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    What does this means exactly? I've come across it looking at PGCE req's.

    I have average GCSE's (B's and C's) and 3 B's at A level with a further C at AS - would the University of Manchester consider this a "strong academic record"?

    This term seems incredibly vague - I went to a poor school and although my grades are average-ish overall, they were in the top 5 or 10 for the school I went to. Will this be considered at all?
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    (Original post by hagrid's big toe)
    What does this means exactly? I've come across it looking at PGCE req's.

    I have average GCSE's (B's and C's) and 3 B's at A level with a further C at AS - would the University of Manchester consider this a "strong academic record"?

    This term seems incredibly vague - I went to a poor school and although my grades are average-ish overall, they were in the top 5 or 10 for the school I went to. Will this be considered at all?
    They would be more interested in your undergraduate degree because you are applying for a Postgraduate certificate. Do you have one?
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    I think the saying 'strong academic record' is very subjective. Compared to the national average i would say you have a decent academic record but compared to someone with 10 A*'s you don't!! go figure.

    Does the course requirements state any specific requirements they want? Most are just looking for a C or above in maths and english. Experience is the thing they look for most.
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    (Original post by cybergrad)
    They would be more interested in your undergraduate degree because you are applying for a Postgraduate certificate. Do you have one?
    Picking up on that point, some universities require you to have at least a 2:1 to be considered for their PGCE
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    (Original post by hagrid's big toe)
    What does this means exactly? I've come across it looking at PGCE req's.

    I have average GCSE's (B's and C's) and 3 B's at A level with a further C at AS - would the University of Manchester consider this a "strong academic record"?

    This term seems incredibly vague - I went to a poor school and although my grades are average-ish overall, they were in the top 5 or 10 for the school I went to. Will this be considered at all?
    Could you not contact them about it?
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    I am due to graduate in June.

    They say they require a minimum of a lower second class honours in this, which I should easily achieve. I could indeed contact them, but the answer you get over the phone comes from a secretary or similar, and I have found that if you doubt the original answer and ring back, someone else will answer and tell you something different. So no real way of knowing, unless TSR people do!
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    (Original post by hagrid's big toe)
    I am due to graduate in June.

    They say they require a minimum of a lower second class honours in this, which I should easily achieve. I could indeed contact them, but the answer you get over the phone comes from a secretary or similar, and I have found that if you doubt the original answer and ring back, someone else will answer and tell you something different. So no real way of knowing, unless TSR people do!
    That phrase itself, to me, means anything above standard, or average. It would be good performance at GCSE, A level and a good degree classification.
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    Get a 2.i and you'll be fine. "Strong Academic Record" is just a buzz phrase.
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    It's not possible to say what they would define as an acceptable standard, there are many factors in the decision making process.

    However, I was recently interviewed for Secondary PGCE at Manchester, most of the people I spoke to had done undergrad at Manchester or Durham, so I imagine there were a lot of A grades between most of the applicants...
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    I think universities and employers use this phrase because of its ambiguity. It just means that they care about academics but don't want to specify any threshold in case they find someone with bad grades who they like regardless, or in case one year all the prospective applicants have mediocre or poor academic histories. The fact that they don't specify their academic requirements means that they won't write you off because of your grades, but you might be against the odds if they happen to get a load of applicants with flawless academic records this year.

    That's all just my opinion though.
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    "Strong Academic Record" can mean so many things. As long as you have a set of good GCSE's and A-levels and most importantly degree classification you should be fine. Some of it will just be checking to make sure there are no gaping holes in your education and that you reach th required standard they need.
    As is said above, most will be looking to confirm you are 2.i and above but this does vary institution to institution. Nothing to worry about.
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    As someone else says, I expect they do it purely because it is so ambiguous. If they specified X As and Bs at GCSE and Y As and Bs at A level, they'd presumably have to turn away people without those grades, even if they'd make excellent teacher. It is my firm belief that you do not have to be THAT academic to be a primary teacher - you certianly won't need your subject knowledge up to GCSE level, and whilst it's good you are a positive role model as far as education goes, there are so many more important factors than your GCSE grades when deciding whether you'd be a good teacher.

    I believe the gov has a minimum requirement of a C at GCSE in Maths, English and Science however. Also, i THINK manchester has a minimum requirement of a 2.1 for PGCEs, as a guy on my course at Brookes only came here cos he couldn't get in to Mancester or Mancester Met with his 2.2.
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    Thanks for all your help guys - everybody's logic makes sense, and therein lies the problem really.

    I decided to apply anyway - what's the worst that can happen?

    For the record, I'm going for a secondary PGCE in a non-core subject, and though my grades may not be straight A's, I'm at a top 1994 group uni.
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    Where you went to uni generally makes very little difference for PGCEs. There are people on my course who did Open University, some from places like Exeter, and others from places like Mancester Met, Hull etc.
 
 
 
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