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    I'm not a psychology student but I've been asked to evaluate the current literature regarding one psychosocial behaviour that predisposes someone to a cardiac event (MI, Heart Attack, etc).

    I'm not even sure what a psychosocial behaviour is.

    At first I thought it was unhealthy lifestyle behaviours like smoking cessation, poor diet, taking drugs etc. But on second thoughts I'm not so sure if I'm on the right line with that. Perhaps it's general or perceived stress, or something else?

    Could somebody please give us some pointers.
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    Psychosocial is a word that touches on two arenas as you can probably tell: social influences and psychological influences.

    Social influences can include family background, upbringing, education, income, employment. That kind of thing.

    Psychological factors can include things like perceived vulnerability, self efficacy, anxiety barriers, motivation, perceived risk and cost, and cues to action.

    Take a look at the literature of health psychology. In particular things like the health belief model, theory of planned behaviour and the protection motivation theory.

    Any health psych textbook will take you through the components and a assumptions of these models which incorporate psychosocial factors.
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    Thanks for your response GodspeedGehenna.

    I understand what you mean about psychological factors and social influences now. I've had a read over the health psychology theoires that you mentioned but to be honest I'm still a little unsure on what rute to take.

    Family background does this relate to family history such as another person in your family having a heart attack and putting you at greater risk of having one or do you mean ethnic minority.

    Self efficacy and motivation were the two which I thought would be good to start with but after a brief look at current literature I'm less convinced.

    Social Anxiety and/or Anxiety looks interesting and has some current up to date literature. I think this one is the win for me. Would this be appropriate for my essay?

    Would Social Anxiety and Anxiety be classed as two asecpts of psycho-social behaviour as in different behaviours or just classed as one asecpt? - The reason I ask is because I have to look at one asecpt but I know that social introversion is a measurement of anxiety

    Thanks again, appreciate it.
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    (Original post by Different Cloud)
    Thanks for your response GodspeedGehenna.

    I understand what you mean about psychological factors and social influences now. I've had a read over the health psychology theoires that you mentioned but to be honest I'm still a little unsure on what rute to take.

    Family background does this relate to family history such as another person in your family having a heart attack and putting you at greater risk of having one or do you mean ethnic minority.

    Self efficacy and motivation were the two which I thought would be good to start with but after a brief look at current literature I'm less convinced.

    Social Anxiety and/or Anxiety looks interesting and has some current up to date literature. I think this one is the win for me. Would this be appropriate for my essay?

    Would Social Anxiety and Anxiety be classed as two asecpts of psycho-social behaviour as in different behaviours or just classed as one asecpt? - The reason I ask is because I have to look at one asecpt but I know that social introversion is a measurement of anxiety

    Thanks again, appreciate it.
    When I say family background I mean things like socioeconomic status, level of education etc.

    If you're looking at MI risk, I would imagine one of the major interventions would be dietary changes. There should be significant literature about this particularly in regards to self efficacy, perceived vulnerability and such. If you have a search, you should easily find papers applying these models to behaviours like dietary change and maintenance.

    Take the HB model for example, which basically describes a cost benefit relationship which determines the likelihood for a behaviour to be adopted. Included in this calculation are psychological factors I have previously mentioned. So, for example, if a person perceives the risk of MI as being high and the costs of changing their diet as being low, they would be more likely to adopt the dietary change. There will be empirical papers that have tested this idea which will allow you to evaluate how successful the model is at predicting health behaviours. In addition, it also offers targets for intervention, e.g. In this case by increasing perceived vulnerability through education.

    Hope that helps.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    If you're looking at MI risk, I would imagine one of the major interventions would be dietary changes. There should be significant literature about this particularly in regards to self efficacy, perceived vulnerability and such. If you have a search, you should easily find papers applying these models to behaviours like dietary change and maintenance.

    Take the HB model for example, which basically describes a cost benefit relationship which determines the likelihood for a behaviour to be adopted. Included in this calculation are psychological factors I have previously mentioned. So, for example, if a person perceives the risk of MI as being high and the costs of changing their diet as being low, they would be more likely to adopt the dietary change. There will be empirical papers that have tested this idea which will allow you to evaluate how successful the model is at predicting health behaviours. In addition, it also offers targets for intervention, e.g. In this case by increasing perceived vulnerability through education.
    I see what you mean but I am not looking at the prevention or lowering of the risk. I'm looking at one aspect of psychosocial behaviour and evaluating how that behaviour predisposes individuals to a cardiac event.

    For example. Type A personality and an off-the-charts hostility level may be courting a heart attack. Anxiety also is considered to markedly increases the risk of heart attack. Thus, I thought Anxiety, Depression or Aggression as the aspect of psychosocial behaviour to evaluate.

    As you say the HB model determines the likelihood for a behaviour to be adopted. Does an Impact of Self-Efficacy predispose, influence or increase the risk of an MI? Well if they would be more likely to adopt the dietary change then no, but If they aren't then yes. ''Despite considerable clinical interest, attempts to link perceived self-efficacy with successful weight control have had mixed success (REF).''
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    On second thoughts. Social Anxiety, Anxiety or Depression aren't really Psychological factors or Psycho-social Behaviours are they? Would I be correct in saying this and that they are disorders?.

    Which the question isn't asking me. The wuestion is about one aspect of psycho-social behaviour.

    Thus, in that case I would be aswell looking at self-efficacy as you say.

    In particular a low sense of self-efficacy which is associated with depression, anxiety, and helplessness. Looking at Physical Exercise and Nutrition / Weight Control - As not taking action in these areas will predispose you to a cardiac event.

    Thoughts?
 
 
 
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