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    Who has read this? I figure I should probably read it at some point in my life but I'm a bit scared to...
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    (Original post by IPlayThePiccolo)
    Who has read this? I figure I should probably read it at some point in my life but I'm a bit scared to...
    Leo Tolstoy is more readable than you would imagine, and most good translations usually list the significant characters at the beginning to help you remember who is who. Tolstoy usually chunks his work into sections and books so it is probably best to stick to these; try and finish a book a day and you will be fine.
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    TL;DR
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    I have, years ago. Worth it, its a good read, but I wouldn't want to do it again unless I could devote my time to it, I don't think its really the sort of book to read say, a few pages here and there.
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    (Original post by IPlayThePiccolo)
    Who has read this? I figure I should probably read it at some point in my life but I'm a bit scared to...
    Why scared? As evantej said, get a good translation and it's an easy read.
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    I have, I suggest getting a copy of a Pevear and Volokhonsky translation, it certainly took me a while but it was worth it; an enjoyable and rewarding read.
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    I'm going to start reading it after my Jan exam
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    It is an enduring read so I recommend you read it during the summer or any other holiday where you won't be easily disturbed. Coming back to it, 30 pages at a time or so, is really not worth it. Find a comfortable chair, a drink, a bookmark for the dramatis personae and you are set. I'm currently reading Anna Karenin which (imo) is the more difficult book. Especially when it comes to remembering the names.

    E.g, Princess Dárya Alexandrovna ---- > Dolly, Dásha, Dáshenka, Dollenka, etc. Every character has more than two nicknames so it gets confusing. :nothing:
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    It is apparently very good. I've not yet read it myself but will get to it in time.
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    I read it over the summer. I have to admit that I started it mostly so that I could say I had, but it's actually really enjoyable once you get into it, I'd have to repeat what others have said, it's a book you really have to tackle head on, and read in one go. It is quite interesting to see how the (numerous ) characters intertwine.
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    I'm going through a weird Russian literature phase so I have Crime and Punishment (already read), War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Get the Vintage copy (the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation) because it has a lovely front cover!! Oh, and it's a good translation...
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    (Original post by Lovefoxxx_93)
    I'm going through a weird Russian literature phase so I have Crime and Punishment (already read), War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Get the Vintage copy (the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation) because it has a lovely front cover!! Oh, and it's a good translation...
    How did you like the others, especially Crime and Punishment?
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    (Original post by evantej)
    How did you like the others, especially Crime and Punishment?
    I thought it was pretty good: it wasn't as difficult as I first expected. I found there were some pages that were a bit dull, especially if a character had launched into a rambling monologue, and tried really hard not to skip them. Overall, I would recommend it.
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    I really loved the Peace bits, not so keen on the War bits. But it's worth a read if you're interested in Russian history and literature. Personally, I preferred Anna Karenina.
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    I'm quite in to Russian literature at the moment. Read Dostoyevsky's Brothers Karamazov and Crime and Punishment last summer which I really enjoyed, especially Brothers. I'm currently about 3/4 of the way through Anna Karenina. Is this really 'harder' than War and Peace? I started W&P last Easter, but only got a few chapters in before exams started, so decided to stop and save it for a time when I could really get in to it. I am finding it quite easy to read Anna Karenina alongside uni as all the chapters are really short. It's going OK reading only a few pages at a time, as I'm reading every day so still keeping up with the plot and the characters. I quite like how everyone in Russian books has several different names, it makes the characters sort of more endearing and realistic in some way.
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    (Original post by Mujeriego)
    It is an enduring read so I recommend you read it during the summer or any other holiday where you won't be easily disturbed. Coming back to it, 30 pages at a time or so, is really not worth it. Find a comfortable chair, a drink, a bookmark for the dramatis personae and you are set. I'm currently reading Anna Karenin which (imo) is the more difficult book. Especially when it comes to remembering the names.

    E.g, Princess Dárya Alexandrovna ---- > Dolly, Dásha, Dáshenka, Dollenka, etc. Every character has more than two nicknames so it gets confusing. :nothing:
    This. I actually gave up after 100 pages. I was :confused: all the time. :sigh:
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    Anna Karenina is better, it's sort of like Tolstoy- Light.
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    It took me a little over a year to read, but I did it! The translation I have is only partially translated, with the French still in it and the translation in the footnotes so I was forever glancing down to the bottom of the page and back up again, but my GCSE French came in handy for some parts.
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    (Original post by yahyahyahs)
    It took me a little over a year to read, but I did it! The translation I have is only partially translated, with the French still in it and the translation in the footnotes so I was forever glancing down to the bottom of the page and back up again, but my GCSE French came in handy for some parts.
    The translation is from Russian to English; if you translated the French bits as well then you would lose the significance of its use in a Russian text. As annoying as Dostoevsky's use of French is in The Devils, for example, it is used for a reason.
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    (Original post by Mujeriego)
    It is an enduring read so I recommend you read it during the summer or any other holiday where you won't be easily disturbed. Coming back to it, 30 pages at a time or so, is really not worth it. Find a comfortable chair, a drink, a bookmark for the dramatis personae and you are set. I'm currently reading Anna Karenin which (imo) is the more difficult book. Especially when it comes to remembering the names.

    :
    This. I tried to read it that way and just ended up getting lost. I'm going to read it properly when I have some spare time.
 
 
 
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