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Skiing/Snowboarding - Do you wear a helmet? Watch

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    Going on my first snowboarding holiday soon, over new year, after a few sessions on the indoor snow ski slope (chill factor manchester) and i've been accquiring some gear for it - jacket, pants, gloves, goggles etc. One thing i've heard mixed opinions on - should I be wearing a helmet? I know as a beginner I should, i'm more likely to make mistakes and injure myself - plus it's just good sense, but out of curiosity, out of you skiers/snowboarders, how many of you wear helmets?

    All I can find, opinion wise, is either 'wouldnt be seen dead without one' or 'naw, ive never had an accident in 43534543 years of boarding, dont bother' + the shiny ski equipment brochures have people NOT wearing helmets

    I'm going to wear one, but who here actually does when boarding/skiing?
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    I wear one for ski touring.
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    Well as a matter of fact i do myself, and i've been snowboarding for about 7 years now. I think of it like; you wear a helmet to go cycling right? well how is snowboarding/skiing any less dangerous? You might think snow is soft, but actually there's plenty of hard compacted stuff and of course icey sections so - is it worth risking brain damage?

    On another note, the helmet also keeps your head lovely and warm, better than hats (plus they don't fall off when you crash). And give you a confidence boost! I feel much safer wearing one especially when tackling those black runs!
    So yeah I would recommend wearing them, and tbh you'll find nowadays the majority of people wear them on the slopes too!
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    When I used to snowboard I wore a helmet
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    yes
    and all sensible people do
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    Always. Everyone in our family does. I'd never ski without one. Ski slopes are not full of lovely fluffy snow, even if the top layer of snow is fresh the ground is generally hard and icy; you fall over/get in an accident on it and you could do yourself serious damage, and better the helmet takes the brunt of it than your head.

    Although I live in Switzerland and it's weird that you never see kids without helmets (they have to have one when they go on school trips for example), but parents that are with them (or even ski instructors) think nothing of not wearing one; I mean why do they think the same reason their kids wear one doesn't apply to them? I'd say the majority of people do wear them though. And they do keep your head much warmer than a woolly hat.

    You might also want to check any health/accident insurance you have for skiing/snowboarding, and see if that says anything about safety equipment such as helmets. Sometimes those sorts of things require you to wear one to be valid.
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    I wear a helmet even though I'm a competent skier, and have never had any accident in my 7 years of skiing (only one in my family to not have injured themselves skiing!)

    At the end of the day, it only takes one accident to damage you, so IMO it's worth wearing one, no matter how good you are.

    If you buy one rather than renting one you can get some quite nice ones =D
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    iv been to a 2 indoor ski places, 1 outside dry slope and skiing in italy as well (tried snowboarding but wasnt a fan) i didnt bother with a helmet any time i went and never saw anyone else wearing a helmet either, just a hat to keep head and ears warm. dont think its necessary but if you wanna wear one then feel free to.
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    I don't wear any clothes when I go skiing.
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    (Original post by greeneyedgirl)
    I wear a helmet even though I'm a competent skier, and have never had any accident in my 7 years of skiing (only one in my family to not have injured themselves skiing!)

    At the end of the day, it only takes one accident to damage you, so IMO it's worth wearing one, no matter how good you are.

    If you buy one rather than renting one you can get some quite nice ones =D
    This, but with even more time skiing. Though no one in my family has had a major accident skiing yet we all wear helmets.
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    Nah, I didn't, and I never saw anyone wearing a helmet during my whole week on the mountains.
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    (Original post by vickie89)
    iv been to a 2 indoor ski places, 1 outside dry slope and skiing in italy as well (tried snowboarding but wasnt a fan) i didnt bother with a helmet any time i went and never saw anyone else wearing a helmet either, just a hat to keep head and ears warm. dont think its necessary but if you wanna wear one then feel free to.
    You don't think it's necessary?! Here are some facts:
    Depending on which study you look at helmets reduce brain injuries between 50-80%
    "In over 400 skiers and snowboarders with TBIs (traumatic brain injuries) serious enough to warrant transfer and admission to our level I trauma center, only five were wearing helmets. All five patients had mild injuries and made full recoveries despite some very major mechanisms. Our most severely injured helmeted patient to date was a snowboarder who went off a 40 foot cliff and landed on his head, cracking his helmet in half. He sustained a severe concussion (or mild diffuse axonal injury) with loss of consciousness, but had a negative CT scan of the head. He did require inpatient rehabilitation, but ultimately has made a full recovery and is now attending college. All the rest of the helmeted skiers and snowboarders had mild concussions and negative CT scans. Among the unhelmeted only 69% had simple concussions with negative CT scans of the head. The rest had more severe injuries such as cerebral contusions, or subdural, epidural or intracerebral hematomas. Severe TBI, with coma and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3-8, occurred in 15% of the unhelmeted skiers and snowboarders with head injuries, and their overall mortality rate after admission to the hospital was 4%."


    Also if you don't care about your health it is linked with skill levels too:
    According to the 2008/09 NSAA National Demographic Study: Helmet usage increases with ability level - 26% of beginners wore a helmet compared to 55% of advanced riders.
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    Nope, and I've done a fair bit of skiing. And generally people I have skiied with haven't worn helmets either. Certainly it is more sensible to wear one, but it's nothing like as dangerous as riding a bike without a helmet. I've seen a scooter rider smash their head against the side of a car, which graphically demonstrated why bike helmets are a good idea - if you hit something and go over the handlebars, there's every chance you'll hit something head first. Skiing a headfirst crash is less likely (though not impossible, people do hit trees and die). The celebrity woman (forgotten her name) who died from head injuries skiing basically just fell over and was very unlucky with the way she fell, you could do the same thing walking down the road.
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    Just been for my first week of skiing, I wore a helmet, as did about 70% of my class. Probably more like 30% of the people on the slopes though. My friend said that her mum got her ski caught on a chairlift once, and cracked her head open on a bar on the back, so they've always worn helmets since.

    I managed to hit myself in the head with one of my poles on the second day, which would've been a serious bump if I hadn't had a helmet. And I fell so hard on my head that I gave myself a concussion on my last day - I dread to think how bad it would've been if I hadn't had a helmet.
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    Helmets aren't yet as popular in Europe as they are in North America. Lots more boarders wear them than skiers, but the numbers are on the rise.

    I've never worn one myself, but am going to Canada in Jan for 3 months and will be wearing one out there.
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    I don't for skiing, but I've been skiing since I was tiny (wore one then) and I'm pretty good at staying upright. However I'd wear one for snowboarding, especially if it's your first time. Skiing on real slopes is totally different to indoor ones, lots more people and weather plays a huge factor.

    I've seen some pretty nasty snowboarding accidents so it's better to be safe and just wear the helmet.
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    (Original post by andmeaning)
    I don't for skiing, but I've been skiing since I was tiny (wore one then) and I'm pretty good at staying upright. However I'd wear one for snowboarding, especially if it's your first time. Skiing on real slopes is totally different to indoor ones, lots more people and weather plays a huge factor.

    I've seen some pretty nasty snowboarding accidents so it's better to be safe and just wear the helmet.
    Just because you can stay upright doesn't mean there aren't other people on the slopes who might knock you over...

    One year I got knocked over by someone but because the guy felt bad for knocking me over, as opposed to landing on top of me he lifted me above him (which was quite skilful!)
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    (Original post by greeneyedgirl)
    You don't think it's necessary?! Here are some facts:
    Depending on which study you look at helmets reduce brain injuries between 50-80%
    "In over 400 skiers and snowboarders with TBIs (traumatic brain injuries) serious enough to warrant transfer and admission to our level I trauma center, only five were wearing helmets. All five patients had mild injuries and made full recoveries despite some very major mechanisms. Our most severely injured helmeted patient to date was a snowboarder who went off a 40 foot cliff and landed on his head, cracking his helmet in half. He sustained a severe concussion (or mild diffuse axonal injury) with loss of consciousness, but had a negative CT scan of the head. He did require inpatient rehabilitation, but ultimately has made a full recovery and is now attending college. All the rest of the helmeted skiers and snowboarders had mild concussions and negative CT scans. Among the unhelmeted only 69% had simple concussions with negative CT scans of the head. The rest had more severe injuries such as cerebral contusions, or subdural, epidural or intracerebral hematomas. Severe TBI, with coma and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3-8, occurred in 15% of the unhelmeted skiers and snowboarders with head injuries, and their overall mortality rate after admission to the hospital was 4%."


    Also if you don't care about your health it is linked with skill levels too:
    According to the 2008/09 NSAA National Demographic Study: Helmet usage increases with ability level - 26% of beginners wore a helmet compared to 55% of advanced riders.
    first of all i never said i didnt think it was necessary, i just said i didnt bother and from what i remember never saw anyone else in one either, also when i went those few times it was through school and we were never offered one when we did the indoor and dry slope skiing/snowboarding. if it was offered i may have used one but never had the option and didnt really think about it. also when we went to italy it was never put on the list of equipment/ski wear stuff we had to buy so that is the reason i never wore one.
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    (Original post by vickie89)
    first of all i never said i didnt think it was necessary, i just said i didnt bother and from what i remember never saw anyone else in one either, also when i went those few times it was through school and we were never offered one when we did the indoor and dry slope skiing/snowboarding. if it was offered i may have used one but never had the option and didnt really think about it. also when we went to italy it was never put on the list of equipment/ski wear stuff we had to buy so that is the reason i never wore one.
    Actually if you read your first post you say "dont think its necessary", hence why I was simply presenting the reasons why it is in fact highly useful and protective. It's up to you if you wear one, but I felt your first post was suggesting that there was no gain out of wearing one.
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    (Original post by greeneyedgirl)
    Actually if you read your first post you say "dont think its necessary", hence why I was simply presenting the reasons why it is in fact highly useful and protective. It's up to you if you wear one, but I felt your first post was suggesting that there was no gain out of wearing one.
    sorry. not with it, i didnt mean to write that as i rewrote it as i was typing and didnt mean to leave that bit in (if you get what i mean).i just meant that its not necesarilly a requirement to wear a helmet whilst skiing, if that makes sense.
 
 
 
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