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I want to watch a Nihilistic film Watch

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    I feel like watching a film with nihilistic themes, something similar to Trainspotting, Fight Club and the Machinist.
    Any suggestions guys?
    Cheers
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    No one, this make me sad

    :sad:
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    hm i've never thought of trainspotting as a nihilistic film. interesting.

    sorry, i don't actually have anything useful to contribute, just thought i'd try and alleviate your loneliness

    google "nihilistic films"? works for me aha
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    what is nihilistic
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    e.g. got this off a nihilist propaganda website (o.O)
    Rope (1948) Two wealthy college-age types decide to enact the philosophical views of their mentor professor and commit a murder in the belief that "moral concepts don't hold for the intellectually superior”. They then hold a party and discuss the merits of murder. The conversation goes, if murder should be allowed, but only committed by the superior against the inferior, then who defines superior and inferior? "Me". The professor deduces what really occurred and is horrified at what his words have been twisted to support. The ending of the film reveals the little flaw in the philosophy, the main reason why we don't freelance murder -- you just reap what you sow. Apart from the story the film is still interesting for the experimental format (in color) that Hitchcock used to turn his movie into a play without edits.

    V for Vendetta (2005), is rewarding entertainment for anarchists and nihilists alike. The movie, based on Alan Moore’s graphic novel and character of the same name, follows V as he sets about to exact revenge and take-down a sinister police-state in fictional near-future England. V uses a series of ingenious schemes to foil authorities while simultaneously motivating the people to seize back control from a despotic elite exploiting religion, fear and television to placate the public. The film does a keen job of depicting the use of spin on video news and entertainment by nefarious authorities in order to always depict their angle of events, forming a monopoly on false-truth. V: “Beneath this mask is more than just flesh, beneath this mask is an idea. And ideas are bulletproof.” Although just a fictional story, the movie nonetheless reminds us that a calculated campaign of terrorism can be quite effective at undermining a corrupt and violent establishment, as shown through the masked and theatrical character of V.

    Personally, the most entertaining Batman remains Batman the Movie (1966), and of course the television series of the same time-period, now that’s hilarious fun! But when you get tired of the laughs there's the 2008 film The Dark Knight (Blu-Ray) for nihilistic mention. Dark Knight makes full use of the film noir elements of contemporary Batman to make a dark and intense action flick where the villain, the Joker, adopts aspects of nihilism to act as an interesting foil against the quasi-hero of Batman. Although the Joker is portrayed as a criminal psychotic, by the second half of the lengthy film he begins to explain his motivations and indeed much of the Joker’s efforts are an attempt to show how foolish authorities are to try and control every aspect of society, going so far as to portray himself as an agent of chaos; “You know, the thing about chaos? It’s fair.” At another point the Joker sets fire to a mountain of the mafia's money saying, “It’s not about money, it’s about sending a message: everything burns.” The Joker points out that the way people behave under duress is often radically different than under typical circumstances, that civilization is composed of tenuous and often illusionary elements that only serve to mask true human nature. Of course the overall presentation could easily be considered anti-nihilist because the Joker’s character is intended as an emblem to be reviled, nevertheless this fictional film clearly portrays how a ‘madman’ can shatter illusions and radically reorder popular assumptions.

    Punishment Park (1971) directed by Peter Watkins and shot in documentary style, the film is set in the early 70s where Constitutional law has been suspended and political ‘criminals’ are overloading the prison system so Punishment Park in the desert is created as an alternative. Convicted in a bogus court they race to reach a U.S. flag in hopes of being set free while being hunted by the police and military. This is a film that will spark discussion on the issues of authority, politics, oppression, and violence within society.

    Daisies (1966) There’s an enchanting personal attraction to any artistic creation that is so innovative or outrageous that it defies categorization. The 1966 Czech film Daisies directed by Vera Chytilova is just that and, not surprisingly, it is considered a nihilistic film. The two main characters, both bored young women named Marie, conclude from what they see around them that the world is bad, consequently they should be bad too and so they proceed to engage in a series of silly and destructive antics. They date older men just to get a free meal then ditch them on the train, hold an existential discussion in a bathtub full of milk, and mostly eat like messy pigs anywhere and everywhere with unusual and creative film and sound techniques in between. Daisies is part Kafkaesque surrealism, part social commentary with a comedic flair.

    No Man’s Land (2001) This movie came to my attention as recommendation from a reader of this website. It reveals the absurdity of events within a civil war by placing both sides together, a Bosnian and a Serb, trapped between lines. It’s a war film but with a very distinct difference in that it criticizes not just a futile conflict but all of the other participants as well from peacekeeping forces to the mass media, while also challenging the myth of political neutrality. The film doesn’t offer any particular resolution to the basic problem but it does poignantly demonstrate that once involved in a conflict there may not be any practical way to get out, a message especially germane to another civil war -- the one in war-torn Iraq.

    Falling Down (1993) features the delightfully unappealing Michael Douglas as one angry dude pushed way past his limit and set against an inhospitable society. Leonard Maltin gives it two and a half stars!

    For a wild ride try David Lynch's Eraserhead. It's intriguing, odd and you'll probably need to see it twice. I would call it Kafka-esque but you might use other words. But if that's too weird see the over-the-top movie Diabolik, also titled Danger: Diabolik, from the 1960s. Diabolik is like a nihilized version of James Bond who's sole interest is self-enrichment and defying authority. "This criminal paranoid [Diabolik] seems to have dedicated himself to a one man fight against our society!" The sex-scene in piles of money is unforgettable, who says positive media role models don't exist anymore?!

    Shell-shocked film director Oliver Stone has had plenty of misses and a few hits to his credit. The realistic Vietnam movie Platoon (1986) and the easily misunderstood, not-so-realistic Natural Born Killers (1994) are two films worth mention here. Oliver Stone in his own words (audio clip): Natural Born Killers & social hypocrisy

    Trainspotting (1996) directed by Danny Boyle is a satire that follows, in graphic detail, the lives of a group of young grade-A ****-ups as they roller coaster through the dizzying highs and terrifying lows of heroin addiction in Scotland. Trainspotting reveals, perhaps unintentionally, the latent desperation for context and the urgent need to feel something, anything, amidst an absence of meaning in the synthetic, desensitized realm of post-modern pseudo-existence.

    A good indicator of a stereotypical nihilistic film or story is one where all or most of the main characters die at the end. Think of Hamlet for instance, that’s a good example but just a suggestion not a recommendation; never liked the guy (Shakespeare). Instead watch the far more entertaining movie Red Zone Cuba (1966), and at least the characters die trying! See the Mystery Science Theater 3000 version of Red Zone Cuba (1997), it’s hilarious.
    i especially like the idea of the first one, sounds like Nietzsche, who i have a small obsession with (:
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    ohh, i get it, the recurring theme is the nature of morality and the choices in life
    which is, in fact, what trainspotting's about

    woo
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    (Original post by theths)
    e.g. got this off a nihilist propaganda website (o.O)


    i especially like the idea of the first one, sounds like Nietzsche, who i have a small obsession with (:
    Nietzsche !

    How about a ... book? I don't know much about films, but if you like Nietzsche, you probably like books, so perhaps try some Jean Paul Sartre, or Dostoevsky for starters ?
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    Synecdoche New York. Seriously, the epitome of nihilism.
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    (Original post by theths)
    e.g. got this off a nihilist propaganda website (o.O)


    i especially like the idea of the first one, sounds like Nietzsche, who i have a small obsession with (:
    Yes, Rope is a really good film Hitchcock rulez. That is all.
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    Nietzsche !

    How about a ... book? I don't know much about films, but if you like Nietzsche, you probably like books, so perhaps try some Jean Paul Sartre, or Dostoevsky for starters ?
    i adore books
    thank you, yay. any particular titles?
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    American Psycho?

    Way better than 7.4 suggests :P
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    (Original post by mimimimi)
    Yes, Rope is a really good film Hitchcock rulez. That is all.
    Yeah, I gathered, but so far i've only seen Psycho and Vertigo. They were both amazing, so definitely on seeing more (:
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    Waiting for Godot..?
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    (Original post by theths)
    i adore books
    thank you, yay. any particular titles?


    Um um, Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky! Raskolnikov can be a bit annoying sometimes, bear with him though.
    Also The Brothers Karamazov - Dostoevsky. It can be scarily emotional though.
    Jean Paul Sartre's Age of Reason books Though more Existentialist..
    I've heard Kafka is a Nihilist - I haven't read any of his works yet.
    Orwell's stuff obviously You've probably read him.

    Edit: Just realised how many times I typed "though".
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    (Original post by theths)
    Yeah, I gathered, but so far i've only seen Psycho and Vertigo. They were both amazing, so definitely on seeing more (:
    Ooh yes, definitely see Rope then. And Rear Window. I think Rear Window is my favourite film of his, it's really tense and super.
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    why do you want to watch a nihilistic film there's no point
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    There was this really interesting silent film by Carl von Dreyer, but if only I could remember the name...
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    (Original post by Ideot)
    Um um, Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky! Raskolnikov can be a bit annoying sometimes, bear with him though.
    Crime and Punishment is great. If you liked the sound of the film 'Rope', you should like it. The plots are both based around the similar theme of people believing they deserve to murder someone...
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    (Original post by beecher)
    why do you want to watch a nihilistic film there's no point
    lol.
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    (Original post by mimimimi)
    Crime and Punishment is great. If you liked the sound of the film 'Rope', you should like it. The plots are both based around the similar theme of people believing they deserve to murder someone...
    Hmm, okay thanks, I'll watch it - haven't seen a good film in a while :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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