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OK... so at what point in history... Watch

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    ...did someone decide to pour milk into their tea?

    considering tea is traditionally consumed as tea leaves mixed in hot water i.e chinese, arabic etc. at what point did someone think, "hang on, its missing summat!" - and why did it have to be milk? or was it discovered by accident, like a jug of milk spilt over the teapot and mixed into the tea and people ended up liking it. its an odd yet interesting thought, i wonder if anyone knows any facts or sources about the origins of mixing milk in tea.


    p.s i'm a deep thinker and do tend to ponder over odd facts - and yes it came to me during a tea moment
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    Funny story, its actually recent.
    There was an explosion in a milk plant, some milk splashed over a cafe, the rest is history
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    It could be: An english explorer burnt himself having a cuppa. All he had with him was his trusty cow, and he'd much rather put milk in to cool it down than any other bodily fluids.

    He was also really thirsty so couldn't leave it for a bit
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    I can't say I've thought about it, but now you've mentioned it its going to bug me.
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    (Original post by Something_Ironic)
    Funny story, its actually recent.
    There was an explosion in a milk plant, some milk splashed over a cafe, the rest is history
    plausable explanation :holmes:
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    (Original post by Tabers)
    I can't say I've thought about it, but now you've mentioned it its going to bug me.
    well you'l know how i feel now - been buggin me for a while and i need answers
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    The phrase, 'does it really matter?' comes to mind
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    (Original post by jharrington93)
    It could be: An english explorer burnt himself having a cuppa. All he had with him was his trusty cow, and he'd much rather put milk in to cool it down than any other bodily fluids.

    He was also really thirsty so couldn't leave it for a bit
    haha most plausable explanation so far - actually makes sense. plus i agree its connected to the english in some way, its gotta be
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    One day a new mother was drinking tea, and then her tits started leaking.
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    (Original post by jharrington93)
    It could be: An english explorer burnt himself having a cuppa. All he had with him was his trusty cow, and he'd much rather put milk in to cool it down than any other bodily fluids.

    He was also really thirsty so couldn't leave it for a bit
    Imagine he had his 'trusty horse' instead. Oh boy.

    :lol:
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    (Original post by Bektas)
    Imagine he had his 'trusty horse' instead. Oh boy.

    :lol:
    ah, but then he would have a choice of 3 - one being solid and 2 being liquid
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    Instinctively, I feel that it is a British Victorian phenomenon but I am probably wrong.

    However, this link states otherwise: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea
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    7th March 1733, around 3:20pm. Barely any clouds in the sky. A British Aristocrat club drinking game takes a turn for the worse...
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    It's a good question. There's so much food/drink related stuff that makes you think - how did they find out that worked?
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    (Original post by sandys1000)
    It's a good question. There's so much food/drink related stuff that makes you think - how did they find out that worked?
    Indeed. I like the way you think - and i agree, like who decided to remove all the grains from wheat, dry it, pound it - then spill water in it, make a dough and then most of all stick it in a fire! so many more things but for now im still invetigating this tea and milk riddle :cool:
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    (Original post by JK471993)
    Instinctively, I feel that it is a British Victorian phenomenon but I am probably wrong.

    However, this link states otherwise: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tea
    hmm, intresting and thanks. and i agree with you - which explains why in India (i.e Pakistan/India and surrounding) the tea is made with milk i.e. Desi Cha. Mayeb it started during the British Rule and the tradition continued :holmes:
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    (Original post by OxfordGoBrach)
    7th March 1733, around 3:20pm. Barely any clouds in the sky. A British Aristocrat club drinking game takes a turn for the worse...
    LOL very precise information. i like
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    (Original post by Peace0fM1nd)
    Indeed. I like the way you think - and i agree, like who decided to remove all the grains from wheat, dry it, pound it - then spill water in it, make a dough and then most of all stick it in a fire! so many more things but for now im still invetigating this tea and milk riddle :cool:
    I wonder who first decided to drink their mouldy fruit juice?
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    (Original post by OxfordGoBrach)
    7th March 1733, around 3:20pm. Barely any clouds in the sky. A British Aristocrat club drinking game takes a turn for the worse...
    The first known addition of milk in tea was actually by the French in the 1680s :p:

    http://www.2basnob.com/tea-history-timeline.html
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    (Original post by Jane eyre)
    The first known addition of milk in tea was actually by the French in the 1680s :p:

    http://www.2basnob.com/tea-history-timeline.html
    Sorry, that was a typo. I meant 1633. Thanks for flagging it up.

    True, it was mentioned in the letters of Madam de Sevigne in the 1680s but all intelligent scholars maintain that a group of rich, intoxicated young British Aristocrats stumbled upon the idea around 50 years earlier in the Caribbean.
 
 
 
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