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    Started 2 or so months ago, for one of the bigger mid-tier firms, working in the corporation tax department - which people tell me is far more interesting than audit. Well, audit must be as dull as anything if thats the case. Ok, so fair enough, im a junior - and I spend most of the time doing admin - eg writing letters to clients, emails to people , completing money laundering forms etc - But the thing is, I dont see that changing for at least another 3 years.

    I spend about 20% of the time actually doing tax calculations - which is meant to be the interesting bit. My department is full of OCD women, who are super organised, really really picky about things. The thing that concerns me is that im just not that type of person - im more of the laid back yet commercially interested type - They all seem like hyper organised yet lacking any creativity or commericality.

    Tax seems to be one of those areas where your only really getting into the somewhat more interesting consultancy/commerical rather than the complaince aspect after youve served about 7 or so years (as a minimm) and have completed both ACA and CTA.....not sure I want to wait that long...plus I hate all the compliancy work i'll be doing till then. All my manager does is check things all day - hardly stimulating work...and shes in her late 20s/early 30s. Tax can be incredibly rewarding ( in many ways)...but it seems like you have to be 1) damn good, 2) damn experienced before you get to that type of work.

    Dont know what to do tbh.....
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    Why not apply to do the CTA straight away with a mid-tier firm so that after three years when you get the qualification you can move straight into an advisory/consultancy tax role. Although the first 3 years will be semi-admin work, if you show you're good at what you do surely they'll move you from compliance type roles to more tax calculations/advisory services if that's what you want to do? Sounds like you just don't like you tax department, in which case apply where there's a bigger tax department at a different company? ie. there will be lots more people your own age to have a laugh every now and then.
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    Presume you haven't finished your professional qualification. If you can't see yourself holding out 3 years then it's probably better to get out sooner rather than later. The best advisory engagements involving structuring and international tax work typically go to the big firms and even in a big corp tax group, as you say you need to be working for the right people. You might ahve to face the same problem when you lateral to a new tax group and you have to build up a reputation from scratch (not easy as the juniors who started there will be familiar and a known quality)

    If you want to leverage your tax experience, you might try and transfer in to an M&A tax group who seem to get a lot more restructuring and financing work for a PE acquisition or a valuation group (hell even due diligence has got to be more interesting than doing tax comps). I don't think you'll ever get around the focus on attention to detail or using precise language - that's critical to understanding tax and being any good at it.

    If you can find a group which appears to be quite top-heavy (i.e. more partners / directors than juniors) then the chances are you'll get much more stimulating work, and have close contact with senior colleagues where you get to really learn a lot more valuable commercial experience. Depending on the type of person your staff partner / group head is I'd consider having a word with them to set out your concerns.
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    I have a completely different experience with Corporate tax, but then again most of the admin is given to client admins and most of the data entry is outsourced. We get big clients so I'd imagine the work is a bit more interesting.
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    (Original post by Kemik)
    I have a completely different experience with Corporate tax, but then again most of the admin is given to client admins and most of the data entry is outsourced. We get big clients so I'd imagine the work is a bit more interesting.

    May I ask what a typical day would involve in your job - in terms of the tasks set etc ( during your initial training contract)

    My tasts at the mo include: Submission letters to HMRC, Engagement letters to clients, ringing HMRC to correct their errors, calculating a fee for a client and putting it on our system, setting up new clients on our system, basic tax comps and all the associated admin and checks which have to be done.
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    which firm?
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    Wow I'm glad you posted this. I was thinking of a career in corporation tax, but after reading this F it
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    (Original post by Umbra)
    Wow I'm glad you posted this. I was thinking of a career in corporation tax, but after reading this F it
    It won't be the same as at the Big Four, where there is more admin support.
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    I would have to say that I too have not had this experience in corporate tax - I'm with a big 4 firm however.

    Bear in mind that you have only been there 2 months. From my own experience, I would say that this is not enough time to make up your mind. In my first 6 months I too was doing a lot of engagement letters, set ups etc as you describe. But you have to be able to understand these processes and perfect them to be able to learn and move up to more interesting work.

    I still do some Engagement letters and set ups and filing, but these would be for my own client portfolio only (so this would mean once a year for each client) and takes about 5-10% of my time.

    The majority of my time is spent reviewing comps, preparing documents requesting additional information from the client regarding the comps, getting back to clients, finalising comps, putting through more complicated adjustments, doing independent checks etc.

    We do outsource a lot of our admin/simple computational work so I don't get to prepare as many comps from scratch as I would like. But I do get a few where we need a faster turn around time etc.

    I would encourage you to stick it out at least more than 2 months to see if it is for you. I would assume you will have clauses in your contract requiring you to repay your tuition fees too so make sure you are sure before you pull out.

    Hope this is helpful!
 
 
 
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