Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Okay so I've got a Sony A200 and I love it! However I've recently been looking at a lot of film photography and have really fallen in love with it, and this combined with the very reasonable prices of old Minoltas on eBay has made me want to make a few tentative steps into film. How hard is it to get good results with a film SLR? I think I'd probably feel a bit crippled without being able to look at what I've taken but people managed for years before digital came about so it can't be that hard, can it? My other concern is film ISO- how easy is it to change the film if the light levels change, or do you just go for 400+ to cover most eventualities?

    Oh and I don't know whether I really want to be buying all the developing paraphernalia straight off- is it an absolute sacrilege to get your film developed at Boots?

    Any info would be much appreciated!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ScarlettDangerfield)
    Okay so I've got a Sony A200 and I love it! However I've recently been looking at a lot of film photography and have really fallen in love with it, and this combined with the very reasonable prices of old Minoltas on eBay has made me want to make a few tentative steps into film. How hard is it to get good results with a film SLR? I think I'd probably feel a bit crippled without being able to look at what I've taken but people managed for years before digital came about so it can't be that hard, can it? My other concern is film ISO- how easy is it to change the film if the light levels change, or do you just go for 400+ to cover most eventualities?

    Oh and I don't know whether I really want to be buying all the developing paraphernalia straight off- is it an absolute sacrilege to get your film developed at Boots?

    Any info would be much appreciated!
    First of all you need to note that the film ISO isn't everything. A 50 or 100 ISO film is all you need so long as you have sufficiently fast lenses.
    If you are shooting in low light all the time and need high shutter speeds, use 400+ (even up to 3200 with B/W).

    You should shoot slide film, not colour negative unless you are a very casual photographer. Slides have far superior colour and better resolution. There are many labs around that will still develop/scan to CD your slides. My recommendation would be Fuji Velvia ISO50/100 film.

    You should not restrict yourself to Minolta though, there are many good film SLRs from days gone by, as well as their lenses on Ebay for pittance. Try looking for an Olympus OM-20 or OM-2 with a 50mm f/1.8 kit lens for starters or maybe an equivalent Nikon.

    Finally, why do you need to see what it looks like straight afterwards? You looked through the viewfinder when you took it didn't you?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ilford HP5+ is supposed to be ISO400, but you can "push" it to 3200 during development (obviously you have to set the camera manually to ISO3200, and shoot the whole film at that).

    As you are at University you might that the Photosoc has a darkroom and all the paraphernalia - I know Manchester does.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    400 ASA sort of came through as the standard with the rise of the idiotproof compact film cameras with very small apertures and fast shutters iirc - people used to think 100 ASA was 'standard' film 20 years ago. you get a larger grain with faster film as you probably know - which I think is aesthetically pleasing these days but it used to be taught that it was a problem.

    Ilford XP1 (monochrome) had a wide exposure latitude and took a standard C41 colour process... the pics came back with a bit of a colour cast but you could take them into the darkroom make lovely monochrome enlargements off it. There might have been a problem with the stability of the developed negs over a few years storage. it's been superceeded by XP2 now which I haven't tried but is presumably an improvement.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Joinedup)
    400 ASA sort of came through as the standard with the rise of the idiotproof compact film cameras with very small apertures and fast shutters iirc - people used to think 100 ASA was 'standard' film 20 years ago. you get a larger grain with faster film as you probably know - which I think is aesthetically pleasing these days but it used to be taught that it was a problem.

    Ilford XP1 (monochrome) had a wide exposure latitude and took a standard C41 colour process... the pics came back with a bit of a colour cast but you could take them into the darkroom make lovely monochrome enlargements off it. There might have been a problem with the stability of the developed negs over a few years storage. it's been superceeded by XP2 now which I haven't tried but is presumably an improvement.
    XP2 is a nice film to use. Lovely and contrasty and as you've said, uses the C41 process so any photoshop can process film for you, although I have sepia colour casts in the past but obviously this doesn't show up if you print on black and white paper. I haven't had any problems with stability with negs I shot 3 or 4 years ago yet.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Articles:

    The Student Room tech wikiTech forum guidelines

    Quick link:

    Unanswered technology and computers threads

    Sponsored features:

    Web Legend

    Win a Macbook Air!

    Blog about setting up a website for a chance to win in our Web Legend competition.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.