Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    im finding it really hard at the moment and was just wondering how others do it.
    how many textbooks do you use, are your lecture guides a good enough source, how to do research, what journals to use?

    thanks guys.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Very context dependent

    If you find a really super textbook you can basically just rely on that with the occasional extra reading. More often, you have to use multiple different textbooks. I like having a textbook like the Clarendon Series one which give a general and critical overview of an area helping me understand it, then I go to a more detailed textbook that would otherwise be extremely hard work if I didn't already have a broad understanding of the area. Sometimes this isn't possible and you just have to read different textbooks until you understand. It does depend.

    Generally its most efficient to read about the views of different writers in the more detailed textbooks and follow up footnotes/references if appropriate. Its sometimes worth doing searches on the Legal Journals Index on Westlaw if you are looking to prepare for an essay question on a particular topic and already have a good idea of what kind of views you are interested in, but usually general searches aren't efficient.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trimmy)
    im finding it really hard at the moment and was just wondering how others do it.
    how many textbooks do you use, are your lecture guides a good enough source, how to do research, what journals to use?

    thanks guys.
    On my law degree I used as many textbooks as I could get my hands on, preferably the more recent versions and I would also check the online updates if they had a companion website (usually advertised on the back of the book or in the first few pages.) I would take notes from each book as I read the relevant chapters and then at the end I would consolidate my notes, cutting out the repeated information. I would usually whittle all the key information down to between 2-4 sides of A4 for the exam, which I would memorise by rote.

    I'm currently doing the LPC and I watch the relevant lectures online and read the relevant lecture notes prior to my classes, taking notes. I then complete the activities for class and during class itself, I make notes of any key information. The tutor will usually say 'this is a key area' or 'this is on the exam' so I make a special note of that. After each class I consolidate all my notes-the notes I made prior to class and the notes I made during class, highlighting especially areas which have been singled out for the exam.

    In terms of research, on the law degree I mainly used textbooks and occasionally used online articles/cases from LexisNexis.

    On the LPC the vast majority of the information I need is contained within the lectures and the lecture notes. The only research I've ever had to do in the library is specifically for a legal research module in which case I use practitioners texts and Halsburys and so forth.

    I'm also making more use of the online resources now as I've been doing legal research tests so I have become more familiar with what they have to offer. If you Google 'LexisNexis online certificates in legal research', you can do tests online; providing you have access to LexisNexis which I imagine you will have.

    I did those tests when I was at uni and I found them really hard without tuition, I had to meet up with a LexisNexis representative on campus for guidance. Since I've started the LPC, though my email accounts, online tutorials have been advertised for tests in Lawtel and Westlaw. I've completed the basic tests for both and a combined advanced test. They are really good because you can take a tutorial online where a tutor speaks to you live and you can see her computer screen on your computer and she guides you through how to use them. At the end, you take a multiple choice test and receive a certificate through the post upon successful completion.

    Check your university email account regularly as that's where I learnt about these tutorials. It amazes me that even at LPC level, there are people who never check their email accounts.

    As a general rule of thumb, Westlaw is really good for journal articles and Lawtel is really good for the most up to date cases. You can also access certain practitioners texts online with Westlaw. I think you can with LexisNexis too but I hardly use LexisNexis anymore since becoming proficient in Westlaw and Lawtel.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iwwhty)
    On my law degree I used as many textbooks as I could get my hands on, preferably the more recent versions and I would also check the online updates if they had a companion website (usually advertised on the back of the book or in the first few pages.) I would take notes from each book as I read the relevant chapters and then at the end I would consolidate my notes, cutting out the repeated information. I would usually whittle all the key information down to between 2-4 sides of A4 for the exam, which I would memorise by rote.

    I'm currently doing the LPC and I watch the relevant lectures online and read the relevant lecture notes prior to my classes, taking notes. I then complete the activities for class and during class itself, I make notes of any key information. The tutor will usually say 'this is a key area' or 'this is on the exam' so I make a special note of that. After each class I consolidate all my notes-the notes I made prior to class and the notes I made during class, highlighting especially areas which have been singled out for the exam.

    In terms of research, on the law degree I mainly used textbooks and occasionally used online articles/cases from LexisNexis.

    On the LPC the vast majority of the information I need is contained within the lectures and the lecture notes. The only research I've ever had to do in the library is specifically for a legal research module in which case I use practitioners texts and Halsburys and so forth.

    I'm also making more use of the online resources now as I've been doing legal research tests so I have become more familiar with what they have to offer. If you Google 'LexisNexis online certificates in legal research', you can do tests online; providing you have access to LexisNexis which I imagine you will have.

    I did those tests when I was at uni and I found them really hard without tuition, I had to meet up with a LexisNexis representative on campus for guidance. Since I've started the LPC, though my email accounts, online tutorials have been advertised for tests in Lawtel and Westlaw. I've completed the basic tests for both and a combined advanced test. They are really good because you can take a tutorial online where a tutor speaks to you live and you can see her computer screen on your computer and she guides you through how to use them. At the end, you take a multiple choice test and receive a certificate through the post upon successful completion.

    Check your university email account regularly as that's where I learnt about these tutorials. It amazes me that even at LPC level, there are people who never check their email accounts.

    As a general rule of thumb, Westlaw is really good for journal articles and Lawtel is really good for the most up to date cases. You can also access certain practitioners texts online with Westlaw. I think you can with LexisNexis too but I hardly use LexisNexis anymore since becoming proficient in Westlaw and Lawtel.
    at the moment, im using one recommended textbook for the notes, which is also what my lecturer uses for lecture guides, then i have another detailed book and see bits for more detail. also this textbook has a lot of footnotes etc and further research, which i just subtract from it
    So, what did you get for your law degree? also whats the LPC like in terms of workload etc
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trimmy)
    at the moment, im using one recommended textbook for the notes, which is also what my lecturer uses for lecture guides, then i have another detailed book and see bits for more detail. also this textbook has a lot of footnotes etc and further research, which i just subtract from it
    So, what did you get for your law degree? also whats the LPC like in terms of workload etc
    I got a 2.1 in my degree. I'm finding the workload for the LPC pretty intense, there's a lot to cram in; I'll be glad when it's over.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iwwhty)
    I got a 2.1 in my degree. I'm finding the workload for the LPC pretty intense, there's a lot to cram in; I'll be glad when it's over.
    ohh cool was you near a 1st?
    ahhh i've heard that from the graduates i've been speaking to but did not want to believe it, so have you got a training contract? if so with what firm? thats if your willing to tell.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by trimmy)
    ohh cool was you near a 1st?
    ahhh i've heard that from the graduates i've been speaking to but did not want to believe it, so have you got a training contract? if so with what firm? thats if your willing to tell.
    Nowhere near haha, I got a low 2.1. I haven't got a training contract, I haven't even been applying, been up to my eyeballs in work. I want to work for a high street firm though and I don't mind working as a paralegal first to get my foot in the door.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What newspaper do you read/prefer?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.