Oxford, both working class, and brilliant.

    Nowadays, the government and taxpayer subsidise our studies. This unfortunately lumps the bad with the good, and that can't be good at all. University is all about elitism, that's what it's built upon. It is NOT a kindergarten.

    Surely you realise, the best thing for the UK as a whole is - having more of an emphasis on people training locally at colleges and centres while getting on the job/property ladder - courses more linked to local, regional and national companies.

    Because, University is an academic arena for those seeking knowledge. Knowledge should be shared, but is not something that needs to be obsessed over by every corner of society.

    Hopefully, University places will be cut, some centralised bureaucratic institutions will be close and split into local colleges, and Britain will benefit as a result.

    This opinion of mine is based on not only my socialist values, but what has happened to my mother and my hometown in the last eighteen months. Rolle College was a specialist teaching college, attached to the University of Plymouth, in Exmouth.

    It did a lot of good for the town, many teachers training could find their feet at our primary schools - in the South West children are more friendly and life in general is more laid back than in inner cities obviously. Exmouth Community College is the second largest school in the UK, so it gave aspiring teachers a flavour of both worlds.

    Rolle College was closed two years ago, and staff were forced to either take redundancy or work in Plymouth, where the complex was being expanded. This has had a terrible effect on Exmouth, which has lost a whole generation and is dying on its knees (nightclubs are closing, shops are closing, people are leaving).

    This might be a one-off, but I think this is the effect of having these massive University campuses.

    What do you all think? Perhaps I haven't explained myself too much in places, but incidentally, I think the government's tuition fees thing is necessary if they don't want the other alternative. Obviously, it's a bloody shame that they have no other alternative for young people.

    Raising the school leaving age to 18, while making Universities harder to get into and more costly - an attack on the working class, almost.
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    (Original post by PJMillar)
    Dear Students,

    Some of you really do live in a fantasy world, how do you expect the government to fund you all? There are so many of you, so many of you who will not bring money back to the country as a result of your studies. Some of you won't use your degree at all.

    There are some that will pay more than enough to cover the loans and thousands in tax on top of that to cover the rest. How do think it was done before? Yes I know only 5% went to uni and now its 35% but that's obviously due to letting in lower grade standards - they should up the entry requirements so only the exceptionally academic can go and they should get it funded, as in the old days.

    Not your fault, but there should be more calls - from you lot - for more radical solutions. Being radical is a step towards being practical, in this case.

    Many years ago, the government and taxpayers invested in our country's brightest minds. You may argue that elitism and class go hand in hand, but I don't buy that - Alan Bennett and Melvyn Bragg went to Oxford, both working class, and brilliant.

    Nowadays, the government and taxpayer subsidise our studies. This unfortunately lumps the bad with the good, and that can't be good at all. University is all about elitism, that's what it's built upon. It is NOT a kindergarten.

    Surely you realise, the best thing for the UK as a whole is - having more of an emphasis on people training locally at colleges and centres while getting on the job/property ladder - courses more linked to local, regional and national companies.

    Yes because that's going to happen when the waiting list for plumbing/electrician at some colleges is 3-4 years - which shows how many there are around. Why should people have to settle for less of a job just because the government would rather bail out Vodafone & Topman for billions in tax and waste foreign aid giving it to corrupt governments rather than funding the future of Britain?
    Also, most employers in certain fields won't even look at you with just a college education - this is definitely true in the IT field - I was lucky, I got my current job due to my father knowing people but, I still need to go to university in 2011 due to my employers saying I need to broaden my knowledge.


    Because, University is an academic arena for those seeking knowledge. Knowledge should be shared, but is not something that needs to be obsessed over by every corner of society.

    The more learning the better. Having too many graduates is not an issue as they can always go abroad and get jobs - especially considering UK degrees are worth something overseas in a lot of countries - the issue becomes when do not have enough graduates in a field and things need to be done.

    Hopefully, University places will be cut, some centralised bureaucratic institutions will be close and split into local colleges, and Britain will benefit as a result.

    Entry requirements need to go up and the tuition fees should stay down or be cut altogether to fund education for the brightest.

    This opinion of mine is based on not only my socialist values, but what has happened to my mother and my hometown in the last eighteen months. Rolle College was a specialist teaching college, attached to the University of Plymouth, in Exmouth.

    It did a lot of good for the town, many teachers training could find their feet at our primary schools - in the South West children are more friendly and life in general is more laid back than in inner cities obviously. Exmouth Community College is the second largest school in the UK, so it gave aspiring teachers a flavour of both worlds.

    Rolle College was closed two years ago, and staff were forced to either take redundancy or work in Plymouth, where the complex was being expanded. This has had a terrible effect on Exmouth, which has lost a whole generation and is dying on its knees (nightclubs are closing, shops are closing, people are leaving).

    This might be a one-off, but I think this is the effect of having these massive University campuses.

    I doubt it as you have said some went to work in Plymouth - don't forget, people are losing their jobs in almost every sector (apart from Politics) so I reckon its more of all of them contributing factors which has led to such a thing. It's happening all over so you are not alone - Surely you find it sickening that the government can let Vodafone & Topman off massive tax bills yet we get bugger all? The working class that fuels Britain every day gets left with nothing again.

    What do you all think? Perhaps I haven't explained myself too much in places, but incidentally, I think the government's tuition fees thing is necessary if they don't want the other alternative. Obviously, it's a bloody shame that they have no other alternative for young people.

    Yes there is - raise entry requirements so then students try harder to get to university - graduates will be deemed more clever so businesses will value a degree more highly - less will graduate due to less getting the highest grades so all in all it will be a good result. It will also cut out those that get a BBC at A level and decide to get on a Mickey Mouse course for the university experience. Then, as their will be a lot less to fund, they could provide a service free. At present, they are not providing a service, they are selling a product which has been mentioned in another thread. Education is supposed to be a public service - well it definitely isn't under our Labour & now the coalition - they should look at other countries systems.

    Raising the school leaving age to 18, while making Universities harder to get into and more costly - an attack on the working class, almost.
    Not really - I know loads of working class with AAA at A level and are extremely intellectually gifted - one of them hard a very hard upbringing and nearly turned to hard drugs - life is only what you make of it and besides, we all get free education upto 17,18 anyway. Maybe school/college standards would go up as many will work harder rather than peeing about whilst taking the minimum grade to get into university. Entry requirements are the answer, not the price.
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    While you claim for socialist views, isn't the ideas of elitism and class division a very capitalist idea?

    Problem is the town I'm living in had the opposite problem - when the local college and university were separate, the town enjoyed a fantastic student population and growing reputation, but when the university chose to merge with the local college people thought the university was dropping in standards, and now the reputation is gone, and the university has all but assimilated with the college, not the other way around.

    I'm not saying the college is a worse place to be, but the fact is sometimes breaking universities up have the reverse effect on the local community than you think. Perhaps a gradual increase in universities is an overall increase in education standards, contributing to the nation more professionals. I speak of this with the contradicting hope of wanting less competition in my future career, but isn't the government supposed to offer equal opportunities to everybody, regardless of their social standings? Or why do we have these pointless funds and bursaries?

    Lasting, people can argue entry requirements have gone down, but the fact remains more students are enjoying a better secondary education and more are pursuing a professional career than a generation ago. Regardless of how high the entry requirements, as long as society is putting education in an increasingly important position, the number of students won't go down.

    You want more people to go to colleges? Make society to stop worshipping HE. But let's face it, it's their choice, how can you do anything?
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    (Original post by PJMillar)
    Dear Students,

    Some of you really do live in a fantasy world, how do you expect the government to fund you all? There are so many of you, so many of you who will not bring money back to the country as a result of your studies. Some of you won't use your degree at all.
    1. We have enough money to go to war in Iraq, pay for nuclear weapons research, bail out the banks, allow oligarchs to have billions in unpaid tax bills not to mention Vodafone. It's a question of priorities. We have money, just depends what we're willing to spend it on. How does Scotland manage on a smaller budget to pay for uni?

    It's fantasy to spend billions on the above and to neglect education. You couldn't make it up.

    2. Yes, I think we have too many people going to university who will not end up in graduate jobs, so yes perhaps cut student numbers

    3. University benefits society and the economy, not just the individual. It's an investment in the future of the country

    4. The new system does not give unis more money. The gov't is cutting teaching budgets by some 80% and students will make up the shortfall. In the long term, the new system will not save the gov't money - who is funding all the massive student loans for years to come? It just looks better on gov't books. Student loans are not counted as borrowed money by the gov't so it looks better for them. Watch the debate in the House of Lords for more info. The new system does not save money!!! It's just a way to hide gov't debt
 
 
 
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