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Is a Universities reputation really as important as people make out? Watch

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    Basically, this thread is a bit presumptious on whether i receive an offer from Bristol, as I have done with Newcastle and Leeds.

    My query is basically that having visited Newcastle and Leeds, I absolutely loved both of them, Newcastle in particular, but i know that in terms of the universities reputations, they aren't as good as Bristol. The reputation of a uni is often made out to be very important for future prosperity in terms of jobs, but is this really true?

    If i were to turn down Bristol for Newcastle or Leeds, would this really be a big mistake with regard to how the degree is rated by employers?

    Thanks.
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    People on here will argue that reputation means nearly everything, but it really doesn't. At the end of the day, you're all getting near enough the same degree, but of course some universities will be seen as above some others (Such as Oxbridge). Universities which are "renown" for their department in, for example, history (Such as Oxford, Durham) might attract employers a bit more but if someone has a First from Teesside against someone with a 2:2 from Oxford, it's not always the case of "You went to Oxford, you obviously must be amazing."

    Depends on how much work you put in. Take advantage of societies, groups, (To an extent people :P) and make the most of it. It all depends on where you think you'll flourish best, but if you'd feel more comfortable and as if you'd do better at a "high" university, then by all means go. If you get a First then you'll be pretty much equally regarded by employers compared to someone else with a First (unless, like I keep saying, it's Oxbridge.)

    Personally, if you love Newcastle or Leeds and you choose Bristol because it's seen as "better" you'd be making a huge mistake in my opinion. University isn't all about getting a degree, go somewhere you'll enjoy.
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    On an added note, university league tables change every year. You could go to SOAS as it was in the top 10 in the first year, but the time you leave it could have gone down to 40th. If your choices are 10 places apart, employers aren't going to say "Sorry mate, I have this other applicant who went to Kent and as you can see, it's one place above your university. He may not have the same amount of work experience as you but he got the same degree class so, bad luck."

    (Don't mean to pick on Kent, it's actually one of my first choices for History ^^)
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    (Original post by Xhotas)
    People on here will argue that reputation means nearly everything, but it really doesn't. At the end of the day, you're all getting near enough the same degree, but of course some universities will be seen as above some others (Such as Oxbridge). Universities which are "renown" for their department in, for example, history (Such as Oxford, Durham) might attract employers a bit more but if someone has a First from Teesside against someone with a 2:2 from Oxford, it's not always the case of "You went to Oxford, you obviously must be amazing."

    Depends on how much work you put in. Take advantage of societies, groups, (To an extent people :P) and make the most of it. It all depends on where you think you'll flourish best, but if you'd feel more comfortable and as if you'd do better at a "high" university, then by all means go. If you get a First then you'll be pretty much equally regarded by employers compared to someone else with a First (unless, like I keep saying, it's Oxbridge.)

    Personally, if you love Newcastle or Leeds and you choose Bristol because it's seen as "better" you'd be making a huge mistake in my opinion. University isn't all about getting a degree, go somewhere you'll enjoy.
    To be honest, couldnt agree much more with everything you just said haha, plus, in terms of reputation, as far as I'm aware the difference between Bristol and Newcastle and Leeds is quite minor
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    I think I was faced with a similar dilemma before starting my degree. In my own experience, I think reputation is overblown by a lot of students. Obviously there are the top universities which have well-deserved reputation but outside of them, it doesn't really matter.

    However, one thing which I have noticed is that some universities tend to attract better firms and chambers to their networking events. For example, at my university law fair there were no magic circle firms which was a little annoying.
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    Reputation means a lot at the top, not so much at the middle and a lot at the bottom.
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      No, but good grammar is.
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      (Original post by Xhotas)
      People on here will argue that reputation means nearly everything, but it really doesn't. At the end of the day, you're all getting near enough the same degree, but of course some universities will be seen as above some others (Such as Oxbridge). Universities which are "renown" for their department in, for example, history (Such as Oxford, Durham) might attract employers a bit more but if someone has a First from Teesside against someone with a 2:2 from Oxford, it's not always the case of "You went to Oxford, you obviously must be amazing."

      Depends on how much work you put in. Take advantage of societies, groups, (To an extent people :P) and make the most of it. It all depends on where you think you'll flourish best, but if you'd feel more comfortable and as if you'd do better at a "high" university, then by all means go. If you get a First then you'll be pretty much equally regarded by employers compared to someone else with a First (unless, like I keep saying, it's Oxbridge.)

      Personally, if you love Newcastle or Leeds and you choose Bristol because it's seen as "better" you'd be making a huge mistake in my opinion. University isn't all about getting a degree, go somewhere you'll enjoy.
      Agreed
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      There's no point saying that it never matters to anyone, because some employers do take it into consideration, however there is so much else to take into account as well; for example what classification you end up achieving, your work experience, references, interview techniques.. etc.
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      It is taken into consideration. But is overblown by the snobs here who think that because they're going to Oxford they will walk into any job.

      If you go to a middling uni and get a first, you will have just as good a chance as anyone especially if the course you do offers a years work exp
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      Depends on the course really. For law, any uni which is mid ranked or higher will give you equal experience and it won't make much of a difference. However, for the sciences reputation is important.
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      (Original post by Xhotas)
      People on here will argue that reputation means nearly everything, but it really doesn't. At the end of the day, you're all getting near enough the same degree, but of course some universities will be seen as above some others (Such as Oxbridge). Universities which are "renown" for their department in, for example, history (Such as Oxford, Durham) might attract employers a bit more but if someone has a First from Teesside against someone with a 2:2 from Oxford, it's not always the case of "You went to Oxford, you obviously must be amazing."

      Depends on how much work you put in. Take advantage of societies, groups, (To an extent people :P) and make the most of it. It all depends on where you think you'll flourish best, but if you'd feel more comfortable and as if you'd do better at a "high" university, then by all means go. If you get a First then you'll be pretty much equally regarded by employers compared to someone else with a First (unless, like I keep saying, it's Oxbridge.)

      Personally, if you love Newcastle or Leeds and you choose Bristol because it's seen as "better" you'd be making a huge mistake in my opinion. University isn't all about getting a degree, go somewhere you'll enjoy.
      Not always, but isn't sometimes enough for reputation to make a difference? My dad has a 2.2 from Oxford and has been explicitly told by interviewers that he got the interview because he went to oxford. Reaputation is worth more than you would like to think.
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      Some Unis aren't even on the rep list but have some of the best courses for specific subjects and have strong industry ties. You go to the one that offers the best course not the highest rep.
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      As long as you're not comparing, for example, UCL and TVU, then I wouldn't place too much weight on perceived reputation. At the end of the day, it's not going to make a great deal of difference. Though if it's important to YOU then obviously go for the one you consider the most prestigious, otherwise pick the one you'll be happiest at.
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      For the jobs where prestige is important and/or headhunting is prevalent (Law, IB, journalism etc.) then reputation will mean something, but for the vast majority of graduate careers it doesn't mean much at all.
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      It matters a very great deal for the sort of jobs where it matters. If your intended career is very qualification dependent eg. medicine then the course quality is vital. If your intended career is not qualification dependent eg. FCO then the prestige of the uni is vital. If your intended career path is unusual eg. entrepreneurial then don't go to uni at all - spend the £27k you save by skipping uni on starting the business. Win or lose you will learn more than you would have at uni.
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      An university's reputation is often based on research matters, so as long as you aren't doing post-grad research, it should not bother you.

      As for me, studying has been one of the best things in my life, and I am at a rather "bad" university. You should base your decision on your own personal preferences, for your time in university should be a great experience. You won't profit from studying at one of the best universities if you don't enjoy it.
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      I think it depends on what type of job one wants after graduation. If someone wants to just go into law and doesn't care about which firm, then no it doesn't matter.

      If someone wants to go into a MC then it is going to have some weight. I think the general groupings matter more than specifics (i.e when people say, Bristol is ranked X spots above Warwick and therefore it is infinitely better). 65% of magic circle recruits attended an institution classified by The Times as a top 10 university (legal week). On the other hand, only 11.7% of magic circle trainees attended a university ranked below 20 in the UK (legal week). So you definitely don't loose out by attending a post 92, but your chances are statistically higher by attending a top 10. With that in mind, I don't think a uni ranking #4 gives someone a better shot than a uni ranking #5 at an MC. Although I do think a uni ranking #4 gives someone a better shot than a uni ranking #55, all things being equal.
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      (Original post by Bobifier)
      Not always, but isn't sometimes enough for reputation to make a difference? My dad has a 2.2 from Oxford and has been explicitly told by interviewers that he got the interview because he went to oxford. Reaputation is worth more than you would like to think.
      I am inclined to agree with this. I'd rather go to Oxford and graduate with a 2.2, than go to London Met and graduate with a 2.1.
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      Thanks for all your replies. I am personaly not sure what I want to do after university but it will certainly be something that requires a degree, and in view of this, if i were to choose Newcastle over Bristol, from what the majority of you say, this wouldnt be such a bad thing? Am i right in saying this?
     
     
     
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