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    Hi,

    Based on what I read around, is it true that universities look at solely yr undergraduate results in order to determine if you can progress to a Meng programme?

    If it is true, then why are there different entry req for Beng and Meng based on A level results, when the uni needs to do another selection that is final at the end of 2nd yr? Shouldn't the A level entry req be the same?

    Btw, let say if I can't decide between Beng and Meng, should I put Beng as my choice in ucas app?

    Thanks
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    I can't fully answer your question, but it's easier for English and Welsh students to get their final year funding cut if they're dropping down to the BEng than it is for them to get an extra year's funding for the MEng.

    But that only applies to English and Welsh students. I see you're from Singapore and thus you'll probably be paying the full whack (international fees) out of your own pocket. If you know that a career in engineering is for you then I'd apply to the MEng straight away.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    I can't fully answer your question, but it's easier for English and Welsh students to get their final year funding cut if they're dropping down to the BEng than it is for them to get an extra year's funding for the MEng.

    But that only applies to English and Welsh students. I see you're from Singapore and thus you'll probably be paying the full whack (international fees) out of your own pocket. If you know that a career in engineering is for you then I'd apply to the MEng straight away.
    your forgetting about the rts students who wont have the QRRP and IB Quals... that's so naive of you.
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    It tends to be because the M...courses require higher overall effort(ie staying above a particular grade throughout your course) thus (in general) obtaining higher A level grades indicates the student is more likely to achieve that.

    The uni will remove someone from that course though if their grades drop and there's almost always the chance to go onto the M...if your grades are good.

    I would say if you are interested in M...apply for it, chances are if you get an offer and fail it, you'll get put on the B course and still have the chance to move up.

    It's exactly what I did with MSci and BSc.
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    (Original post by superkinetic)
    Hi,

    Based on what I read around, is it true that universities look at solely yr undergraduate results in order to determine if you can progress to a Meng programme?

    If it is true, then why are there different entry req for Beng and Meng based on A level results, when the uni needs to do another selection that is final at the end of 2nd yr? Shouldn't the A level entry req be the same?

    Btw, let say if I can't decide between Beng and Meng, should I put Beng as my choice in ucas app?

    Thanks
    I can tell you how it works with physics, and I suspect its similar in Engineering.

    There are two ways of getting a Masters:

    Doing a bachelors (BSc), then reapplying and doing an MSc, possibly at another university. You will probably not find it easy to get funding for your masters.

    Going straight to an undergrad masters (MPhys, MEng etc). You get funded all the way through for this. Think of this as a fast-track system for people who know they want to be professionals in this field and actually have the ability to do it.

    For obvious reasons only the smarter people are allowed onto the fast-track course - this might mean you need slightly better A-level results, and/or it might mean you need to average a 2:1 in your 1st 2 years to maintain eligibility.

    If you manage to meet the criteria for the undergrad masters pathway, you should apply for it: because you can always change your mind and switch to a BSc, but you cannot switch the other way because the funding for the extra year will not have been assigned for you.
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I can tell you how it works with physics, and I suspect its similar in Engineering.

    There are two ways of getting a Masters:

    Doing a bachelors (BSc), then reapplying and doing an MSc, possibly at another university. You will probably not find it easy to get funding for your masters.

    Going straight to an undergrad masters (MPhys, MEng etc). You get funded all the way through for this. Think of this as a fast-track system for people who know they want to be professionals in this field and actually have the ability to do it.

    For obvious reasons only the smarter people are allowed onto the fast-track course - this might mean you need slightly better A-level results, and/or it might mean you need to average a 2:1 in your 1st 2 years to maintain eligibility.

    If you manage to meet the criteria for the undergrad masters pathway, you should apply for it: because you can always change your mind and switch to a BSc, but you cannot switch the other way because the funding for the extra year will not have been assigned for you.
    That's not true, I can still switch to undergrad masters and my friend who's doing theoretical physics has recently switched to undergrad masters.
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    (Original post by nicatre)
    That's not true, I can still switch to undergrad masters and my friend who's doing theoretical physics has recently switched to undergrad masters.

    They probably actually registered you as an MPhys student when you first applied. Several universities who don't have different initial UCAS acceptance criteria for the two degree courses simply register all their students as MPhys's, and only change you to a BSc in your second year when you either don't get the grades or don't express the desire to do the extra year. That way they avoid the issue of people being gutted that they can't swap. Not every university does this however, so its always better to be safe than sorry and apply for the MPhys.
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    (Original post by Valh)
    I have applied for a Bsc at a university with higher requirements for the Msci and they said that I could switch after the first year, provided I got good test results. Do you think this is unlikely to be true? It's my first choice university and I am starting to think I would like to switch to the Msci...
    Well if they definitely said that you can switch then I would trust them, they probably know what they're doing. It probably wouldn't hurt to check with them I suppose, just let them know that you're interested in the MSc option. (Are you sure its an MSc and not an M something else?)


    When you saiy "higher requirements", do you mean - for example - AAB for masters compared to ABB for batchelors? It doesn't make much sense for them to stipulate that and then let you switch anyway even if you didn't get AAB. :confused:
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    (Original post by air-ninety-one)
    your forgetting about the rts students who wont have the QRRP and IB Quals... that's so naive of you.
    What the **** are you on about?
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    For my course (Aero Eng), the entry requirements are higher for the MEng than the BEng, however the first two years are identical and if you achieve over 55% average from the first two years then you can switch from the BEng to the MEng. Likewise, if you're on the MEng you may be asked to move down if you do not achieve 55%.
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    (Original post by Valh)
    Well it's an MChem, but it's still an undergrad masters.



    Yes, those are the requirements, but they said if you get 60%+ in the first year, you will be offered the oppurtunity to switch.

    I do believe what they said to me before, but I think I will double check with them and ask them via email, before I firm it.
    OK right, MChem. It's actually not completely equivalent to an MSc you know, an undergrad masters is between a bachelors and a postgrad masters.

    I can believe that they do ask for different criteria, but it is entirely illogical. In my old physics department we simply filled in a form at the end of our 2nd year and if we got over 55% we were allowed to stay on the MPhys course and everyone else was changed to the BSc. It seems much simpler that way.


    But to the OP: unless they specifically tell you that you can swap up, then apply for the masters just to keep your options open.
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      (Original post by superkinetic)
      Hi,

      Based on what I read around, is it true that universities look at solely yr undergraduate results in order to determine if you can progress to a Meng programme?

      If it is true, then why are there different entry req for Beng and Meng based on A level results, when the uni needs to do another selection that is final at the end of 2nd yr? Shouldn't the A level entry req be the same?

      Btw, let say if I can't decide between Beng and Meng, should I put Beng as my choice in ucas app?

      Thanks
      Like the rest of the people said, Meng is more demanding, that is why you need better A Levels. In my university if you were originally accepted for a Beng you could opt for Meng during the first two years provided that in your second year you had an average mark of 60% and passed all your 2nd year modules at first attempt(the same rules applied to the people that had been accepted for an Meng from the start). The only problem that you will encounter with the conversion from Beng to MEng is that the SLC company will make your life difficult before giving you an extra year of maintenance loans and grants if you have originally told them that your degree was three years long and not four (I am talking from experience, at least that was the case a few years ago).
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      (Original post by Smack)
      What the **** are you on about?
      :confused: im obviously talking about rainbows.... whats happened to this forum? (scottish people)
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      Thanks everyone for yr input!

      (Original post by Valh)
      I have applied for a Bsc at a university with higher requirements for the Msci and they said that I could switch after the first year, provided I got good test results. Do you think this is unlikely to be true? It's my first choice university and I am starting to think I would like to switch to the Msci...
      Hi Valh, same too, I've applied for material eng in unis with higher req for Meng and one of the uni, imperial, also claimed that we could switch from Beng to Meng, since the key factor to be admitted is based on good 1st and 2nd yr results. In that case, I think it's an oxymoron to set higher entry req when ultimately, admission is based on uni performance, regardless of yr A level results. Perhaps I think they should just remove those undergrad master options in ucas!

      (Original post by py0alb)
      I can tell you how it works with physics, and I suspect its similar in Engineering.

      There are two ways of getting a Masters:

      Doing a bachelors (BSc), then reapplying and doing an MSc, possibly at another university. You will probably not find it easy to get funding for your masters.

      Going straight to an undergrad masters (MPhys, MEng etc). You get funded all the way through for this. Think of this as a fast-track system for people who know they want to be professionals in this field and actually have the ability to do it.

      For obvious reasons only the smarter people are allowed onto the fast-track course - this might mean you need slightly better A-level results, and/or it might mean you need to average a 2:1 in your 1st 2 years to maintain eligibility.

      If you manage to meet the criteria for the undergrad masters pathway, you should apply for it: because you can always change your mind and switch to a BSc, but you cannot switch the other way because the funding for the extra year will not have been assigned for you.
      I didn't know they fund students admitted straight to undergrad masters. But it doesn't apply to international students right?
     
     
     
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