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    A day as an accident and emergency doctor

    You work in the emergency department at your local NHS hospital, and your first patient is a 6 year old who has been hit by a car on his way to school. You lead a team of healthcare professionals in resuscitating the child. At the same time you are supervising the management of two other patients in the resuscitation room, one is a man who is having a heart attack and the other is a lady with a miscarriage. Shortly after these patients have been transferred to specialist wards you talk to the parents of the child who have just arrived in a distraught state. The day then gets busy.. Throughout your shift, you work through a queue of patients who have all sorts of injuries and complaints. You never know quite who or what will come through the door next.
    Does this sound like you?

    You like making quick decisions and living moment-to-moment. You work well in a team, stay calm under pressure and can communicate with people from all walks of life.
    What's next after GCSE?

    You'll need a minimum of five A-C GCSE grades (or the equivalent), preferably including a science subject, and be all set to take at least three A levels (or the equivalent).
    What's next after A level and beyond?

    You'll need to apply for a GMC-recognised degree in Medicine at university. Getting three good A/ AS level grades (or the equivalent) is essential, as medicine is a very competitive area. It's important to check different university entry requirements as these vary between institutions.

    WHAT DOES GMC MEAN
    THANKS
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    General Medical Council and you will need more than 5 A-C GCSE grades....
    Try 10 A-A* grades and you will be getting close.
    Good Luck
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    http://tinyurl.com/26plkzb
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    Well, it's kind of true (though not always as straightforward as that makes it sound). But you will generally need much higher GCSEs than that. Have a read of the medicine wiki on here to get more information on how to get into medicine and a bit about what it actually involves.
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    If only it was that easy :moon:
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    (Original post by My Life)
    A day as an accident and emergency doctor

    You work in the emergency department at your local NHS hospital, and your first patient is a 6 year old who has been hit by a car on his way to school. You lead a team of healthcare professionals in resuscitating the child. At the same time you are supervising the management of two other patients in the resuscitation room, one is a man who is having a heart attack and the other is a lady with a miscarriage. Shortly after these patients have been transferred to specialist wards you talk to the parents of the child who have just arrived in a distraught state. The day then gets busy.. Throughout your shift, you work through a queue of patients who have all sorts of injuries and complaints. You never know quite who or what will come through the door next.
    Does this sound like you?
    Bull****, MIs wait in minors, miscarriages get turfed to gynae and trauma goes elsewhere.
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    general medical council
    you'll need way higher GCSEs than 5 A*s-Cs

    was that piece written years ago?

    cause as far as i can tell, with the opening of trauma centres in london, you wouldn't have all those types of cases all together, from my work experience, most RTCs are taken to larger hospitals so unless you work at one, you probably won't see one, most miscarriages are either untraumatic and the patient deals with it at home, or goes to obs and gynae for specialist help, and myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) either wait in cubicles or go to the coronary care unit as fast as possible.

    i need to do more work experience to confirm that though.
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    Thankyou!
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    Thanks everyone
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    Just checking that you do realise that the first half of your post was only relevant to some doctors. Not all doctors have lifestyles like that.
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    Aim for 5 A*-C if you like rejection letters and e-mails
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    (Original post by laurie:))
    general medical council
    you'll need way higher GCSEs than 5 A*s-Cs

    was that piece written years ago?

    cause as far as i can tell, with the opening of trauma centres in london, you wouldn't have all those types of cases all together, from my work experience, most RTCs are taken to larger hospitals so unless you work at one, you probably won't see one, most miscarriages are either untraumatic and the patient deals with it at home, or goes to obs and gynae for specialist help, and myocardial infarctions (heart attacks) either wait in cubicles or go to the coronary care unit as fast as possible.

    i need to do more work experience to confirm that though.
    ok, this is totally off topic but I couldn't help but notice you took psychology for A-Level. I want to do medicine and i am concidering taking pschology. Is it any good?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by GoldenCakes02)
    ok, this is totally off topic but I couldn't help but notice you took psychology for A-Level. I want to do medicine and i am concidering taking pschology. Is it any good?
    Thanks
    I do it too. It's not particularly any more useful than something like Physics would be..Chemistry and Biology are your main ones, I think. For me it's an easy A lol, and everything is so competitive now for Medicine that I actually want to aim for an A* :P.
    Some people do find it quite difficult though 'cause it takes ages to revise for :rolleyes:
    Good luck
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    (Original post by GoldenCakes02)
    ok, this is totally off topic but I couldn't help but notice you took psychology for A-Level. I want to do medicine and i am concidering taking pschology. Is it any good?
    Thanks
    I'm still taking it only in year 12 at the moment!

    but yeah, i really like it although i seem to be in the minority when i talk to other people. you get to learn about all kinds of odd psychologists, some of them really are a bit wierd.

    however, don't take it as a kind of 'doss subject', if you take it, you have to expect the amount of work to be of the same level of your other subjects, and there is a lot of writing and essay planning to do.

    if you are interested in it, go for it, i love it and its one of my favourite subjects as well!
 
 
 
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