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    May I ask usually which year will we learn about game theory? thx
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      We've done it every year so far. We did some basic stuff in first year (prisoner's dilemma) micro.
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      It's usually introduced as part of 'intermediate' microeconomics, which means it comes in 1st and 2nd year, you will do prisoners dilemma, Nash equilibria for pure/mixed strategies etc. Then at some unis you will be able to do a separate module in 3rd year on Game Theory and Strategic Behaviour. The reason it is only briefly introduced in the first two years is usually you have 10/11 weeks a semester (or 8 I think at Oxbridge) so when it's part of a micro course you can only spend 1 or 2 weeks on it. To really get into it you need a full module. But a basic idea is necessary for any kind of strategic behaviour, eg when you start to talk about oligopoly markets, students need to have done a bit of game theory to look at stuff like Cournot/Stackelberg/Bertrand equilibrium or when it pays for an incumbent to invest to bar entry etc

      I think if you're thinking pre-uni then its quite easy to read some introductory game theory then get the Thinking Strategically book which has a lot of examples of game theory in real life (more worthwhile reading than Freakonomics). Sport, business, relationships, foreign policy are all based on game theory.
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      (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
      It's usually introduced as part of 'intermediate' microeconomics, which means it comes in 1st and 2nd year, you will do prisoners dilemma, Nash equilibria for pure/mixed strategies etc. Then at some unis you will be able to do a separate module in 3rd year on Game Theory and Strategic Behaviour. The reason it is only briefly introduced in the first two years is usually you have 10/11 weeks a semester (or 8 I think at Oxbridge) so when it's part of a micro course you can only spend 1 or 2 weeks on it. To really get into it you need a full module. But a basic idea is necessary for any kind of strategic behaviour, eg when you start to talk about oligopoly markets, students need to have done a bit of game theory to look at stuff like Cournot/Stackelberg/Bertrand equilibrium or when it pays for an incumbent to invest to bar entry etc.
      We did this in our second year general micro course. Surely some other unis must too? Or did you mean they do micro in one term, and game theory in another term but sit two separate exams? Which we essentially did except it was called micro II the entire module and sat 1 exam.

      But I agree about the rest, you can do strategic interaction in a lot of things, like my friend does industrial and it uses it heavily. Or we have a module about economics applications and it looks basically like game theory (both in third year btw).
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      We covered it a bit in our first year and we've done a bit more now in our second year, but we've a third year module dedicated to it. Otherwise the second-year module Industrial Economics makes good use of game theory.

      So to answer your question, you'll more than likely touch upon it in each and every year, but to varying degrees of depth.
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      (Original post by danny111)
      We did this in our second year general micro course. Surely some other unis must too? Or did you mean they do micro in one term, and game theory in another term but sit two separate exams? Which we essentially did except it was called micro II the entire module and sat 1 exam.

      But I agree about the rest, you can do strategic interaction in a lot of things, like my friend does industrial and it uses it heavily. Or we have a module about economics applications and it looks basically like game theory (both in third year btw).
      What I meant was that game theory will be covered on any intermediate micro course but you only have time to spend a couple of weeks on it, I think 2nd year is about the level like you say. So pretty much all students who have done 2nd year micro will have done that kind of basic game theory, but if you want to take it further you would have to a specialist module. In our exams game theory would come up disguised in other topics eg there'd be something about rival firms investing under uncertainty but the question would actually involve two time periods so intertemporal choice as well and you would need to do a decision tree to show the Nash equilibrium outcome. Or there would be a question about externalities asking you to use the Coase theorem to derive the socially optimal level of output by a pollution producing firm, and you'd need to draw payoff matrices for the outcome with no property rights, polluter owning property rights or victim owning property rights.

      I liked Game Theory but there were other things I wanted to study so I didn't have room to do a specialist module in it, but I think if I could go back to uni again I would do some more game theory. I know when you do more advanced game theory it gets pretty tricky so you need to be confident in maths.

      I reckon a PhD in something game theory related would make you very employable to consultancies because they are very micro-oriented.
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      Thanks a lot for the replys.
      So if I want to further study in game theory in Msc, a maths degree is more preferred than an econ one?

      Edited: Is their any recommendation for a starter in game theory? thankss
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        (Original post by YhA_kaede)
        Thanks a lot for the replys.
        So if I want to further study in game theory in Msc, a maths degree is more preferred than an econ one?

        Edited: Is their any recommendation for a starter in game theory? thankss
        How about Thinking Strategically by Dixit and Nalebuff?: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Thinking-Str...2754127&sr=1-1
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        Yes Thinking Strategically is the book to read as a starter. You can pick up some basic textbook theory on Game Theory from any undergrad econ textbook, so good to read them in conjunction.

        I wouldn't say a maths degree was preferred to an econ one for doing the type of game theory you do in Economics at MSc, they will insist you do a Graduate Diploma first if you come in with a Maths degree. But if its game theory which you really want to do, and not so much the other aspects of economics, then you can specialise in this through maths, game theory is a branch of mathematics, so you wouldn't need to study economics at all other than I am sure there is some crossover when it is put in an applied context in maths.
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        Game Theory and Economic Modelling (Clarendon Lectures in Economics)
        http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0...SIN=0198283814 <-- have anyone read this one before? My friend introduce it to me and I am considering between this n Thinking Strategically.

        Which one is more recommended? thankss
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        Games Of Strategy by Dixit, Riley and Skeath is also a good beginners book.
       
       
       
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