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Frightened to take old dog to vet incase they put him down :( Watch

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    Hey everyone,

    I have a 14 year old yorkshire terrior, and in the past year or so he's suffered the occasional seizure, which seems to have stopped now but has left his back legs pretty stiff.

    In the past few weeks I've noticed him lose a fair bit of weight and be generally quite weak, and have just found a weird lump thing on his belly, it's bright pink with a black head. I'm thinking it must be cancer, and wanted to take him to the vets, but now people are telling me that when they took their old dog to the vet with a growth they put him down straight away My friend said it'd be better for him to die at home (considering the rate of his decline) rather than subject him to examinations at the vet and being put down, and I'd never forgive myself if he died whilst being somewhere weird and being scared, but I keep thinking maybe it isn't cancerous! Although there'd still be prodding and probing I guess

    I must sound really selfish for considering keeping him here, but I know what a state he gets in when people (especially vets) try to examine him, let alone operate.

    What do you think I should do?
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    I wouldn't let your dog suffer :/
    Take them to the vet.

    Yeah, it'd be really sad if he got put down but wouldn't you rather he died painlessly than suffering at home?
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    Its obvious you love your dog, but the most loving thing might be to let him go
    Be brave and go (you never know, they may not even put him down!)
    Stay strong xx
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    Take your dog to the vet! Your vet can never force you to put your dog down.
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    Yeah take him to the vet. I have a really old cat and didn't want to take her to the vet cos I was certain they would put her down (lost loads of weight, couldn't walk, blood in her wee and being sick) but they said she had a water infection. She is still a bag of bones and can't walk but she isn't actually ill, just old.
    Take him to the vet, wouldn't you want to know if there is something you can do to help him? I'm no expert but I haven't ever heard of a cancerous lump having a head on it.....even if it is, it doesn't mean he will have to be put down
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    It's certainly not better to let him die at home - because it sounds as if he'd be in a whole lot of pain if you did nothing and just 'let him be'. Taking him to the vets doesn't necessarily mean he'll be put down, he may be offered treatment or painkillers. If the vet does want to put him down, then maybe that is for the best if he's only going to get worse. The vet knows best.
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    Take him to the vet and get a proper diagnosis. Old dogs get lots of lumps and bumps but the best thing you can do is get the advice of a professional rather than speculation from others.

    Listen carefully to what the vet tells you, discuss any treatment options and then be adult enough to make the best decision for your dog once you know all of the facts. It may be something not too serious. Our old girl went on with heath problems for several years - we had vets reviews every three months and she lasted ages longer than we thought. Whilst she was still happy, bringing her ball and wagging tail, we knew to keep her treatment going.
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    They cannot put your dog down without your consent.

    They might be able to offer treatment. You never know, this might be something curable.

    Even if your dog is terminally ill, the vet might be able to offer treatment to extend his life or make him more comfortable.

    If your dog is in pain or is confused, the kindest thing might be to let him go. If you are adamant this must happen at home you can pay your vet to do a home visit.
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    Take your dog to the vet, they can't put him down without you saying yes.

    I had a very similar thing happen to me with my rabbit, he died just over a month ago. I kept wavering on whether to have him put down, because I didn't want him to suffer but I also didn't want him feeling scared, because I know he doesn't like the vets and it can often leave him worse than before. In the end, we took him and even though he was too old for them to do anything, they offered him painkillers to keep him going. He lost quite a bit of weight and lost the use of one of his back legs and just deteriorated from there. I was away at uni when his other back leg went, and didn't find out he'd been put down until a week later.

    It is best for your dog not to suffer. I know it's hard but just take him to the vets, they will do everything they can for him and what is best for him. And if it really is time for him to go, give it some time before you take him, just so you can say goodbye. It can be more painful to be there when it happens but obviously it is your choice. I wish I was there when my rabbit had to go, because now I just keep thinking I'm horrible for not being there for him. You will not want to live with the guilt of feeling like you have made your dog suffer. So please, take him to the vets.

    Take care and good luck.
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    Even if it is cancer, it's unlikely they'll put the dog down right away. My dog was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer when he was 14, but amazingly he fine for another 11 months!
    Apparently, in older dogs cancer can spread/grow less quickly. In the end, he was put down during a very bad seizure - he was at home with us and had no idea what was happening. I think it's best to take your dog to the vet - they'll probably recommend regular check-ups to monitor his progress. Lumps are very common in older dogs anyway though, so it may be nothing to worry about. Hope everything goes well for your dog.
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    (Original post by panda_baby)
    Hey everyone,

    I have a 14 year old yorkshire terrior, and in the past year or so he's suffered the occasional seizure, which seems to have stopped now but has left his back legs pretty stiff.

    In the past few weeks I've noticed him lose a fair bit of weight and be generally quite weak, and have just found a weird lump thing on his belly, it's bright pink with a black head. I'm thinking it must be cancer, and wanted to take him to the vets, but now people are telling me that when they took their old dog to the vet with a growth they put him down straight away My friend said it'd be better for him to die at home (considering the rate of his decline) rather than subject him to examinations at the vet and being put down, and I'd never forgive myself if he died whilst being somewhere weird and being scared, but I keep thinking maybe it isn't cancerous! Although there'd still be prodding and probing I guess

    I must sound really selfish for considering keeping him here, but I know what a state he gets in when people (especially vets) try to examine him, let alone operate.

    What do you think I should do?
    Aww, what a horrible situation to be in.
    :console:

    Well the decision is up to you. It's a hard and horrible decision to make. I've been in a similar situation. My 14 year old spaniel who had no health problems had a stroke one night At the time I did not know it was a stroke but she seemed to settle down for the night. In the morning she was no better so my parents took her to the vet whilst I was told to go to college. When I came home from college my parents told she had to be put down as there was nothing else which could be done for her. The grief did not hit me until a few hours later when I realised she was not comming back. To go through it is horrible but you have to do what is best for your dog. I can't tell you to take her to the vets or not, but if it was me I would take the dog to the vets. The vets know what is best for your dog. It's a horrible feeling to lose a pet but as time goes by it does get better. My dog had a large pink lump on her chest for years and evey time she went to the vets for a check up the vet said it was not cancer and was just a lump.

    Another thing to consider is that your dog may be suffering and thats something you don't want on your mind. It's not true that vets put down every old dog. The lump may not even be cancer but then again it may be. My dog had a large pink lump on her chest for years and evey time she went to the vets for a check up the vet said it was not cancer and was just a lump. A friend of mine had an 18 year old dog who had cancer and took him to the vets, the vets said there is nothing else that can be done and said to my friend to take the dog home and make the dog as comfortable as possible. The vets can't put your dog down without your consent. At the end of the day you know your own dog so do what you believe is the right decision and in the best interest for the dog.

    All the best and hope both you and your dog are ok.
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    Stop being so selfish, the vet will decide what's best for the dog
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    I think the advice already given is all right. If your dog is suffering pts is the kindest option.

    I totally understand not wanting to take him to the vet as you're right, it's a strange and scary place so you could discuss with your vet the possibility of putting him to sleep at home.

    I know it's seen as less important but I recently had a mouse pts and I totally understand your feelings about not wanting your dogs last moments to be stressful and scary. I still feel bad about it now and if pts at home was an option for a mouse I definitely would have gone for it - not matter what it cost.
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    They cannot put him down without consent. If so they will have a lot of **** on their hands.
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    (Original post by panda_baby)
    Hey everyone,

    I have a 14 year old yorkshire terrior, and in the past year or so he's suffered the occasional seizure, which seems to have stopped now but has left his back legs pretty stiff.

    In the past few weeks I've noticed him lose a fair bit of weight and be generally quite weak, and have just found a weird lump thing on his belly, it's bright pink with a black head. I'm thinking it must be cancer, and wanted to take him to the vets, but now people are telling me that when they took their old dog to the vet with a growth they put him down straight away My friend said it'd be better for him to die at home (considering the rate of his decline) rather than subject him to examinations at the vet and being put down, and I'd never forgive myself if he died whilst being somewhere weird and being scared, but I keep thinking maybe it isn't cancerous! Although there'd still be prodding and probing I guess

    I must sound really selfish for considering keeping him here, but I know what a state he gets in when people (especially vets) try to examine him, let alone operate.

    What do you think I should do?

    Firstly, are you sure it's not a nipple?
    If its not they won't put your dog down if the dog has a good quality of life. If the dog can still move around comfortably, has a good appetite and sleeps well then they will do a biopsy and remove whatever it was on your dog.

    Don't be selfish. If your dog isn't uncomfortable maybe its his time to go.. I know it is hard but if it's best for your dog then do it.
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    I agree with everyone else, Its much better to take your dog to the vets, they may not need to put him/her down, instead they may suggest a treatment for whatever is wrong. If the end result is that they suggest they put the dog down then I'd say for you to do it, its not fair to let your dog die at your home considering the amount of pain your dog might be in.
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    Take him to the vet first to see whether or not he needs a treatment and if there isn't one get him put down at home, think about the pain he is in
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    The vet will never force you to put your dog down. At worst they'll give you the option, and perhaps some pressure, into doing it. It'll always be your decision.
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    Take him too the vet.
    My dog is 15 and covered in lumps and bumps. I took her straight to the vet when I found a lump and they prodded it a bit and said unless it gets bigger then leave it.

    The fact is you are not a vet and cannot diagnose lumps. The lump could be benign and the weakness and weight loss could be a parasitic infection?

    The majority of vets will perform a biopsy to confirm it is actually cancer. Vets don't put animals down for fun. Plus you can always get a second opinion if you think the vet is unwilling to help your dog because he/she is old.

    Hope everything turns out to be ok x
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    I certainly hope she took her dog to the vet.
 
 
 
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