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Calling all Aspies! and Auties and PDDNOS Watch

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    Okay,I just wanted to know if there are any people with an ASD applying to uni or at uni. And how you're feeling about it and what you are concerned about if anything!

    I don't have an ASD officially but I think I may have Asperger's.

    If you have aspergic tendencies or are on the spectrum Reply!!

    :rolleyes:
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    Urgh, you can't self-diagnose Asperger's :mad:
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    Urgh, you can't self-diagnose Asperger's :mad:
    You can have a suspicion.Yes,it is difficult to know what you're doing wrong. Does self-diagnosis disgust you?
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    You can have a suspicion.Yes,it is difficult to know what you're doing wrong. Does self-diagnosis disgust you?
    It doesn't disgust me, I just get annoyed when (untrained) people try to self diagnose it just because they're (for example) shy, socially awkward or just need to grow a pair. A lot of people attribute these characteristics quite wrongly to Asperger's just because that is their stereotypical view of someone who has it.

    It's fine to have a suspicion by all means, but seek professional advice.
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    (Original post by A Mysterious Lord)
    It doesn't disgust me, I just get annoyed when (untrained) people try to self diagnose it just because they're (for example) shy, socially awkward or just need to grow a pair. A lot of people attribute these characteristics quite wrongly to Asperger's just because that is their stereotypical view of someone who has it.

    It's fine to have a suspicion by all means, but seek professional advice.
    Oh yes , I agree with the mistaking introverted/shy for Asperger's thing.And I don't like stereotypes.It belittles what a person with an ASD could be going through.

    Do you have an ASD?
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    I have AS and I'm applying to university. I actually went for a few months last year, but the course wasn't what it was promised to be so I quit. I'll be heading back there for a different course in September.

    Unfortunately the little bit of university life that I did experience was so much more worse than all the bad things I'd imagined before going, so right now my mindset ranges from total denial of what's to come to coming up with a zillion strategies on how I could cope.

    PS. This doesn't mean university will be horrible for everyone on the spectrum. Actually it seems that most other people on TSR who have an ASD and have gone to university have done rather well.
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    (Original post by Peregrinum)
    I have AS and I'm applying to university. I actually went for a few months last year, but the course wasn't what it was promised to be so I quit. I'll be heading back there for a different course in September.

    Unfortunately the little bit of university life that I did experience was so much more worse than all the bad things I'd imagined before going, so right now my mindset ranges from total denial of what's to come to coming up with a zillion strategies on how I could cope.

    PS. This doesn't mean university will be horrible for everyone on the spectrum. Actually it seems that most other people on TSR who have an ASD and have gone to university have done rather well.
    Hello! I've had a terrible experience at school and resorted to self teaching my A2s.I hope its different from school. It'll be easier for me since I'll be staying home.

    I hope your zillion strategys help. I commend your bravery!!!Well done!
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    You can have a suspicion.Yes,it is difficult to know what you're doing wrong. Does self-diagnosis disgust you?
    Go and get formally diagnosed. I'm pretty sure people who actually have the aspergers are tired of people like you running around saying you are an aspie whilst in reality you are simply seeking to blame all your social problems on a disorder which you don't have.
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    (Original post by Kerny)
    Go and get formally diagnosed. I'm pretty sure people who actually have the aspergers are tired of people like you running around saying you are an aspie whilst in reality you are simply seeking to blame all your social problems on a disorder which you don't have.
    I'm sorry it annoys you that I suspect I have an ASD and have not seeked out a formal diagnosis.
    FYI I know many people with ASDs and they are not annoyed by me at all.
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    In order to have a "real" diagnosable ASD you must present difficulties in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. If you have some autistic traits, but no clinically significant difficulties then you'd probably be described as being on the broader autism phenotype. If you do have difficulties with functioning then I suggest you seek a diagnosis - social situations aren't the only trap once you're at university. For example, I have articulation difficulties (both in oral and written communication) and sensory issues and they can really affect my ability to do well academically (even though otherwise I'm more than capable). For example, trying to concentrate in lectures can be really difficult due to inability to filter out background noise. Tutorials can be really uncomfortable because they allow a mix of social and communication difficulties (like I may not know what is expected of me unless it's clearly spelled out).
    I did my high school diploma via a distance learning course and because this path lacks the elements of normal classroom discussion and all that, the switch to university was that much more difficult for me (as it probably is for most students who don't follow the traditional path) because the gap was way more obvious. It's easier for those who go from high school classes to university lectures, but if you've "missed out" on traditional secondary education then it may be much more difficult to reorient yourself and adjust in the new environment. And having Asperger's really doesn't help. But having a formal diagnosis allows you to access certain types of help.
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    (Original post by Peregrinum)
    In order to have a "real" diagnosable ASD you must present difficulties in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. If you have some autistic traits, but no clinically significant difficulties then you'd probably be described as being on the broader autism phenotype. If you do have difficulties with functioning then I suggest you seek a diagnosis - social situations aren't the only trap once you're at university. For example, I have articulation difficulties (both in oral and written communication) and sensory issues and they can really affect my ability to do well academically (even though otherwise I'm more than capable). For example, trying to concentrate in lectures can be really difficult due to inability to filter out background noise. Tutorials can be really uncomfortable because they allow a mix of social and communication difficulties (like I may not know what is expected of me unless it's clearly spelled out).
    I did my high school diploma via a distance learning course and because this path lacks the elements of normal classroom discussion and all that, the switch to university was that much more difficult for me (as it probably is for most students who don't follow the traditional path) because the gap was way more obvious. It's easier for those who go from high school classes to university lectures, but if you've "missed out" on traditional secondary education then it may be much more difficult to reorient yourself and adjust in the new environment. And having Asperger's really doesn't help. But having a formal diagnosis allows you to access certain types of help.
    The diagnositic procedure is soo daunting and I don't want to drag my parents into things again.They have horrible associations with the psychologist/psychiatrists as do I.

    I had these problems that you're describing at school. I couldn't learn in lessons at all. I did all my learning on my own.
    Are tutorials compulsory?
    I was hoping I'd get through uni by just attending lectures to get notes and a jist of what I'm supposed to know then go home and learn it.

    What course do you want to do?
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    Hey, do any of you guys wanna help me bankrupt a casino next week?
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    The diagnositic procedure is soo daunting and I don't want to drag my parents into things again.They have horrible associations with the psychologist/psychiatrists as do I.

    I had these problems that you're describing at school. I couldn't learn in lessons at all. I did all my learning on my own.
    Are tutorials compulsory?
    I was hoping I'd get through uni by just attending lectures to get notes and a jist of what I'm supposed to know then go home and learn it.

    What course do you want to do?
    I want to do Biochemistry & Molecular Cell Biology at Sheffield (I have an unofficial unconditional) so I guess the study process would be pretty much the same as for Chemistry. Tutorials are very much compulsory. We were told in the intro lectures that if you miss two lab classes or tutorials then you will have to have a meeting with the year tutor or the department head and if you don't have any good reasons for not showing up and continue to miss those classes then you'll be expelled before you know it. I didn't go to any tutorials (I had already decided I didn't want to continue on Sheffield's Biology course) and received an e-mail from my personal tutor's secretary right after not showing up for the first one. They really do keep track of what you do and don't do... Oh yeah, they grade the tutorials as well. And you also have to do presentations. And then there are the lab classes. *sigh* I love the subject, but I really don't want to go through all that.
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    (Original post by Peregrinum)
    I want to do Biochemistry & Molecular Cell Biology at Sheffield (I have an unofficial unconditional) so I guess the study process would be pretty much the same as for Chemistry. Tutorials are very much compulsory. We were told in the intro lectures that if you miss two lab classes or tutorials then you will have to have a meeting with the year tutor or the department head and if you don't have any good reasons for not showing up and continue to miss those classes then you'll be expelled before you know it. I didn't go to any tutorials (I had already decided I didn't want to continue on Sheffield's Biology course) and received an e-mail from my personal tutor's secretary right after not showing up for the first one. They really do keep track of what you do and don't do... Oh yeah, they grade the tutorials as well. And you also have to do presentations. And then there are the lab classes. *sigh* I love the subject, but I really don't want to go through all that.
    *Eep* :/ I hope it's different at birmingham. Could it be? How do they grade tutorials!I can't think when theres a bunch of people staring at me or around me in an unorganised form. I knew about the presentations... maybe my doctor will help me out. What's yours like?
    Uni sounds like sixth form! I wasn't at my peak in sixth form.

    I Love chemistry! I might going to apply it to biology once Iknow ins and outs of it.

    So what made you apply again? Your field needs you! Perservere this time! Can we be online friends?

    Yey, I know other girl aspies but your the first one who likes science!And is around my age.
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    *Eep* :/ I hope it's different at birmingham. Could it be? How do they grade tutorials!I can't think when theres a bunch of people staring at me or around me in an unorganised form. I knew about the presentations... maybe my doctor will help me out. What's yours like?
    Uni sounds like sixth form! I wasn't at my peak in sixth form.

    I Love chemistry! I might going to apply it to biology once Iknow ins and outs of it.

    So what made you apply again? Your field needs you! Perservere this time! Can we be online friends?

    Yey, I know other girl aspies but your the first one who likes science!And is around my age.
    I have no idea how they grade tutorials. Sheffield has Programme Specifications on their website, maybe Birmingham has something similar as well. Anyhow, it says that there are data analysis sessions (same as tutorials?) which consist of instruction, discussion, and practice; and then there are tutorials mentioned separately, but both type of classes are assessed and supervisors will provide oral and written feedback (which counts toward the practical module grade).

    A doctor can help you in terms of diagnosing you. Mine is good, scientifically-oriented and not too touchy-feely. She works with both kids and adults and the center provides numerous therapies for kids with autism spectrum disorders so I knew she'd be familiar with the condition (many unfortunately aren't). If you choose to go to a doctor then pick a young one - Asperger's only came to exist as a formal diagnosis in 1994 (in the DSM) so going to someone who has completed their residency in the late 1980s or earlier is probably a waste of time.

    I decided to change course because the original one wasn't what it was made out to be. All the brochures say that you can take up to a third of your modules from the other two biology departments (Sheffield has three) and I counted on it, I made my choice to go there because of that, but when I got there it turned out that it's not possible (all the classes are completely full, etc.). I intend to go all the way to a PhD so I thought it'd be best not to specialize too heavily too early on and decided to do a broad biology degree. But then I was forced to rethink my plans and since I'm certain that my future lies in the molecular biosciences I might as well go into it right away. Almost all straight biology degrees are focused on organismal biology anyway, and that's just boring. Sheffield's biochem program is broad enough, specific enough, without the ubiquitous biomedicine slant, and in the top 5 for biosciences, and all that is exactly what I want. I just wish I had realized that a little bit sooner. Oh well, there are dozens of reason why it's better this way anyway. By the way, I just received my very own Molecular Cell Biology by Lodish (basically this subject's bible) and now I spend all my days reading and memorizing that (yeah, special interest transformed into an obsession) so that when I get there in 9 months I can show them that no "disability" is going to hold me back.

    Heh, I might not be as "your age" as you might think. It took me two extra years to get through high school because I had some serious problems before being diagnosed, and now I'm missing another year. If everything had gone according to "the schedule" then I'd be graduating from a BSc program this spring. However, I'm not, I'll be starting my MSci just a few months after turning 22. Mentally and experientially, however, I'm not over 13 or 14.
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    (Original post by Peregrinum)
    I have no idea how they grade tutorials. Sheffield has Programme Specifications on their website, maybe Birmingham has something similar as well. Anyhow, it says that there are data analysis sessions (same as tutorials?) which consist of instruction, discussion, and practice; and then there are tutorials mentioned separately, but both type of classes are assessed and supervisors will provide oral and written feedback (which counts toward the practical module grade).

    A doctor can help you in terms of diagnosing you. Mine is good, scientifically-oriented and not too touchy-feely. She works with both kids and adults and the center provides numerous therapies for kids with autism spectrum disorders so I knew she'd be familiar with the condition (many unfortunately aren't). If you choose to go to a doctor then pick a young one - Asperger's only came to exist as a formal diagnosis in 1994 (in the DSM) so going to someone who has completed their residency in the late 1980s or earlier is probably a waste of time.

    I decided to change course because the original one wasn't what it was made out to be. All the brochures say that you can take up to a third of your modules from the other two biology departments (Sheffield has three) and I counted on it, I made my choice to go there because of that, but when I got there it turned out that it's not possible (all the classes are completely full, etc.). I intend to go all the way to a PhD so I thought it'd be best not to specialize too heavily too early on and decided to do a broad biology degree. But then I was forced to rethink my plans and since I'm certain that my future lies in the molecular biosciences I might as well go into it right away. Almost all straight biology degrees are focused on organismal biology anyway, and that's just boring. Sheffield's biochem program is broad enough, specific enough, without the ubiquitous biomedicine slant, and in the top 5 for biosciences, and all that is exactly what I want. I just wish I had realized that a little bit sooner. Oh well, there are dozens of reason why it's better this way anyway. By the way, I just received my very own Molecular Cell Biology by Lodish (basically this subject's bible) and now I spend all my days reading and memorizing that (yeah, special interest transformed into an obsession) so that when I get there in 9 months I can show them that no "disability" is going to hold me back.

    Heh, I might not be as "your age" as you might think. It took me two extra years to get through high school because I had some serious problems before being diagnosed, and now I'm missing another year. If everything had gone according to "the schedule" then I'd be graduating from a BSc program this spring. However, I'm not, I'll be starting my MSci just a few months after turning 22. Mentally and experientially, however, I'm not over 13 or 14.
    Oh I'm 19 so your close the other girls/ladies are either 10 or 30ish. I love new textbooks!More than I'm able to love people. I don't like to be ahead.I like to be the same place everyone else is so. instead of reading a chem book I'll probably be contining with my "Guyton and Halls textbook of medical physiology" Which is just amazing! The way the information is arranged and ordered and the language.And of course I've always been into medical physiology.

    How are you liking Lodish?You sound very determined! Maybe you could be the next Lodish. And I could be recommending your book to my grandkids/students haha.
    I mainly have problems with anxiety/stress/low mood when im around people. Maybe some drugs could help with that.But I'll wait until I actually get to uni first to bug my doc.
    So tell me something new/interesting you've learnt from your shiny new book!

    Mentally i oscillate between 8 and 80 haha!

    I LIKE YOU. (not in a weird way don't worry)
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    (Original post by Destroyviruses)
    Oh I'm 19 so your close the other girls/ladies are either 10 or 30ish. I love new textbooks!More than I'm able to love people. I don't like to be ahead.I like to be the same place everyone else is so. instead of reading a chem book I'll probably be contining with my "Guyton and Halls textbook of medical physiology" Which is just amazing! The way the information is arranged and ordered and the language.And of course I've always been into medical physiology.

    How are you liking Lodish?You sound very determined! Maybe you could be the next Lodish. And I could be recommending your book to my grandkids/students haha.
    I mainly have problems with anxiety/stress/low mood when im around people. Maybe some drugs could help with that.But I'll wait until I actually get to uni first to bug my doc.
    So tell me something new/interesting you've learnt from your shiny new book!

    Mentally i oscillate between 8 and 80 haha!

    I LIKE YOU. (not in a weird way don't worry)
    I PM'ed my response.
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    Thought I might as well get my 2 cents in. Have Aspergers and am at uni studying Law & Politics (I'm a first year).

    Uni started off quite badly on the social side for me - I lived in uni accommodation and there were a few incidents with my flatmates (one of them apparently really hated me), I wasn't happy so after a month I moved into different accommodation and now I couldn't be happier.

    What I'd say is that when applying for accommodation, go for one where there's loads of people living near you. Where I am now, there's around 18 of us in our "flat", and it doesn't really matter if you don't talk much to your housemates then, as there's so many of you and you'd be coming and going at different times. Where I was before, it was just the 6 of us and it felt like a prison to me, especially as the other 5 would make something for all of them, whereas I was expected to make stuff for myself (which I didn't mind, unless when they hogged the oven so I couldn't eat for a good while).

    Academic side - it's been alright so far. Got a 74 on my first Politics assignment (yay) and it looks as though I might do okay on both my law assignments that I've handed in so far, so that's good. If your subject is not anything like the sciences or practical stuff, then it's okay if you don't go to some of your lectures, especially if they're at odd times of day. Do go to your seminars as much as possible though, as then you'll know whether you've understood the material (plus if you have missed a lecture, then you can catch up in the seminar). Also, see if you can get DSA, as that could come in quite useful academically.


    ^^ Think that's enough said
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    (Original post by HpFreak_Amy7192)
    What I'd say is that when applying for accommodation, go for one where there's loads of people living near you. Where I am now, there's around 18 of us in our "flat", and it doesn't really matter if you don't talk much to your housemates then, as there's so many of you and you'd be coming and going at different times. Where I was before, it was just the 6 of us and it felt like a prison to me, especially as the other 5 would make something for all of them, whereas I was expected to make stuff for myself (which I didn't mind, unless when they hogged the oven so I couldn't eat for a good while).
    Wow, that is like the total opposite of what I'd do. I was in an apartment with 8 bedrooms, but this time I'm definitely going for no more than 3-4. I guess it depends on where most of your problems lie. Unfortunately change of surroundings/routine and adjusting are big problems for me so I like to keep my environment as static and predictable as possible. I absolutely hated living with seven strangers; I never knew when they were coming or going, they'd be in the kitchen at odd times or inviting other people from other apartments to our place when I least expected it, etc. I hope that I'm right in thinking that "eliminating" some people would also eliminate the problems they bring with them because I really don't want to go through all that again. Too many people is my prison.
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    (Original post by Peregrinum)
    Wow, that is like the total opposite of what I'd do. I was in an apartment with 8 bedrooms, but this time I'm definitely going for no more than 3-4. I guess it depends on where most of your problems lie. Unfortunately change of surroundings/routine and adjusting are big problems for me so I like to keep my environment as static and predictable as possible. I absolutely hated living with seven strangers; I never knew when they were coming or going, they'd be in the kitchen at odd times or inviting other people from other apartments to our place when I least expected it, etc. I hope that I'm right in thinking that "eliminating" some people would also eliminate the problems they bring with them because I really don't want to go through all that again. Too many people is my prison.
    Ah, see where I am, we don't have a communal area as such, there is a bar and gym on the bottom floor but I hardly ever go down there so it's not a problem for me. Plus, we have 2 bathrooms and 2 kitchens in our flat, so there's hardly ever a time where someone will be in the kitchen (a couple of freezers and ovens in each kitchen, so even if there is someone in there at the same time, it's not a problem).

    If we ever invite anyone back we usually just stay in our rooms with them. Only problem for me is that with where my room is (and where the actual place is), I can hear everyone coming back from the nightclub round by us, and the pipes go through my room so it's a little annoying sometimes.

    It depends on the person. If they're like me where they're more independent as such and are happy to do stuff for themselves and spend time on their own, then they might be more suited to somewhere like where I am at, whereas if they want a nice, close unit, then somewhere like where I was before might be better.
 
 
 
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