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    Hi,

    I just got my topic today. My topic is: the victim/villain paradigm, an analysis of the ambiguous protagonist in Hualing Nieh's Mulberry and Peach and Munshi Premchand's Nirmala. I'm totally lost right now and don't know where to start. Any help would be gladly appreciated!
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    Wait a second..."I just got my topic today." The way you articulated it implies that someone gave you a topic. I'm just making sure that this is not the case. YOUR TEACHER CANNOT MAKE THE TOPIC FOR YOU.

    Unfortunately, I have never read those works. But if you can't get anywhere with a topic or find it unfruitful, choose a new one ASAP. When you get a decent topic, make lots of notes from both of the works.

    Once you have all your notes out, you'll want a thesis. It's only temporary: it can change at the end and it must govern your whole essay. And from that, organize your ideas down into body paragraphs. Remember: author says this, textual evidence shows this, analysis shows this and therefore this. This is the kind of structure you want your paragraphs under. AND ALWAYS SAY THE EFFECT OF WHAT YOU ARE ANALYZING! Why does the author use this word? What's the effect of this device? How does it contribute towards the whole? What the ****'s the point? And then compare in your next paragraph.
    ...And your conclusion should follow.

    Anyway, I hope I've helped you a little bit. Be sure to talk to your teacher for more pieces of advice, especially if you are changing topics.
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    (Original post by The Man of the Hour)
    Wait a second..."I just got my topic today." The way you articulated it implies that someone gave you a topic. I'm just making sure that this is not the case. YOUR TEACHER CANNOT MAKE THE TOPIC FOR YOU.

    Unfortunately, I have never read those works. But if you can't get anywhere with a topic or find it unfruitful, choose a new one ASAP. When you get a decent topic, make lots of notes from both of the works. Or even better: stick to ONE WORK. It's much easier to handle, and you won't be hindered on the word count. I barely got to what I was going to say in the 1500 words I wrote, so I don't think you'll get through it all if you have two works. It's just my opinion, though. If you want two works, go right ahead.

    Once you have all your notes out, you'll want a thesis. It's only temporary: it can change at the end and it must govern your whole essay. And from that, organize your ideas down into body paragraphs. Remember: author says this, textual evidence shows this, analysis shows this and therefore this. This is the kind of structure you want your paragraphs under. AND ALWAYS SAY THE EFFECT OF WHAT YOU ARE ANALYZING! Why does the author use this word? What's the effect of this device? How does it contribute towards the whole? What the ****'s the point?
    ...And your conclusion should follow.

    Anyway, I hope I've helped you a little bit. Be sure to talk to your teacher for more pieces of advice, especially if you are changing topics.
    If it's the first World Literature essay, it must be comparative in nature.
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    (Original post by ragnar_jonsson)
    If it's the first World Literature essay, it must be comparative in nature.
    Jesus Christ, it's been soooo long since I did WL1. Haha. That's right. I've edited my post a little bit so I'm more helpful.
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    Thank you so much!! That really helped me
    And no, I came up with the topic myself. My teacher says he isn't going to help us with the world literature unit at all.
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    (Original post by emyys)
    My teacher says he isn't going to help us with the world literature unit at all.
    This is rather strange? Why won't he? He should consult your work (and your topic beforehand) with you, suggest improvements... You are officialy allowed to have drafts of your WLA's commented by your teacher...

    Anyway, as for the essay itself, there are basically two structures you can use in the body of the comparative essay:

    No. 1:
    Paragraph 1 : First aspect/argument in the first book
    Paragraph 2 : First aspect/argument in the second book
    ...

    No. 2:
    Paragraph 1 : First aspect/argument in both the books
    Paragraph 2 : Second aspect/argument in both the books
    ...

    I'd say it is easier to use the first structure (and it is likely to be clearer and better organized), but the second one is more effective in the comparison as you directly compare the books in one argument/paragraph; your paragraphs will be somewhat longer in the second structure (and it is much more complicated to have a crystal-clear organization in it). Having said this, I do not say the number one is a wrong structure, both can result into a perfect essay, it is mostly a matter of style, and of the way how you organize your thoughts and what is the way you can get your message across the most effectively and clearly.

    If you are struggling with coming up with ideas for your topic, change it, if it is not too late. When I was writing the comparative WLA, I came up with three topics (first of which my teacher really disliked), brainstormed all of them, wrote down possible structure, arguments, quotations... and the chose the one I could write the most about without any major ripping of hair

    By all means consult your work with your teacher if possible, he should help you with it...
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    Hi guys I'm doing my world lit paper 1, and I'm trying to come up with a question involving Medea and A Doll's House, have any of you ever done those books?
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    (Original post by toby01)
    Hi guys I'm doing my world lit paper 1, and I'm trying to come up with a question involving Medea and A Doll's House, have any of you ever done those books?
    Hmmm...it's been a long time since I read Medea. Do you have any idea of the direction that you want your essay to take?
    Personally the thing that's really interesting about those two texts is the way in which both Nora and Medea subvert traditional gender roles, particularly because Euripides and Ibsen were writing in time periods where women were regarded as inferior. Rather than remaining controlled by their respective husbands, Nora and Medea end by imposing their own authority and control upon men. Seeing as you only have 1500 words you may need to refine that a bit, but it's certainly an important aspect of both texts.
    Another important theme is that of manipulation - whilst Medea manipulates her children and husband in order to prove her worth, Nora is manipulated by Krogstad. So perhaps you could look at attitudes and reactions to manipulation...
    Just a couple of ideas; hope that helps
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    I really need an immediate reply...... PLZ!!!!
    When we write the paper, do we assume that the reader has already read the book???
    (meaning I don't have to summarize plot or explain characters??)

    Or do I have to include that? If so, how much of the entire paper should that portion take??
    100 -200 words???? Maybe???
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    (Original post by GarciaLorca)
    I really need an immediate reply...... PLZ!!!!
    When we write the paper, do we assume that the reader has already read the book???
    (meaning I don't have to summarize plot or explain characters??)

    Or do I have to include that? If so, how much of the entire paper should that portion take??
    100 -200 words???? Maybe???
    No, you don't need to summarise the plot - the examiner should be familiar with your texts. You may need to analyse characters though depending on your question...
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    The way I structured mine was a little different to what has been previously suggested but I think it still works (I got a 7 in English HL btw).

    My structure was:

    Thesis (which applies to both books; i.e. how both the authors demonstrate the same point)

    Then the rest of the essay was written essentially arguing for the thesis, showing how the authors took different approaches at times but essentially ended up at the same end-point.

    This is more implicit comparison contrast that the more common structures but I found it easier to write using my structure, and it can't have been marked too badly if I ended up with a 7.
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    hey people, i'm new to the site and not sure if i'm posting this in the right place, but here goes.

    iv'e got my world literature coming up, and iv'e got no clue what i'm going to do for it. The book choices i have, are as followed.

    The Reader
    Perfume
    Chronicle of a death foretold
    Metamorphosis

    I'll be grateful for any ideas
 
 
 
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