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What's the difference between a specialty registrar and a specialty doctor? Watch

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    Is it just that the specialty registrar is mainly a training position and specialty doctor is more of a permanent spot?
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    Hi

    Nomenclature in medicine is a bit complicated due to the fact that everything was renamed in 2007 with MMC, but some of the older names are still being used.

    A Specialist Registrar (SpR) before 2007 was someone who was basically in a training post for a speciality, the grade being between that of Senior House Officer (SHO) and that of Consultants.

    In 2007, The SHO grade was changed to CT1/2 (Core Training) and ST1/2 (Specialist Training). The CT grade was for those not yet in a speciality e.g. Core Medical or Core Surgical, the ST grade was for those going straight into specialist training (e.g. O&G, paediatrics, psychiatry).

    After CT2 or ST2, you now go in to ST3, 4,5, etc which is basically the equivalent to the old Specialist Registrar grade.

    WHere it gets confusing is that people who are NOT in training post used to be called Staff Grade, but some hospitals now call them Registrars. Whilst everyone at ST3 level like to call themselves Registrars too, mainly because otherwise everyone would be ST, and the more senior trainees don't want the same label as the younger ones.

    hope this helps.
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    (Original post by rudyrabbit)
    Hi

    Nomenclature in medicine is a bit complicated due to the fact that everything was renamed in 2007 with MMC, but some of the older names are still being used.

    A Specialist Registrar (SpR) before 2007 was someone who was basically in a training post for a speciality, the grade being between that of Senior House Officer (SHO) and that of Consultants.

    In 2007, The SHO grade was changed to CT1/2 (Core Training) and ST1/2 (Specialist Training). The CT grade was for those not yet in a speciality e.g. Core Medical or Core Surgical, the ST grade was for those going straight into specialist training (e.g. O&G, paediatrics, psychiatry).

    After CT2 or ST2, you now go in to ST3, 4,5, etc which is basically the equivalent to the old Specialist Registrar grade.

    WHere it gets confusing is that people who are NOT in training post used to be called Staff Grade, but some hospitals now call them Registrars. Whilst everyone at ST3 level like to call themselves Registrars too, mainly because otherwise everyone would be ST, and the more senior trainees don't want the same label as the younger ones.

    hope this helps.


    How thorough are we supposed to know about all these career progression paths?
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    (Original post by rudyrabbit)
    WHere it gets confusing is that people who are NOT in training post used to be called Staff Grade, but some hospitals now call them Registrars. Whilst everyone at ST3 level like to call themselves Registrars too, mainly because otherwise everyone would be ST, and the more senior trainees don't want the same label as the younger ones.
    Old money "Staff Grade" may also be called "Specialty Doctor".

    How thorough are we supposed to know about all these career progression paths?
    Hang around with doctors as a medical student for 3+ years and you'll pick it up. Another place to try would be the Modernising Medical Careers website where there is some kind of graph I think.
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    (Original post by rudyrabbit)
    Hi

    Nomenclature in medicine is a bit complicated due to the fact that everything was renamed in 2007 with MMC, but some of the older names are still being used.

    A Specialist Registrar (SpR) before 2007 was someone who was basically in a training post for a speciality, the grade being between that of Senior House Officer (SHO) and that of Consultants.

    In 2007, The SHO grade was changed to CT1/2 (Core Training) and ST1/2 (Specialist Training). The CT grade was for those not yet in a speciality e.g. Core Medical or Core Surgical, the ST grade was for those going straight into specialist training (e.g. O&G, paediatrics, psychiatry).

    After CT2 or ST2, you now go in to ST3, 4,5, etc which is basically the equivalent to the old Specialist Registrar grade.

    WHere it gets confusing is that people who are NOT in training post used to be called Staff Grade, but some hospitals now call them Registrars. Whilst everyone at ST3 level like to call themselves Registrars too, mainly because otherwise everyone would be ST, and the more senior trainees don't want the same label as the younger ones.

    hope this helps.
    The bold part isn't quite right. In 2007, the "ST" grade was given to people who had what was known as "run-through" - a job through to completion of CCT (Consultant training) - and encompassed old style SHO and SPR equivalents in all specialties.

    Managerial types recognized potential problems with this strategy and therefore in 2008, split training grades were introduced where a competitive application process was re-introduced at old SPR level (ST3 in some specialties/ST4 in others).

    Core training (CT1-3) is now almost identical to old style SHO training. A more cynical person would suggest they realized the new idea was completely flawed and they wanted to go back the old system and simply changed the titles to save face a little.
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    (Original post by angelscape)


    How thorough are we supposed to know about all these career progression paths?
    I would say you should know all the "standard" career progression stuff - foundation training -> CT/ST1 depending on specialty ->ST3 etc (Registrar level, except in paeds where ST3 is still SHO level) ->consultant eventually. As long as you are aware that there is also the option to take non-training jobs at various levels, I don't think you need to know too much about them - it starts to get very complicated!
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    if youve got an int coming up, then that blue book has a simple career progression page, once youve read that you can research in more detail
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    This book is extremely helpful for these sorts of questions. It's an interesting read on its own merits too!
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    why dont they just keep it simple like in the USA and rest of europe. 5 years residency for most specialties post med school and u're a consultant.
 
 
 
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