Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Will Access apps' miss out in the rush to beat fee increase? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have read several articles in the press regarding the rush of applications to beat the fee increase.
    What worries me is that applications from access courses will be bottom of the pile.

    An addmissions tutor I spoke to two weeks ago all but confirmed this and told me she would select A levels over access and as the course was already oversubscribed she doubted if any access course applications would be considered.

    This news was a massive blow and I wondered if anyone else has any similar experience of this.

    Worried

    Yorksoul
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I dont believe so.

    Theres a thread on Access Course Offers and people have been made offers from good unis.

    Ive just received an offer from UWE. As long as your application is strong then you stand just as much chance as anyone imo.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yorksoul)
    I have read several articles in the press regarding the rush of applications to beat the fee increase.
    What worries me is that applications from access courses will be bottom of the pile.

    An addmissions tutor I spoke to two weeks ago all but confirmed this and told me she would select A levels over access and as the course was already oversubscribed she doubted if any access course applications would be considered.

    This news was a massive blow and I wondered if anyone else has any similar experience of this.

    Worried

    Yorksoul
    Some admissions tutors / Unis just don't like alternative qualifications (access, btec, etc). It may just be that this one woman you spoke to is one of those snobs who looks down on anything but A* A* A* @ A-level.

    I think it depends on how strong your application is and how competitive entry for the course you are applying for usually is.

    Try phoning around some different Universities and speaking to other admissions tutors in the area you want to study.

    I have 2 offers already and my application isn't all that strong on paper. The subject I am studying isn't as competitive as some others BUT it isn't mickey mouse either.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BigV)
    Some admissions tutors / Unis just don't like alternative qualifications (access, btec, etc). It may just be that this one woman you spoke to is one of those snobs who looks down on anything but A* A* A* @ A-level.

    I think it depends on how strong your application is and how competitive entry for the course you are applying for usually is.

    Try phoning around some different Universities and speaking to other admissions tutors in the area you want to study.

    I have 2 offers already and my application isn't all that strong on paper. The subject I am studying isn't as competitive as some others BUT it isn't mickey mouse either.
    I agree with Big V on this viewpoint Access courses are still in my view and i am sure other mature students will also agree with me on this point,highly respected and viewed quite well by the various universities no matter what Access Course you undertake or what degree you are aiming for.You just need to make the strongest UCAS application you can and see what occurs after you have sent it off to the various universities.As Big V has also stated " you are always going to get a selective few universities who dont like taking Access Applicants and prefer the A Level applicant instead".It just means you need to throughly research each university you considering and make sure each one considers Access applicants flavourably and then apply and wait and see what happens.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    People from my Access to Science course are getting offers, and I've been invited to an open day at Bristol, which is a good uni. I did get a rejection from Bath but it was for my most out there choice, and I had no work experience to include in my personal statement, and wasn't willing to lie about it.

    One thing I do think is important is to show a breakdown of the units you'll be studying, showing the different elements. For example, saying "biochemistry, homeostasis and genetics" under the heading of biology is more impacting than just including no units.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ½+½)
    People from my Access to Science course are getting offers, and I've been invited to an open day at Bristol, which is a good uni. I did get a rejection from Bath but it was for my most out there choice, and I had no work experience to include in my personal statement, and wasn't willing to lie about it.

    One thing I do think is important is to show a breakdown of the units you'll be studying, showing the different elements. For example, saying "biochemistry, homeostasis and genetics" under the heading of biology is more impacting than just including no units.
    i should have probably done that :rolleyes:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I have 3 offers so far so I don't think so. One from leicester which I was fairly amazed about
    I agree with the others, so long as you're application is strong it won't matter if you're on access or not. I had a bit of a panic about this a few weeks back but was reassured by many on here that we actually have a slight edge over a level applicants as we have sacrificed mroe to return to education and have had more time to really consider what we want to do, unis love mature students!
    Good Luck
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alibobs)
    I have 3 offers so far so I don't think so. One from leicester which I was fairly amazed about
    I agree with the others, so long as you're application is strong it won't matter if you're on access or not. I had a bit of a panic about this a few weeks back but was reassured by many on here that we actually have a slight edge over a level applicants as we have sacrificed mroe to return to education and have had more time to really consider what we want to do, unis love mature students!
    Good Luck
    very well done to you!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by j0nnn)
    very well done to you!
    why thank you

    Oh, and also I didn't put a breakdown of my modules in either although i did send my syllabus off to one uni at their request but can't remember who now
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alibobs)
    why thank you

    Oh, and also I didn't put a breakdown of my modules in either although i did send my syllabus off to one uni at their request but can't remember who now
    Congratulations

    I think the module breakdown is probably more important with the sciences to be honest. My Access to Science group were encouraged to put them down, I'm not sure if everyone did though. I guess it depends on the course they were applying to. Physiotherapy seems to have been a popular choice!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Yorksoul)
    I have read several articles in the press regarding the rush of applications to beat the fee increase.
    What worries me is that applications from access courses will be bottom of the pile.

    An addmissions tutor I spoke to two weeks ago all but confirmed this and told me she would select A levels over access and as the course was already oversubscribed she doubted if any access course applications would be considered.

    This news was a massive blow and I wondered if anyone else has any similar experience of this.

    Worried

    Yorksoul
    Unfortunatey for Unis, they have to fulfill certain criteria for the government, for example, a certain amount of mature students, or studetns whose parents didn't make it to univcersity, or students who were private educated or have 'alternate' qualifications.

    Fortunately for us, that means that there is a much, much greater chance we will get an offer over a 'normal' a level applicant.

    For example, the requirements for the degrees I want to do from Access in no way translate to the same attainment level as the A level requirements. Add to the fact that I'm female and wanting to do a pure science course and my chances shoot up.

    I don't think we're at a disadvantage, quite the contrary.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alexa2101)
    Unfortunatey for Unis, they have to fulfill certain criteria for the government, for example, a certain amount of mature students, or studetns whose parents didn't make it to univcersity, or students who were private educated or have 'alternate' qualifications.

    Fortunately for us, that means that there is a much, much greater chance we will get an offer over a 'normal' a level applicant.

    For example, the requirements for the degrees I want to do from Access in no way translate to the same attainment level as the A level requirements. Add to the fact that I'm female and wanting to do a pure science course and my chances shoot up.

    I don't think we're at a disadvantage, quite the contrary.
    Do you have any sources for this?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by josh_v)
    Do you have any sources for this?
    My grandmother was a lecturer at Chester and was often involved in admissions. Granted this was about 10 years ago, but they were considering contextual factors then already.

    Here is a BBC article about how Oxford started using a contextual system with their condidates: http://www.mikebakereducation.co.uk/...s-what-is-fair

    And Edinburgh themselves say they consider contextual factors:
    http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/undergr...lection/select

    Granted they're not so open as to say sex (for some courses) or age are a factor, but you can bet you've got a slight edge if (for example) your a girl, 20+ applying for mathematics.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Ah thank you.

    Im not sure whether i agree with this method.

    I see the benefits and it would benefit me, the school i attended was poor, gained about 30% for 5 a-c grades at GCSE, no one else in my family has been to uni, i dont live in a particularly affluent postcode. I can understand why these factors do affect someones chance of getting into uni, as there was no emphasis in my school on achieving A*s and As so you could go to uni.

    However, there is the argument that why should someone be discriminated against because their parents went to uni or because their school was successful.

    Whilst it benefits me though ill keep on supporting!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by josh_v)
    Ah thank you.

    Im not sure whether i agree with this method.

    I see the benefits and it would benefit me, the school i attended was poor, gained about 30% for 5 a-c grades at GCSE, no one else in my family has been to uni, i dont live in a particularly affluent postcode. I can understand why these factors do affect someones chance of getting into uni, as there was no emphasis in my school on achieving A*s and As so you could go to uni.

    However, there is the argument that why should someone be discriminated against because their parents went to uni or because their school was successful.

    Whilst it benefits me though ill keep on supporting!
    No problem

    I completely agree. I don't think universities should be given socioeconomic information about applicants. its should purely be based one your academic abilities, passion and how successful you would be on the course. That being said, I'm quite happy to be on the positive side of something for once. I'm a hypocrite, but oh well
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Whilst UCAS do ask for information about your parents' occupation, this information is not given to unis. No information about that kind of thing is given, unless your referee chooses to put it in your reference. So yes unis can see your age and sex, and if they really wanted to they could look up schools in league tables etc, but this does not mean it's used in making offers. There are no "criteria" from the government about applications so to think that you have an advantage just by being female is naive at best.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Personally, I wouldn't call it naive to think that you have an advantage by being different from the norm in a particular field. It gives you an edge, makes you memorable and stops your application from going straight into the bin.

    Whilst there is no official criteria, I'm pretty sure a university would get in slightly hot water if for a few years they only admitted white people, or people from private schooling, or who spoke fluent welsh. If the statistics were skewed in a particular direction, I'm sure they would try to gradually correct the difference.

    Just like with offers I suppose. It shouldn't matter whether you apply in September or on January 14th, but at some universities/course it (unofficially) does.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    If your only reason for being memorable is being female (or whatever) then you have a really weak application.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juno)
    If your only reason for being memorable is being female (or whatever) then you have a really weak application.
    Okay,

    1. The female thing was being used as an example. Reading waaaay too much between the lines there.
    2. This is a forum that is meant to help students, and allow them to gossip away about their applications and conspiracy theories and what have you; let us talk our bull**** as we have nothing to do but wait RE UCAS at the moment.
    3. I realise you have alot of + reps, and a major amount of postage to your name, but lay off ok? Whats with the personal attack?
    4. (Just to play at your level) If my applicatoin is so weak, could you please expain to me how I got an offer to one of the top science universities in the country 3 days after sending in my application?


    No nasties on here please. "Can't we all just get along?" :confused:
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I was using it an example, so it wasn't a personal attack. Clearly your application wasn't that weak then :rolleyes: which means you didn't get an offer just because you were female. You can talk bull**** about anything else, but someone will read this and believe it and then you will **** up their application. How is that helping students as you said?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.