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She said her 'anaemia' has made her skin get lighter Watch

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    is this true?
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    It can make the skin appear pale, if that's what you meant?
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    Well it doesn't actually bleach the skin itself or anything but it can make you look pale.
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    You should give her some meat!
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    because the haemaglobin is affected in anaemia (the common cause anyway) it can affect the way red blood cells carry oxygen around the body and can make you appear paler than usual, it can also make you very drowsy and you're more likely to get colds and generally just feel rubbish. (trust me i've had it bad! )
    It's nothing to worry about though if Iron medication like Ferrous sulphate and other medication is used to top the levels back up to normal. Eat plenty of Red meat, Fish, Green vegetables, Guiness, and even Weetos they're good food for anaemia. Alrthough tbh most people's skin gets paler in winter due to the lack of vitamin d rich sunlight and cold weather.
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    (Original post by Charlotte76)
    because the haemaglobin is affected in anaemia (the common cause anyway) it can affect the way red blood cells carry oxygen around the body and can make you appear paler than usual, it can also make you very drowsy and you're more likely to get colds and generally just feel rubbish. (trust me i've had it bad! )
    It's nothing to worry about though if Iron medication like Ferrous sulphate and other medication is used to top the levels back up to normal. Eat plenty of Red meat, Fish, Green vegetables, Guiness, and even Weetos they're good food for anaemia. Alrthough tbh most people's skin gets paler in winter due to the lack of vitamin d rich sunlight and cold weather.
    This is all pretty dependant on the anaemia being due to a dietary deficiency and not something else...

    But yes, pallor is a sign of anaemia.
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    This is quite possible. I have heard lots of people go look paler/ghaunt etc. Although, personally when I had anemia I couldn't tell a difference. So I suppose it may vary person to person.

    Out of curiousity was their any particular reason you were concerned about this?
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    yes, as people have already said, anaemia can make somebody's skin planer.
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    (Original post by Charlotte76)
    because the haemaglobin is affected in anaemia (the common cause anyway) it can affect the way red blood cells carry oxygen around the body and can make you appear paler than usual, it can also make you very drowsy and you're more likely to get colds and generally just feel rubbish. (trust me i've had it bad! )
    It's nothing to worry about though if Iron medication like Ferrous sulphate and other medication is used to top the levels back up to normal. Eat plenty of Red meat, Fish, Green vegetables, Guiness, and even Weetos they're good food for anaemia. Alrthough tbh most people's skin gets paler in winter due to the lack of vitamin d rich sunlight and cold weather.
    This post lacks a lot of information for iron. I won't go into things like meat or fish, because I don't advocate them in the vast majority of peoples diets (I'm vegan). I'be put in green and red enhancers and inhibitors for iron absorption.

    Essentially I made this as a helpful guide to vegans and vegetarians worried about iron in take, although a lot of it is applicable to everyone:

    Spoiler:
    Show
    iron:
    RDA:
    Age amount mg per day
    0-6 (months) 0.27
    7-12 (months) 11
    1-3 7
    4-8 10
    9-13 8
    14-18 males 11 women 15 pregnant 27 lactating 10
    19-50 males 8 women 18 pregnant 27 lactating 9
    51+ 8

    Sources of tables: http://dietary-supplements.info.nih.gov/factsheets/iron.asp#h8
    Iron is important for red blood cells which carry oxygen, as well as other things, around the body.
    Health effects:
    Too much iron can lead to being more susceptible to bacteria infections. Where as too little will lead to anaemia. Anaemia is the first sign of an iron deficiency, and is where the blood loses it’s iron, decreasing the amount of oxygen being carried around the body. Which as you can guess means vital organs lacking in oxygen; causing a lack of energy release in the body.
    Men tend to have more iron than women, especially if the woman is menstruating, pregnant or lactating.
    Stolen from Wikipedia:
    “Most of the iron in the body is hoarded and recycled by the reticuloendothelial system, which breaks down aged red blood cells. However, people lose a small but steady amount by sweating and by shedding cells of the skin and the mucosal lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The total amount of loss for healthy people in the developed world amounts to an estimated average of 1 mg a day for men, and 1.5–2 mg a day for women with regular menstrual periods. People in developing countries with gastrointestinal parasitic infections often lose more. [6]
    This steady loss means that people must continue to absorb iron. They do so via a tightly regulated process that under normal circumstances protects against iron overload.”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_iron_metabolism#Absorbing_ iron_from_the_diet
    Spinach is harder to absorb from most vegetables and fruits instead of non vegan sources, however most should find with a healthy diet, they’ll be eating without trying, plenty of high iron foods.
    Sources for iron include:
    Kale, Spinach, broccoli, peas, pumpkin seeds, figs, dates, dried apricots and perhaps the best source, lentils.
    Absorption Inhibitors...
    Definitely: Red Wine, Coffee & Tea Whole grains and bran
    Apparently: Vegetables: Spinach, chard, beet greens, rhubarb and sweet potato Soy products.

    Absorption enhancers...
    Definitely:
    Fruits: Orange, Orange Juice, cantaloupe, strawberries, grapefruit etc
    Vegetables: Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, tomato, tomato juice, potato, green & red pepper.
    Apparently: White wine.

    “Note on spinach:
    You do not need to give it up if you are a spinach lover! Simply eat spinach with any foods containing iron absorption enhancers
    .” (http://www.healthcastle.com/iron.shtml)
    The things written under “apparently” are from:
    http://www.healthcastle.com/iron.shtml


    If anyone see’s a flaw, or something that needs to be added, don’t hesitate to post. If anyone feels that a source is biased or incorrect, again, don’t hesitate to post. Although if you can, please find a better one.

    Useful link:
    http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/iron.htm
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    I've had a history of anaemia and I'm very fair skinned naturally (red hair ) but when my iron level was really low, i was definetly even paler.

    When i passed out at school, my skin actually had this greyish tinge. Not very pretty at all. I just had to take iron tablets for a few months to kickstart my iron levels and then i just had to eat a lot of food that contained iron (some of the best are red meat, spinach, wholemeal bread and rice and most leafy green vegetables). Oh, and I needed to take in lots of Vitamin C to help with iron absorbtion.

    If the red rims of her eyelids are very pale too, that is another symptom of anaemia.

    Hope this helps
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    That would explain why my skin has gone from milky brown to milky milky brown!
 
 
 
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