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Anyone esle feel they missed out becuase of where their parents chose to live? Watch

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    Does anyone esle ever feel like this. I often feel like i ahve missed out so many opputunities as teenager, (mainly really little things) that my friends have done cos my parents chose to live in the arse end of nowhere with **** public transport and they hardly ever took me anywhere. The one that comes up most often is ice skating (see like i said really little thing). I have always liked the idea of ice skating and a few of my friends do it and are good at it, but i never ever got to do it and now i feel like i'm too old to learn. I went to my first ice hockey game for my boyfriend birthday and found myself feeling incredibly jealous of these players not becsaue i am remotely interested in laying ice hockey but simple cos they are on the ice and had the oppurtunity to become good at ice skating. This is just one of many hobbies and activities that i feel i have missed out on in my life. Does anyone else feel like this?
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    Erm. I think I may have felt this a couple of times, yeah.

    Mostly when I got to college and realised how nice many of the people from the other side of town were (so they went to different secondary schools and stuff) compared to the ********s from my school/area.
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    Not at all. I grew up in a little village in Lincolnshire. I spent most of my childhood and teenage years in some kind of field. The little pub just out of the village used to serve us from when we were 13 so we used to just get drunk and sleep in a field. I had an amazing time, but I now realise I was very sheltered. I love my music and I went to a few gigs when I could get a train to Nottingham. I hadn't even had an Indian takeaway before I went to uni, there wasn't one near us. Lol.

    I'm now living in Bristol and I love being a city kid. There's always something going on, gigs all the time, random street parties and ****. I can see how growing up somewhere like here would have made me a completely different person. But I don't regret it at all. I think my parents made a fantastic decision to move to the country and that we had a great childhood as a result. :cool:
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    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    I think you missed out on spelling lessons too from the looks of it.
    I'm dyslexic and type too fast for my brain to keep up and sometimes get letters the wrong way round and miss out words. Sorry.
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    Yup. I grew up in an area full of old people.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm dyslexic and type too fast for my brain to keep up and sometimes get letters the wrong way round and miss out words. Sorry.
    Don't apologise, your post was perfectly understandable, that poster is not your English teacher.
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    Yes. Nothing to be done about it now though, so whatever.
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    No, I love my town. Lovely place, very historical, lots of pubs, a rich cultural life, a field/wood at the end of the road for tomboyish activities such as climbing trees and playing frisbee, and it's close to London.
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    Nope. My childhood was OK (quiet but safe) but I never took advantage of any of the "opportunites" that the city centre offered. I've spent the vast majority of my time in the suburb where I live, so despite living in a city, I think I'm quite sheltered.

    I do look forward to travelling though, my city (not saying which one it is) is generally seen as not the most pleasant of places to live (not because of crime as such, it's just quite grotty and miserable) so I want to visit a "nice" city and see what it and its people are like. I do realize there are ********s everywhere you go though.
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    hmmm yeh sometimes. I grew up in the middle of nowhere, tiny country village, very English I suppose. But my mother and father both grew up in large cities (one in a megacity) so for them it was probably a nice change.

    I had a pleasant and safe childhood; I wouldn't exchange it for growing up somewhere like Peckham, for example, or London in general. You see tiny school kids (really, really young kids) wandering around the place, getting on buses alone in London. How sad. Also I had the best education anyone could wish for in a very traditional public school, which I don't think one could have if one lived somewhere like south east London.
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    a) the majority of people in this country, let alone the world, do not have easy access to an ice skating rink
    b) you can't be "too old to learn" because you are probably only like 1/4 of the way through your life
    c) ice skating is pretty easy to learn anyway, with lots of practice you could become very good within the space of a couple of years
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I'm dyslexic and type too fast for my brain to keep up and sometimes get letters the wrong way round and miss out words. Sorry.
    Dont apologise- that guy was just being a douche.

    If i grew up somewhere else i know things could have been a lot better
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    Kind of. I lived in Mayfair for quite a while during primary school so got used to the Central London lifestyle, so it kind of sucks that I've spent my teenage years in leafy suburban Surrey. It's not THAT bad, and Westfield (my favourite London destination since it opened) is only half an hour away or so, but still.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Does anyone esle ever feel like this. I often feel like i ahve missed out so many opputunities as teenager, (mainly really little things) that my friends have done cos my parents chose to live in the arse end of nowhere with **** public transport and they hardly ever took me anywhere. The one that comes up most often is ice skating (see like i said really little thing). I have always liked the idea of ice skating and a few of my friends do it and are good at it, but i never ever got to do it and now i feel like i'm too old to learn. I went to my first ice hockey game for my boyfriend birthday and found myself feeling incredibly jealous of these players not becsaue i am remotely interested in laying ice hockey but simple cos they are on the ice and had the oppurtunity to become good at ice skating. This is just one of many hobbies and activities that i feel i have missed out on in my life. Does anyone else feel like this?
    I guess.

    I never had the typical teenage life of spending a lot of time with friends. I went to a rural school so I'd have friends that lived 5 or 10 miles away. Doesn't seem far I know but when you think of a typical comp in a town, you'd imagine most of the students would be from the town itself or surrounding villages, instead, my comp was in a village and had a catchment area of about :rolleyes:

    We also lived in a rural place, meaning it was pretty hard to see friends without an hours worth of travelling. Unfortunate, but I guess that's the way it goes. I can see the benefits of living in a rural area if you have a car, but it will probably have a detrimental effect on your family.

    Ah well, I'll make up for it at university.
 
 
 
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